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comment How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
@Gilles I was thinking more about the first version, particularly since there's nothing in the question as asked about renaming files. The original (grace period edited) version of this answer had only the rename command suggestion.
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comment How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
@rMistero There's no rule against posting another answer just because an answer has been accepted. In fact, I think you should, especially since the semantics of what you are proposing are different. That said, this is the way to do what the OP said having tried, so even if there are other results that could also be valid, I believe it is safe to assume that this is in line with what the OP wanted to accomplish.
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revised How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
Fix syntax error, add proper syntax highlighting
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comment How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
I still think invoking Perl once for each file is overkill, but at least now this gives an answer to the question. :)
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revised How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
added 32 characters in body
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revised How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
Better title, better tags
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answered How to do more than one substring replace at once in bash?
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comment What are the 3 flavours in ubuntu 14.04 LTS?
@Rinzwind There is a 2 GB barrier based on addresses >= 0x80000000 (2 GiB) being reserved for the kernel, causing RAM above that address to become unaddressable. I don't recall whether i386 Linux uses 0x80000000, 0xC0000000 (3 GiB) or even 0xE0000000 (3.5 GiB) as the cutoff point, but some degree of address space needs to be reserved for kernel use. Same reason why 32-bit Windows has a /3GB boot switch, moving the cutoff point from 2 GiB to 3 GiB.
Apr
8
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
7
comment ls --color: how to color executable hard links?
"There is currently no way of coloring hardlinked executables differently than non-hardlinked executables" That's because every single file is hardlinked. Quoting Wikipedia: "In computing, a hard link is a directory entry that associates a name with a file on a file system.". Note a name, not another name.
Apr
4
comment Listing all devices as non-superuser
@NikitaYashtaev Regular (non-root) users shouldn't have access to the raw device nodes, even read-only, in the first place. External drives seem to be a special case (at least on Debian, those appear to be mode 1660 owner root:floppy, rather than 1660 root:disk as for internal drives.)
Mar
31
comment Caching write changes on SSD to avoid HDD spin-up? ZFS, but (probably) not L2ARC
ZFS doesn't care about the type of storage media, so you get the same sort of guarantees that you'd get using a traditional HDD in the same manner.
Mar
31
comment Get space details without drive names
@Abhishekdotpy On Debian at least, it's provided by the mount package which should definitely be installed.
Mar
31
comment Get space details without drive names
At least the df from coreutils 8.12.197-032bb does not have that option, so it must be pretty new. (That's the version Debian Wheezy currently ships.) Looks useful, though.
Mar
31
comment Caching write changes on SSD to avoid HDD spin-up? ZFS, but (probably) not L2ARC
"if an old mail gets corrupted on the SSD, the error will propagate to the array" Are you saying you aren't running ZFS on the SSD?
Mar
31
comment What does $# mean in shell?
@NoName You can man almost anything, including man itself. Also try apropos some time.
Mar
28
comment death_handler: Fatal signal 15 received
Which distribution and distribution version are you on? (For example, Fedora 19, Debian 7.1, ...)
Mar
28
comment Postfix: restrict all external access but allow for only mynetworks
This question doesn't make any sense to me at least. A recipient domain doesn't belong in mynetworks or not, it just is. You can match the connecting IP against mynetworks using e.g. permit_mynetworks, but that's about the best you can do with only Postfix. You could write a custom policy service and use that, which could implement basically arbitrary business logic for accepting/rejecting a mail transaction; is that what you are after? If it is, please edit your question to indicate that.
Mar
27
comment Extract only the key(s) from GPG exported keypair
That is absolutely correct, Eero. The reason for my asking that is that sometimes (many times), even when an effort can (and should!) be broken down into separate questions, having some idea of the overall goal can lead to better answers than looking only at the individual question-parts themselves.
Mar
26
comment Export format of gpg
Is this related to Extract only the key(s) from GPG exported keypair?