589 reputation
34
bio website eric.windisch.us
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Mar 8 '11 at 14:31

Jan
12
awarded  Yearling
Sep
11
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
awarded  Yearling
Mar
8
answered .Xresources settings in effect
Feb
18
comment Is there a CD/DVD disk reading test tool for Linux?
You're right that md5sum can do the comparison on the file itself. For simple comparisons, it can be a better solution. However, it can be useful to throw 'pv' in the middle there, or to script around 'kill -USR1' to provide statistics. Remember that we're talking about relatively slow media such as CDs/DVDs. Besides, as silly of a reason as it might be, using 'dd' provided symmetry to the other example.
Feb
18
comment Is there a CD/DVD disk reading test tool for Linux?
'cat /dev/cdrom' might work, but you then have to pipe the output via your shell to discard it. I don't think this is really a better solution than using dd which is entirely self-contained. Using 'dd' will also provide errors, statistics, and other useful information that 'cat' will not.
Jan
20
awarded  Supporter
Jan
16
revised How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
missing .
Jan
16
comment How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
Gilles, I guess not. It had originally, but I mucked it up in editing. I've removed the xargs and it should work properly again.
Jan
15
revised How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
fix
Jan
15
revised How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
added one-liner
Jan
15
comment How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
As a one-liner for the pwd: pushd $(pwd) >/dev/null; OIFS=$IFS; IFS="/"; for dir in $(pwd); do stat -c "$(pwd) %A" .; cd ..; done; IFS=$OIFS; popd >/dev/null
Jan
15
answered How to lock one mouse/keyboard pair to each screen?
Jan
15
revised How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
Accept argument rather than defaulting to pwd
Jan
15
answered How do I recursively check permissions in reverse?
Jan
15
awarded  Editor
Jan
15
revised How to apply recursively chmod directories without affecting files?
added 117 characters in body; deleted 10 characters in body
Jan
15
comment How to apply recursively chmod directories without affecting files?
@Gilles Thanks, it isn't too frequent that I learn something new about Unix tools :-) That is awesome. Also, now reading the find documentation, one should really use -execdir instead.
Jan
15
answered How to apply recursively chmod directories without affecting files?