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  • 48 votes cast
Mar
31
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
comment Why did mv delete a file with mv id_rsa *.old?
@cas: "Duplicate" and "underlying problem are the same" are completely different issues. It's very possible for multiple questions to have the same underlying problem; this does not invalidate their status as independent questions. In this case, you're wrongly comparing a question from a user who understands how unix globs work but wants to do something like MSDOS wildcards with a question from a user who mistakenly thinks globs are MSDOS wildcards.
Feb
26
comment On Unix systems, why do we have to explicitly `open()` and `close()` files to be able to `read()` or `write()` them?
@Joshua: Such a system has fundamentally different semantics because unix file descriptors do not refer to files (inodes) but to open file descriptions, of which there may be many for a given file (inode).
Dec
30
revised How to convert an emoticon specified by a U+xxxxx code to utf-8?
edited body
Dec
30
answered How to convert an emoticon specified by a U+xxxxx code to utf-8?
Nov
17
comment Host name changed remotely by wifi?
Yes, this is a bug, but one that people depending on it don't want fixed. :-(
Oct
11
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: Despite being frustrating, discussing this was productive in tracking down the issue. I've added an answer including notes on why I expected what I want to be possible, why it's not practical without modifying the kernel, and how the kernel could be trivially modified to support it.
Oct
11
answered Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
The kernel does not ignore it when an initramfs is appended, only when /init actually exists in the initramfs. Otherwise it tries to mount the root= device, mounts devtmpfs, and executes /sbin/init (or the init= command).
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: The distinction between "no initramfs" and "empty initramfs" is inconsequential. Either way, the kernel, not userspace, mounts the filesystem specified by root=. You can read this code in init/do_mounts.c. It most definitely happens in the kernel because there are no userspace programs in existence at this point.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: Are you ignoring everything I've said? In case (1) there is no initramfs. The kernel mounts the final (and only) root fs directly. My question is how to get an initramfs treated like a normal root.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: There are two scenarios I'm comparing whose behaviors differ: (1) no initrd image at all, root= processed by the kernel to directly mount the main filesystem, (2) exact same filesystem as in case 1, but linked into the kernel as an initramfs. I want to use exactly the same boot sequence for both, but the kernel insists on starting them differently because it thinks the latter is a temporary fs that will mount the real root fs later. I am asking if there's a way to inhibit this behavior and have the kernel treat both the same.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: My init executable most certainly does not handle root= because I wrote it. Please stop trying to answer this question with reasoning based on what your distro is doing. This question is about kernel behavior not typical initrd scripts' behaviors. The root= case I'm talking about is when no initrd whatsoever exists and the kernel does the mounting.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: That's false. With a normal root= root fs, devtmpfs is mounted by default by the kernel (CONFIG_DEVTMPFS_MOUNT) before any userspace processes execute, allowing /dev/console to be opened for the init process (by the kernel) without any hard device nodes existing anywhere, and the command specified by init= is executed as pid 1. This does not happen with initramfs. The difference in behavior is definitely on the kernel side and not in userspace. It's trivially testable with a fs consisting of a single static-linked program.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: The question is how to make an initramfs (linked into the kernel, but that doesn't matter to the question) get treated the way a normal root fs would get treated. If you want to say "Linux does not support that", that would be an answer. Claiming that it's already doing that is false and not helpful.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: You can observe all the behaviors I described with a trivial initramfs containing nothing but a static-linked program named init which lists the contents of /dev.
Oct
10
comment Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
@mikeserv: Your comment is demonstrably false and does not address the question.
Oct
10
asked Is there a way to get Linux to treat an initramfs as the final root filesystem?
Sep
29
answered Is there a reason I would not add /usr/local/sbin, /usr/sbin, /sbin to my path on Debian?
Sep
14
comment Why are all my SSH attempts failing due to timeout?
@Hut8: Is right. Of your 3 possibilities, only the third one (firewall) could possibly lead to timeouts.