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13h
answered Make does not compile modules. Error: Building modules, stage 2. MODPOST 0 modules
14h
asked Xorg configuration hook for unblank screen
1d
comment Making Linux read swap back into memory
That's two of us saying exactly the same thing at the same time ;)
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asked Rsyslog `logger` message duplicated
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answered Rsyslog `logger` message duplicated
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comment What is `/tmp/.X11-unix/`?
@Max I stand corrected! Although it is not for the reasons cited by Bruce, but because of the overhead for the kernel's TCP stack.
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comment What is `/tmp/.X11-unix/`?
Not to nitpick but I doubt a unix local socket has any performance advantages over a local TCP socket (which doesn't use a hardware interface, and is also 100% kernel).
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comment Show List of USB device to know name /dev/?
...Better yet, someone could write an application to do so. Sans any of these, this is really a debugging stategy and nb. it did lead the OP to solution based on the debugging of an error made by the OP.
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comment Show List of USB device to know name /dev/?
I'd agree this is not the ideal solution, in that sense that an ideal solution could be one that does not exist (e.g., to go to an extreme, I subvocalize a request for information and it is instantly displayed holographically before me...). However, I disagree that with the assertion that it's "not an appropriate solution". I'm sure there is a more decisive way to do this if you want to parse and correlate stuff in /sys, and if someone takes the time to write an answer doing so, they have my vote...
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comment Environment variables. Where are they saved in?
Yeah; the file you are thinking of is probably /proc/[PID]/environ.
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comment Environment variables. Where are they saved in?
@terdon Nothing's stored anywhere in /proc. It's an interface to the kernel, which manages the process images. When you read a file there, it amounts to asking the kernel for information, which it retrieves from memory and provides.
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awarded  Nice Answer
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comment Environment variables. Where are they saved in?
Yes, they are only in memory unless they've been intentionally saved somewhere -- which some of them usually are. The shell has a number of files it will potentially source (see e.g. INVOCATION in man bash).
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comment Environment variables. Where are they saved in?
This is correct. The copy comes from the fork() system call, which creates a new process by duplicating the one that started it. That process image is then largely replaced by the exec() system call, but the environment variables are retained. Some other details here: unix.stackexchange.com/a/123390/25985
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comment Show List of USB device to know name /dev/?
@Cerin You're just wrong. There is nothing bad about unplugging and plugging in USB devices. That's what USB is intended for. It is not a PCI slot. When a USB device is plugged in, the kernel knows about it, the device ID is communicated, and it will look to see if a driver is available for that device. If so, it is loaded, and the driver may create a /dev node. Then when the device is removed, the driver should remove the device node.
Apr
15
comment Is there a way to make nice (process priority) values survive a reboot?
Modifying the init scripts is easy enough (just stick nice appropriately into the start section) -- just beware that (presumably) they might occasionally be replaced on upgrade.
Apr
15
comment Is there a way to make nice (process priority) values survive a reboot?
I added the sysvinit tag presuming that's what's starting mumble, samba etc., although I don't think it has a mechanism to do this.
Apr
15
revised Is there a way to make nice (process priority) values survive a reboot?
edited tags
Apr
13
answered Any good way to detect a misnamed config file?
Apr
12
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