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1d
comment How can I use different kerberos principals for sudo than for system-auth?
I ended up solving my problem. Basically, the approach that I'm using is to "proxy" kerberos through pam_sss for one service (login) and use pam_krb5 directly for another service (sudo). This way I can use different appdefaults sections for the two services and take advantage of separate mappings attributes for each service. I'll write up my solution and add it to your answer tomorrow.
1d
comment How can I use different kerberos principals for sudo than for system-auth?
I saw that update - looks like exactly what I need - unfortunately, I don't see the alt_auth_map option to pam_krb5 on RHEL 6.7 or 7.1 :( (and building our own pam-krb5 package would just be laterally transforming our original problem)
1d
comment How can I use different kerberos principals for sudo than for system-auth?
Hmmm, looks like I may be able to perform dynamic mapping using the full_name_format option in a domain block of sssd.conf (I'm looking at a man page on RHEL 6.7). Where were you seeing that SSSD only supports static mappings?
1d
comment Building RPM results in nothing generated in RPMS directory
Also, why are you creating a package that requires a package called python2.6 and a package called python2.7? I doubt those packages are available on most RHEL systems (the Python package on all RHEL systems I know of is simply called python), and those packages look like they would conflict anyway.
1d
comment Building RPM results in nothing generated in RPMS directory
As an aside, you never declared any files in your %files section. Without any files declared, your package will be empty.
1d
comment Building RPM results in nothing generated in RPMS directory
Can you post the whole output from rpmbuild -ba?
1d
comment How can I use different kerberos principals for sudo than for system-auth?
Oh, I see what you're saying now. I read too quickly and I thought you meant using SSSD to restrict a service to a particular Kerb domain. This sounds promising.
2d
comment How can I use different kerberos principals for sudo than for system-auth?
I can configure pam_krb5 to restrict a service to a particular domain as well, so I'm not sure I'm buying anything by using pam_sssd. And I'm not sure if I can do custom mappings on a per-domain level (I inferred from my reading of the man page that mappings is a global configuration option). I like this idea, though. I'll look into it and see if it leads anywhere.
2d
asked How can I use different kerberos principals for sudo than for system-auth?
May
18
accepted sed - print and branch
May
18
comment sed - print and branch
thanks, after seeing your answer and then reading through the sed documentation again, this is now obvious! can't believe I didn't think of it before :P
May
18
comment sed - print and branch
thanks, the quick edits made it a bit tricky to write accurate comments :) in any case sed -n '/PostScript/p; //b; /text/!p' is what has been working for me.
May
18
comment sed - print and branch
sed -n '/PostScript/p;b; /text/!p' doesn't work for me with GNU sed version 4.1.5. This expression only prints lines that contain the pattern PostScript (presumably because it unconditionally branches to the end of the expression after running /PostScript/p).
May
18
asked sed - print and branch
May
14
revised Compiling Python 3.4.3 error
fixed code formatting
May
14
suggested approved edit on Compiling Python 3.4.3 error
May
1
comment udev rule for usb attach/detach not triggering
I think I did, but to be honest, it's been a couple years and I don't really remember well. This was just a little toy that I was working on, and I don't have the box around any more.
Apr
21
comment Shall I save my crontab file in /tmp?
ok, well, poke around. check your man page for your cron implementation or documentation for your distro. i don't have magic answers for you; this kind of thing is not universal.
Apr
20
comment Shall I save my crontab file in /tmp?
crontabs are per user. to verify that your cronjob runs, you can check the cron logs. typically in /var/log/cron.log, but it could be other locations as well.
Apr
20
revised Shall I save my crontab file in /tmp?
added 78 characters in body