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Feb
20
awarded  Civic Duty
Jan
25
comment Run another command before running the command the user wants to run
@IonicăBizău any given "alias expansion rule" is only used once.
Jan
22
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Jan
11
answered Save exit code for later
Jan
8
comment Why do we need to mount on Linux?
@Ehryk (3 comments up) the only preventative measure in a typical Linux system is the filesystem permissions - in other words, you have to use the root account to write to a device file. If you do, you can cat >/dev/sda1 to your heart's content and Linux won't stop you. (Needless to say, doing so would completely corrupt the filesystem.)
Dec
14
comment Replace %20 with a space in filenames?
This was my thought as well, but it might be worth putting more emphasis on the reason for the OP's problem, which is the space, not the use of an unnecessary pipeline.
Dec
9
comment How can one run a program installed in one machine from another machine?
This doesn't achieve Andyc's goal of having the files stored on the work computer though.
Nov
27
awarded  Critic
Oct
24
comment combine two text files with adding some separator between?
In the last example, in bash at least, you can replace echo '***' | cat ... with cat ... <<< '***' which saves a couple of processes. (this is sometimes relevant)
Oct
15
revised bash's builtin time accepts %E - what's going on?
add a link to relevant source code
Oct
15
suggested approved edit on bash's builtin time accepts %E - what's going on?
Oct
15
accepted bash's builtin time accepts %E - what's going on?
Oct
15
comment bash's builtin time accepts %E - what's going on?
Indeed! Though I'm pretty sure something is wrong (with the blame falling on the man page maintainers) if we really have to go to the source code to see the explanation for this.
Oct
15
asked bash's builtin time accepts %E - what's going on?
Sep
25
answered Is rsync really bidirectional or more unidirectional?
Sep
8
comment Why do I have to make my own drivers?
fair point - I should say, if there isn't a package available that contains the driver, then you have to download it manually. If the manufacturer, or whoever provides the driver, has a prebuilt binary package, you use that; if they provide the source code, then you need to compile it. That much is OS-independent. However it's conventional to provide only binary packages for Windows and Mac, whereas it's more conventional to provide source code for Linux, probably due to the wide variety of configurations Linux systems can have.
Sep
8
comment Why do I have to make my own drivers?
You install drivers using apt-get the same way you'd install any other program. You just need to figure out the package name that corresponds to the driver you need, and make sure it's in one of your repositories. If there isn't a package available that contains the driver, then you probably need to compile it from the source code, but that's no different from how things work on any other OS.
Sep
8
comment Why do I have to make my own drivers?
*NIX doesn't require you to compile your own drivers. In Linux distribution in which packages aren't compiled from source (most prominently Ubuntu), you download precompiled drivers and programs using the package manager.
Aug
4
comment How do you remember command options?
I fully agree with this answer, though I think it's worth emphasizing that it is normal to have the few most common options to common programs memorized, just because you use them so often. Like rm -i -f -r, ln -s, df -s -h, cp -r -i, ls -l -h -a, etc. (the list varies from person to person).