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Jul
27
comment Why don't most common Linux package managers allow package installation for normal users?
It might be that I committed a duplicate: unix.stackexchange.com/q/5535/26489
Jul
27
comment Why don't most common Linux package managers allow package installation for normal users?
@steve: That's closer to what I want, but I wish there was something like this for yum or apt-get rather than rpm or dpkg. Having dependencies install themselves is nice.
Jul
27
comment Why don't most common Linux package managers allow package installation for normal users?
@steve: You're missing the point. I'm asking about installing the packages in my home directory.
Jul
27
comment Why don't most common Linux package managers allow package installation for normal users?
Yes and/or why was it decided not to include such functionality.
Jun
20
comment monitor files (ala tail -f) in an entire directory (even new ones)
I would suggest -Q instead of -q.
Jan
21
comment How to disable procps-ng 3.3.10 free wide output format?
@jofel: it would, but my free doesn't seem to have one.
Nov
6
comment Which directory is taking up the most space
@TenLeftFingers: if you think that this answers your problem to a bigger degree than a currently accepted answer, please consider accepting this instead.
Nov
6
comment How to recompress 2 million gzip files without storing them twice?
Any compression program would do. If I can create a tar file of the decompressed-but-not-stored files, I can pipe it to any other program.
Nov
6
comment How to recompress 2 million gzip files without storing them twice?
@Anthon: not on this machine, but for the future readers we might assume that yes.
Nov
6
comment How to recompress 2 million gzip files without storing them twice?
@CristianCiupitu: I measured without |gzip and the uncompressed file didn't basically touch the HDD, so IMHO it shouldn't be THAT slow.
Oct
3
comment Redirect stderr to a file, but create only if any stderr happened?
First you need to trace down the bug.
Oct
3
comment Redirect stderr to a file, but create only if any stderr happened?
@peterph: in my case it is usually some kind of a bug.
Oct
3
comment Redirect stderr to a file, but create only if any stderr happened?
@don_crissti: I'm not exactly satisfied by this solution, but thanks anyway.
Oct
3
comment Redirect stderr to a file, but create only if any stderr happened?
I'd expect it to be more complex in the working case since you'd have to be looking at a particular temporary file and as I said, I'd rather prevent empty stderr files from being created at all.
Oct
3
comment Redirect stderr to a file, but create only if any stderr happened?
I'd prefer to monitor logs on the fly and empty files make it less convenient.
Jul
12
comment How can I tell why I have permissions to read a file?
Whoops, looks like you're right. I just assumed that it shouldn't be world-readable and didn't even read the permissions. Silly me. Voting to close.
Apr
22
comment Is `cal` broken? What happened in September 1752?
...what's wrong with the output again? :p
Apr
10
comment Copy a local file to a remote server, non-root privileges over sudo?
@sim: turning it around would be an option, but let's assume that there's no SSH server on the local machine. About the rsync trick - is it safe? Can the passwordless rsync be taken advantage of in order to escalate privileges using some command-line switch?
Mar
18
comment The ls command is not working for a directory with a huge number of files
You can tune that limit while creating the filesystem, but still - as far as I know, most filesystems aren't optimized for handling millions of files in a single directory. I suggest to split them.
Mar
18
comment The ls command is not working for a directory with a huge number of files
By the way, storing millions of files in a single directory is a rather bad idea. If you control the directory layout, perhaps split it by some criteria?