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14h
comment How to find out what caused lag/freeze and self-reboot?
For me here (Fedora 20) FF uses ~2-3x as much CPU as Chrome on that page, both of them spread across several cores, but nothing crippling -- this might imply it's a display driver. Pretty sure there's no flash on that page, BTW.
18h
comment How to find out what caused lag/freeze and self-reboot?
There's not a clear explanation there, but you can see the ethernet disconnects then reconnects, then the keyboard does the same thing, then then the mouse does it four times, interlaced with the login process on tty1 being killed and respawned (init will do this). Is this reproducible, i.e., if you go back to that Apple page now does it happen again? You should run a CPU monitor somewhere so that when this happens, you can get some idea of what the usage is. Presuming you were the one killing the login over and over, the rest of it might be explained by some kind of hardware fault.
20h
comment How to find out what caused lag/freeze and self-reboot?
BTW, I have CPU usage problems on some flash pages with firefox. You should try this with flash disabled.
20h
comment How to find out what caused lag/freeze and self-reboot?
Try grep "oom-killer" /var/log/syslog and if that shows nothing try grep -i oom ... just to be sure. You're checking to see if this was an out of memory (oom) issue; that shouldn't shut the system down but it will freeze it for a bit. Regardless, whatever there is from syslog for that time period, if it looks at all relevant add it to your post.
21h
comment How to find out what caused lag/freeze and self-reboot?
Which web browser is this? How many cores does the machine have?
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revised Strace - Filedescriptor 3
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revised Running Deamon Involving GPIO on Pi
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revised Running Deamon Involving GPIO on Pi
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answered Running Deamon Involving GPIO on Pi
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comment Strace - Filedescriptor 3
Not quite. They are both userland actions, but the actual system call invokes invokes the kernel. For example, if you run a debugger on C code that uses open() on GNU/Linux and try to step through it, there's almost nothing there (it ends at a line in an asm source, T_PSEUDO (SYSCALL_SYMBOL, SYSCALL_NAME, SYSCALL_NARGS)). That's the point where execution switches from user to kernel mode. The API wrappers are actually a wrapper on this, written to conform to the linux kernel API. So they are a bridge between a portable, *nix wide standard (POSIX) and a particular implementation (linux).
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revised Strace - Filedescriptor 3
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answered Strace - Filedescriptor 3
Jul
25
revised Howto make hibernation work under Fedora 19
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Jul
24
comment Over-provisioning an SSD - does it still hold?
The only sense in which the OS would matter is the performance of a particular filesystem (e.g. ext4) at a particular level -- but in this case the kind of hardware is irrelevant, the logic is the same for spinning disks and SSDs. That's a distinctly different question. I can't migrate it, BTW, I just saw it in the "close" queue, otherwise I wouldn't have cared.
Jul
24
reviewed Leave Open Grouping lines into heterogeneous subsets
Jul
24
reviewed Leave Open Disabling ssh password authentication does not work on my debian VPS
Jul
24
reviewed Close Over-provisioning an SSD - does it still hold?
Jul
24
comment Over-provisioning an SSD - does it still hold?
This question is off-topic here; it belongs on Super User.
Jul
24
reviewed Leave Open Why the number is rounded over ssh?