186 reputation
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location Australia
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Sep 9 at 0:23

Debian user


Jul
2
comment How can I send stdout to multiple commands?
Thanks so much for providing the two alternative versions for those who don't want to rely on bash or a certain ksh.
Jun
23
awarded  Commentator
Jun
23
comment How can I send stdout to multiple commands?
Obviously this solution is possible only when you know the size of the output will easily fit in memory, and you're OK with buffering the entire output before running the next commands on it. Pipes solve these two problems by allowing arbitrary length data and streaming it in real time to the receiver as it's generated.
Apr
3
comment Why ext4 File System is better than NTFS?
That pc world article is not very good. One of the strongest points it makes in favour of NTFS is that Word documents are smaller than OpenOffice/LibreOffice documents -??? Also it throws around terms like extents and allocate on flush without saying what NTFS does instead or why it's better.
Apr
3
comment Why ext4 File System is better than NTFS?
Psusi is correct in that the fragmentation is not inherent to the on disk format but the driver implementation. However it's very hard to make an objective comparison as NTFS on Linux is not particularly well optimised. It's true that ext3/4 on Linux is more fragmentation-resistant than NTFS on windows, though, and yes that is still the driver, not the filesystem, primarily affecting that.
Oct
12
comment Where in “/” should extra disks be mounted?
/mnt is itself intended as a point where filesystems can be mounted temporarily by the system admin. If you obey this recommendation, then you wouldn't mount anything permanently in there. But similarly, /media is intended to contain mount points for removable media. If the user cannot "eject" or "remove" it then it probably doesn't belong in there. Which still leaves the question of where to mount permanent additional drives.
Oct
5
comment Has anyone actually tested laptop battery life under different CPU governors?
I suspect the same but I haven't seen actual figures before. A lot of sites recommend altering the CPU governor to get more laptop battery life, and my theory is that this is not gonna save you anything significant :)
Oct
5
comment Has anyone actually tested laptop battery life under different CPU governors?
Thanks for that interesting link. It looks like ondemand and conservative are identical at 0% load and from 50% load to 100% load, while loads from 1% to 49% will benefit by up to ~30 Watts out of an insane ~380 Watts. This is one seriously power-hungry system with something like 10 times the power usage of a modern laptop.
Oct
4
asked Has anyone actually tested laptop battery life under different CPU governors?
Apr
21
comment Why do most distros (other than Debian) recommend/require a full reinstall when upgrading to a new version?
Debian fully supports upgrades from previous stable to current stable. Since they are 2 or 3 years apart, they involve major transitions such as glibc, KDE 3 to 4, the upcoming Gnome 2 to 3, etc. You mention that some packages are hard to upgrade and must be reinstalled - this is what is known within Debian as a "major transition" and yet their package manager is perfectly capable of managing these and they fully test and support them for end users. I'm thinking it has a lot more to do about mindset than you claim - Debian believes it's the right way to go about it, so they make it happen.
Apr
20
comment Why do most distros (other than Debian) recommend/require a full reinstall when upgrading to a new version?
Ubuntu includes a special tool for upgrades that supposedly takes care of more than just a dist-upgrade does. Do you know more about it and is it any good?
Apr
20
asked Why do most distros (other than Debian) recommend/require a full reinstall when upgrading to a new version?
Apr
11
comment Differences between Debian and Ubuntu
I feel that this answer is well-meaning but doesn't really help the OP's situation, where he is dissatisfied with arbitrary decisions imposed upon Ubuntu and is thinking of switching to Debian. I also disagree that Debian is for "advanced" Linux users significantly more than Ubuntu is. If one thing sets Debian apart, it's that it isn't focused on any one particular type of user, whereas Ubuntu is focused on the desktop user. Because of this, that particular type of user (the desktop user) may find Ubuntu more tailored to their needs out of the box.
Jun
7
comment Fetching email automatically then reading it locally
@alex that is a good point, though Thunderbird eats a massive amount of memory for something you might have running all the time. It'd be good if it had a separate lightweight fetcher daemon that could run in the background.
Jun
5
awarded  Student
Jun
5
asked Fetching email automatically then reading it locally
May
17
awarded  Supporter
Apr
28
awarded  Autobiographer