781 reputation
412
bio website linkedin.com/in/melburslan
location Land of Eternal Sunshine, a.k.a. Southern California
age
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Nov 24 at 23:22

Things you may want to know about me:

  • I'm YAUG (Yet Another UNIX Guy)
  • I question authority but respect it where it is due
  • I am an EE with Bachelors and Masters degrees but in IT field by choice for the last 20+ years.
  • HPUX was my first love but nowadays it is Linux, more than anything else.
  • I love snow skiing, the alpine style
  • I will eventually end up doing something with pets, let it be a no-kill shelter, or a care facility or a combination of both. I love animals more than most of the people I know.

Nov
16
awarded  Yearling
Nov
7
answered Re-order text on each line in a file
Jul
22
comment how to verify if root password changed correctly
@UlrichDangel: unfortunately, expect is a luxury that we do not have deployed across the enterprise and I can not decide wily-nilly to deploy it without going through a rigorous vetting process, which may take in the order of months, with a strong probability of denial.
Jul
22
comment how to verify if root password changed correctly
@HBruijn: I am not planning to bury the clear text password into the script. It will be placed in a file for the duration of the script run, where and when it will be read from file and assigned to a variable, and be destroyed after test is complete and the temporary file will be removed manually. I know it is not bullet-proof but being in a quite bit fortified security environment, I think I can take that much of risk for a short period of testing time.
Jul
22
awarded  Student
Jul
22
asked how to verify if root password changed correctly
Jul
21
comment How can I assign an initial/default password to a user in Linux?
Yes, I used this many times but, as with almost any other command, it is not the defacto solution to the problem at hand. Some variations of passwd binary, do not support the --stdin switch.
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
11
awarded  Caucus
Mar
5
comment Sudo changes PATH, yet executes the same binary
In your PATH, /usr/local/bin preceeds /usr/bin. I think it is somehow expected to stop the search and run the executable once it is found. And the location it gets to be found is /usr/local/bin the first time. Unless of course your sudo was compiled with a different default PATH
Mar
5
comment replacement script multiple targets
possible duplicate of case sensitive substitution; same target ids
Mar
5
comment Configuring a tftp server for multiple clients
Together with not being totally confident with this statement, I think you will need to run multiple tftpd instances with different root directory configurations as well as different ip addresses, as tftp is pretty dumb at what it does, hence the "t" at the beginning for "trivial". I saw this article a while ago. You might want to take a look at it: selbytech.com/2009/10/…
Feb
24
comment rsync multiple files to multiple directories
I have never used the --inplace switch but seems like it updates and existing file on the destination. And if your destination is, somehow forcing a confirmation, i.e. hit 'y' or 'n', that might explain why it is hanging. Try making the destination file names such that they will not exists in ther detination location and see if your script will proceed w/o needing a ctrl-c etc. Just a troubleshooting suggestion, not intended to be a solution.
Feb
22
comment Directory mounted under regular user is inaccessible from said user
I am not really familiar with sshfs but since ssh itself is in the mix, it is helpful, if not mandatory to check the ownership permissions of .ssh directory and its contents. ls -ld ~/.ssh and ls -l ~/.ssh outputs may give some useful information.
Nov
18
comment Using alias in another script (ksh)
to reiterate some of the sentiment above, using aliases in a script is a bad idea from the get-go. if you know what that alias is running, why don't you do something like this : (say alias is as such "mycmnd=/usr/sbin/grep") in your script you can use MYCOMMAND=/usr/sbin/grep and then everytime you need to use this command, you can reference it by $MYCOMMAND.
Nov
18
answered Ksh script warnings
Nov
16
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
comment viewing variable values in a KSH script
if you don't use braces, you are letting the shell take over your variable expansion with the characters on the command line following the variable nae without a known delimiter. IT IS ALWAYS SAFER TO USE CURLY BRACKETS. Usage of double quotes on the other hand, is up to the user, knowing the nature of values, his or her variables can take. If you are dealing with numeric variables and values of the numerals, in the same context you downed my idea, what is the use of double quotes ? If you are doing string evaluation, yes they are of some use.
Nov
4
answered viewing variable values in a KSH script
Oct
28
answered How to check whether my cron job for backup using tar was succesfull