7,434 reputation
621
bio website
location
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 7 hours ago

Dec
13
comment /proc/self/maps - 3rd mapped piece of file?
Based on the observed behavior, the reverse is true: it uses the sections header. Only paying attention to the segments table works since the only error it introduces is incorrectly granting execute permission to a few sections that don't need it.
Dec
13
answered How to remount as read-write a specific mount of device?
Dec
13
comment /proc/self/maps - 3rd mapped piece of file?
@newbie, because the Sections: header says it is divided into the .got.plt, .data, and .bss segments.
Dec
12
comment different ways how Linux TCP/IP stack terminates connection
There are no SYN flags in the trace you listed; only FIN and ACK. It looks like you simply did not capture the opening of the connection and only got the perfectly normal close.
Dec
12
comment /proc/self/maps - 3rd mapped piece of file?
@newbie, again, it can't since the second mapping is read only, and the data segment must be writable.
Dec
12
comment take the DRAM performance of the processes into consideration when scheduling
@BeileiSun, (n)either. It doesn't really matter whether one is using only the cpu and the other is using the cpu and ram; both need the cpu so that is the only thing that matters to the scheduler.
Dec
12
comment take the DRAM performance of the processes into consideration when scheduling
@BeileiSun, heavy cpu usage does not imply heavy ram usage, but the reverse is true. This is because the cpu can be busy with things other than accessing ram, but you can not be busily accessing ram without using the cpu.
Dec
12
comment /proc/self/maps - 3rd mapped piece of file?
The second mapping can not be .data and .bss since it is read only and those segments are read/write. @Giles was correct here. Use objdump -x to see the different segments and you should find the .data segment lines up with that third mapping.
Dec
12
comment take the DRAM performance of the processes into consideration when scheduling
@BeileiSun, I have no idea why you reference that question. You can't access the ram without running on the cpu, so heavy ram use implies heavy cpu use. Well, with the exception of hardware direct memory access for IO anyhow.
Dec
11
comment Verify Linux FAT32 Support
Maybe you are plugging it into a usb3 port, and your first kernel doesn't have the usb3 driver?
Dec
11
answered take the DRAM performance of the processes into consideration when scheduling
Dec
11
comment How to install Linux on a system with no CD-ROM drive and no USB boot option?
You will have to pull the drive out and connect it to another computer that can boot from something suitable.
Dec
11
answered KVM linux guest, 2nd HDD, LVM partition or whole disk
Dec
11
comment KVM linux guest, 2nd HDD, LVM partition or whole disk
The kernel is perfectly happy to resize partitions while the disk is in use. parted 3.2 will do this just fine.
Dec
11
comment Verify Linux FAT32 Support
If the device doesn't show up, then what filesystem it is formatted with doesn't enter the picture. You seem to have a busted device or usb port.
Dec
9
comment nc: bind failed: Address already in use
Actually I believe this is a bug in linux. While it is true that you can not reuse the same src/dst touple while the previous connection is in TIME_WAIT, by changing the destination port you have selected a different, and therefore non conflicting touple.
Dec
9
comment Using GIt with multiple servers
I'm having trouble visualizing this. You have one master server that should hold every repo, and several other servers that each should hold a copy of some of the repos... but nobody should access those? Do you want a push to the master replicate to the slave, or the other way around, or both?
Dec
9
comment Using GIt with multiple servers
Why don't you just have everyone use the same bloody server? Do you want anything pushed to any of the servers to automatically be pushed to all of the others? Or is this a one way street?
Dec
7
comment BTRFS data integrity (CRC32c) and HDD data integrity (sector ECC)
@AdamRyczkowski, Umm... yes, that is indeed the subject of my answer. I'm not sure why you are pointing out the obvious.
Dec
5
answered BTRFS data integrity (CRC32c) and HDD data integrity (sector ECC)