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age 35
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Aug 20 at 16:59

Apr
8
comment File has bytes - appears to be empty
Did you neglect to mention that your system crashed/lost power shortly after you wrote that file?
Apr
8
comment Why is writing so slow on raw device, and so fast on filesystem (USB key)?
@Bananguin, the "optimization" is to avoid fragmenting files, keeping the IO contiguous. dd to the raw block device is all contiguous, so that is as good as it gets.
Apr
8
comment Why is writing so slow on raw device, and so fast on filesystem (USB key)?
@mikeserv, the block device interface caches direct access to block devices.
Apr
8
comment Why is writing so slow on raw device, and so fast on filesystem (USB key)?
The filesystem will be writing the file somewhere other than the start of the partition. Perhaps there is something wrong with the area near the start? Try a single dd but with higher seek arguments to write to different parts of the disk.
Apr
8
comment Why is writing so slow on raw device, and so fast on filesystem (USB key)?
Writing directly to a block device does use the cache.
Apr
7
answered Can swap be shared safely while hibernating?
Apr
7
comment While trying to open /dev/mtd2 for read/write access: Permission denied
@Graeme, giving everyone read permission to a block device isn't a good idea, and isn't going to help with write access.
Apr
3
comment Ext2 block structure: size of reserved GDT Blocks
@goose999, I checked the source and it seems that the number of reserved blocks is capped at how many will fit in a single indirect block, which for 1k block size is 256. I guess they didn't want to be bothered with having to allocate more than a single indirect block.
Apr
2
comment Ext2 block structure: size of reserved GDT Blocks
@goose999, ahh, I forgot about that silly arbitrary limitation on the smaller block sizes. In that case, it should be 13 ( you can only have a whole number of block groups ) * 32 = 416 blocks.
Apr
2
comment Ext2 block structure: size of reserved GDT Blocks
@goose999, you should only have 4 block groups, so 4 * 32 = 128 bytes, so 1024 times that is 128 blocks.
Apr
2
comment ext3 Filesystem shows full to most apps, but only 77% full to DF
@JoelDavis, I'm betting that count is wrong and df -i will show he is indeed out, and a fsck will fix the count in the superblock.
Apr
2
comment Ext2 block structure: size of reserved GDT Blocks
@goose999, because that is 1024 times the size of the group descriptor table.
Apr
2
answered Clear unused space with zeros (ext3,ext4)
Apr
2
answered Ext2 block structure: size of reserved GDT Blocks
Apr
2
comment Ext2 block structure: size of reserved GDT Blocks
It looks like this program is simply buggy. How large of a filesystem is this?
Apr
1
comment Where is filename stored on a filesystem?
@LưuVĩnhPhúc, ntfs does.. it just calls it an MFT record, but it's pretty much an inode.
Apr
1
comment Bash, how to let some background processes run but wait for others?
@mikeserv, what are you talking about? That's the point: it waits for all of the children in that subshell.
Mar
31
answered Bash, how to let some background processes run but wait for others?
Mar
31
comment Why do I need initramfs ?
@mikeserv, the pedantic semantic argument you are making is that an initramfs that is built in, empty, and unused is not the same thing as no initramfs. In the strictest technical interpretation that may be true, but practically, that's what people mean when they say no initramfs. To put it another way, if you can not tell ( just by using the kernel rather than reading the source code ) the difference between truly having no initramfs, and what really happens, then it is as if you have no initramfs.
Mar
30
comment Why do I need initramfs ?
@mikeserv, no, /root is the home directory for the root user. The rootfs is /, which then has the real root mounted over top of it. You are just arguing semantics. For the purposes of this discussion, not having an initramfs means not having a file on the disk your boot loader has to load and pass to the kernel.