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Dec
5
comment Shrinking LVM physical volume on top of mdadm degraded RAID array, adding a spare and rebuilding it
@TranslucentCloud, like frostschutz said: that is the point of lvm. I have pvmoved my root volume from old drive to new multiple times over the last few years, while it is mounted.
Dec
4
comment Shrinking LVM physical volume on top of mdadm degraded RAID array, adding a spare and rebuilding it
@TranslucentCloud, who said anything about a live system? Either way you have to install grub on the new drives. Since you are running debian that is pretty easy: dpkg-reconfigure grub-pc and select the new drives.
Dec
4
comment Shrinking LVM physical volume on top of mdadm degraded RAID array, adding a spare and rebuilding it
@TranslucentCloud, it takes less time to create a new array than to resize the old one, rebuild it on one of the new drives, remove the old drive, and rebuild it again.
Dec
4
answered Shrinking LVM physical volume on top of mdadm degraded RAID array, adding a spare and rebuilding it
Dec
1
comment Which kernel option for “Intel 8 Series Chipset Family Thermal Management Controller”
What makes you think you need a driver for it? These kinds of motherboard devies often don't.
Dec
1
answered Difference between Reply-To address and From address in an email
Nov
26
comment Restore EFI boot partition
sigh... you would need a bcache driver to access your root fs instead of storing the kernel on the esp. And when you install a new kernel, don't you then need to edit the refind config to point to that new kernel? Also what distro is using symlinks with grub? Symlinks were used in the 90s with lilo, not with grub. You also seem to not understand that grub comes in an EFI flavor that gets installed as a regular file on the esp just like refind and instead you keep comparing it to bios based grub.
Nov
26
comment Restore EFI boot partition
There isn't an EFI bcache driver, so you do have to. My real point here has been that having to manually copy your kernel and initrd to the ESP and update refit each time your distribution updates the kernel, or go through all the trouble of setting up refit plus the efi filesystem drivers is a lot more work than just sticking with grub, for little to no gain, so it is inappropriate to claim that grub is "nothing but a distraction" and "not even a boot loader" ( the latter of which is false ) and suggest everyone not use it, even if you can manage to hack your system into not using it.
Nov
26
comment Restore EFI boot partition
I've read the bloody links already. You clearly are putting the kernel and initramfs on the EFI system partition in them, rather than loading them from the regular filesystem, which the efi firmware does not have access to.
Nov
25
comment Restore EFI boot partition
If a tree falls in the woods and nobody is there to hear it, does it make a sound? That is the kind of hair splitting useless argument you are making by mentioning that the rootfs is still there even if you didn't load an initramfs. We're only talking about loading an image or not. EFI can not load and pass the kernel the initramfs image, which is why, as you pointed out, you pass its path as a command line argument to the kernel. If the kernel can't access that path, say, because it is on lvm, then it can't load it and so you can't boot. Just try your setup with lvm. It won't work.
Nov
25
comment Restore EFI boot partition
No, the reason it exists is to support complex configs like raid and lvm, which require a good deal of complex logic to set up and mount. Logic that the kernel devs did NOT want in the kernel itself. If you instead just have a plain regular partition on a regular disk, you can build all the drivers required to access your rootfs into the kernel, and then there is no reason to even bother having an initramfs in the first place -- you just go back to telling the kernel what device to mount as root= and it can do so without the initramfs just like it used to before initramfs was around.
Nov
25
comment Restore EFI boot partition
I think I figured out why you are confused. When they added the ability for the kernel to be built as a self loading EFI image, they gave it the ability to be passed the initramfs path as a command line argument and load it itself, since otherwise it would not be possible to have an initramfs without the boot loader. This however, is fundamentally pointless since if the kernel is capable of loading its own initramfs, you don't need one. Conversely, if you really need one, it is because the kernel can't access the disk without it, so you are back to having to use grub.
Nov
25
comment Restore EFI boot partition
You posted one link and it was about loading grub's filesystem drivers as EFI drivers. If you are going to do that, then those are redundant, not the other way around. Since virtually nobody dose this, EFI can't access anything other than fat32. The kernel does not load the initramfs, since it can't access the disk without the initramfs. If it could, you wouldn't need an initramfs in the first place. The kernel does unpack the image, but it is already in ram when grub jumps to the kernel. Trust me, I have read the code.
Nov
25
answered no pwm-capable sensor modules installed on MSI B75MA-P45
Nov
25
comment Restore EFI boot partition
grub's filesystem drivers are not redundant since without them you wouldn't have access to anything but the ESP. You are also wrong about the initramfs. It is not a parameter passed to the kernel, but a file that is loaded by grub, hence why it is given to grub as its own command instead of a kernel parameter. It has to be loaded by the boot loader since it usually contains the drivers the kernel needs to access the disk.
Nov
25
comment /init can't find /bin/mount, but find / can?
They are there inside the initramfs, or inside your normal system?
Nov
25
comment Restore EFI boot partition
While a boot manager can load EFI filesystem drivers, grub does not do so. It directly interprets the filesystem itself, locates the kernel, and initramfs, and loads and jumps to them, never returning to the EFI firmware. That is why it is not technically an EFI boot manager. It could be made to be, but it currently isn't. Also the initramfs is not just an argument; it is a separate module that is loaded in its own right ( by grub ). Also while you can build linux to be an EFI executable, you don't have to and grub is still capable of loading conventional vmlinux or multiboot images.
Nov
24
comment /init can't find /bin/mount, but find / can?
Check it with ldd. It probably depends on a shared library that you are missing.
Nov
24
comment Restore EFI boot partition
Grub is definitely a boot loader since it can load non EFI kernel images from filesystems the EFI firmware does not understand. It just also happens to provide much the same type of functionality as a boot manager in that it lets you choose different systems to boot and ways in which to boot them. A true EFI boot manager only allows you to choose which boot loader installed on your EFI system partition you want to load. Trying to bypass grub means you have to copy your kernel to the EFI system partition, and iirc, means you can't use an initrd. This will cause all sorts of pain.
Nov
24
comment linux boot stick being ignored on windows 7
You need to tell your computer to boot from the USB stick of course. How to do that varies from motherboard to motherboard but it usually involves pressing F11 or delete during boot.