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seen Feb 5 at 16:40

Jan
27
awarded  Scholar
Jan
27
accepted The relationship between execute permission on a directory and its inode structure
Jan
24
comment Can a user brute-force a directory listing without having read permission on the directory?
Tripleee, yes, nesting restricted directories does increase obscurity, not security, but a user trying by brute force to find out which subdirectories he has permissions to access is a different situation than a user being able to obtain a list of existing subdirectories, irrespective of their permissions.
Jan
24
awarded  Supporter
Jan
24
comment Can a user brute-force a directory listing without having read permission on the directory?
Schaiba, just to elaborate: If a user can generate a list of file names (this is the brute-force part) and test each one, the error message could be used to filter the list so it only contains existing subdirectories.
Jan
24
revised Can a user brute-force a directory listing without having read permission on the directory?
deleted 3 characters in body
Jan
24
awarded  Student
Jan
24
comment Can a user brute-force a directory listing without having read permission on the directory?
Schaiba, those are two different kinds of information: In neither case can the user access the subdirectory, but he can tell whether or not the subdirectory exists at all by the error message, which, if it's true, completely bypasses the read permission bit on the parent directory.
Jan
24
asked Can a user brute-force a directory listing without having read permission on the directory?
Jan
22
awarded  Editor
Jan
22
revised The relationship between execute permission on a directory and its inode structure
Clarified point 5, which was an invalid assumption as originally worded.
Jan
17
answered Why are .so files executable?
Jan
17
answered The relationship between execute permission on a directory and its inode structure
Jan
17
comment The relationship between execute permission on a directory and its inode structure
bahamat, thank you for your reply. I know that execute on a directory allows you to set the current working directory there (I acknowledged that in my question), but I'm talking about the underlying data structures. Essentially, I'm asking, why can you obtain a listing without the ability to look up the directory's inode number?
Jan
17
comment The relationship between execute permission on a directory and its inode structure
jordanm, thank you for your reply. System calls may take path names, but whether or not the call is permitted depends on the permissions of the inodes. Regarding your example, can you be more specific? Are you talking about hard links, symlinks, or something else? Also, it seems that what you claim means this (read.cs.ucla.edu/111/_media/notes/inode.jpg) is wrong, correct?
Jan
17
awarded  Teacher
Jan
17
answered How to solve the issue that a Terminal screen is messed up? (usually after a resizing)
Jan
17
asked The relationship between execute permission on a directory and its inode structure