380 reputation
16
bio website google.com
location North Pole
age 15
visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen Dec 17 '13 at 18:18

Prefers to stay anonymous and eat mousse au chocolat.


Dec
23
awarded  Yearling
Dec
17
comment Root access that can't change root password?
Which is why I stated that in my first sentence: "screws up ... other than that, you trust ... fully". This is really only a "support access" solution; not a security feature. Using additional root ssh keys achieves the same, without being hackish.
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
comment Root access that can't change root password?
In fact, it's even documented in FreeBSD (with the suggestion to also having a different, statically linked, shell on that account): freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/faq/…
Dec
16
comment Root access that can't change root password?
@alexis That is what IMHO the author of the question asked for. Why give -1 for this? toor recovery accounts has been a common practise (although frowned upon) on Unix for decades.
Dec
16
awarded  Commentator
Dec
16
comment Root access that can't change root password?
That is what I'm saying. You can use the toor password to log in, even when the main admin changed the primary root password. SELinux could prevent the user from really changing the password, but it requires much more effort to setup and administrate.
Dec
16
answered Root access that can't change root password?
Dec
16
comment Root access that can't change root password?
WHY do you need sudo for these users. If you don't trust them, don't give them sudo access in the first place. Also note that ideally, root should not have a password at all, but you should use other means of authenticating. (Which the user will still be able to "hack", even if you would protext /etc/passwd)
Dec
16
comment Root access that can't change root password?
root can edit the "other location" after sudo.
Jun
11
revised How to stop the executing process in Linux
added 94 characters in body
Jun
11
comment How to stop the executing process in Linux
Why this hack with grep -v grep? OUCH. man pkill! (Much smarter solutions have been posted hours ago!)
Jun
11
comment How to stop the executing process in Linux
Not so much as user, with a safe pattern such as ping when you don't know your way around anyway. ;-) But yes, it's best to test with pgrep first.
Jun
11
answered How to stop the executing process in Linux
Mar
1
comment Why are my application.desktop files not showing up in Linux application menu?
Do you by chance have another ezdm.desktop somewhere, for example in $HOME/.local/share/applications/ezdm.desktop?
Feb
28
answered Why are my application.desktop files not showing up in Linux application menu?
Feb
25
revised Installing JDK 7 on debian
added 97 characters in body
Feb
25
comment Installing JDK 7 on debian
@MajidAzimi sure it does: packages.debian.org/wheezy/openjdk-7-jdk - you should however make sure to get version 7u3-2.1.6-1 which includes the recent security fixes.
Dec
27
comment Swap usage too high?
I found Chrome pretty much unusable with just 1 GB of RAM. Sure it is fast and has sandboxing, put you pay for that with memory intensiveness. But that wouldn't explain why your system uses 900 MB for caching.
Dec
27
answered Swap usage too high?