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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 44 votes cast
Jan
6
revised Can a bash array be used in place of eval set — “$params”?
Simplified the input that provokes the bug and added a comment on a non-working "bugfix"
Jan
6
comment Can a bash array be used in place of eval set — “$params”?
@Wildcard The rest looks fine.
Jan
5
comment Can a bash array be used in place of eval set — “$params”?
@Wildcard yes, you're right, the double quotes or the spaces are unnecessary, since the script tries to protect $param with double quotes, and backticks are evaluated even within double quotes. If $param were protected with single quote, one would need a more complicated argument.
Jan
5
answered Can a bash array be used in place of eval set — “$params”?
Nov
24
revised How to only substitute lines that match several patterns in sed?
typo fixed
Sep
28
awarded  Yearling
Sep
8
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
7
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
7
answered Why does a unquoted wildcard work remotely with scp?
Mar
9
comment Not getting grep with a variable
Hint 1: Count your parentheses. Hint 2: The $(echo part is pointless; n=$(( (RANDOM%6) +1)) is sufficient. Hint 3: A pipe | creates child processes that run essentially in parallel. Do you think it makes sense to execute these two commands in parallel?
Dec
10
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Nov
23
answered regex - Searching for only character pairs
Nov
5
answered How to see manpage of previous command?
Nov
1
revised Match a whole word (IP address) using `sed`
added 5 characters in body
Nov
1
revised Match a whole word (IP address) using `sed`
Added sed solution using extended regexps
Nov
1
comment Match a whole word (IP address) using `sed`
@terdon The original question is unclear. Essentially, the OP asks two questions that should have different solutions. After the example, he says that he wants to match No. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 (where 1.2.3.4 is potentially preceded or followed by a letter), but not 3 and 5 (where 1.2.3.4 is preceded or followed by a number, resulting in a different IP). So it seems that iaaNEWIPad (from No. 4) is indeed an expected result. If not, the OP should make his question more precise.
Nov
1
revised Match a whole word (IP address) using `sed`
perl solution added
Nov
1
revised Match a whole word (IP address) using `sed`
deleted 2 characters in body
Nov
1
answered Match a whole word (IP address) using `sed`