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comment Using a generated list of filenames as argument list — with spaces
Thanks for all the trouble but your basic premise ignores the fact that bash normally uses an elaborate system of quote processing. But not in backquote expansion. Compare the following (which both give errors, but show the difference): ls "what is this" vs. ls `echo '"what is this"'` . Someone neglected to implement quote processing for the result of backquotes.
May
13
comment Execute script after outbound ssh
Which computer needs to know this? Do you want the running shell in B to know that it really originated in C, or something else? Do you have the user's cooperation, or are you trying to catch users who do this? And do you have root access to some of these computers?
May
13
comment Remove special pattern ^M from script which got appended after FTP from windows to Unix
Just to be clear: The ^M were there all along. It's part of how Windows ends lines, so on Windows you just see a newline. You can ask ftp to remove them during the transfer by activating ascii mode.
May
13
comment Unexplained files found in home folder
To compare the contents, I would just do an ls -R > listing.txt on the remote computer, fetch it, and diff the two listings. As a start you can sort both lists alphabetically and diff (the sorted lists won't show where the files are, but once you have a match you can search in the original listing).
May
6
comment How to “cat /etc/shadow” on an HMC?
In the dawn of time the password was in /etc/passwd, which was (and still is) world-readable. Hence the name, of course. Back then it seemed that the one-way encryption algorithm (use the password as the key to encrypt a constant string) was strong enough that there was no danger of brute-forcing. Eventually this was no longer a reasonable assumption, and since /etc/passwd is used to look up user names, the password was moved to a new unreadable location.
May
6
revised Storing shell scripts
added 8 characters in body
May
6
comment Storing shell scripts
Looks good. Your advice about leaving scripts elsewhere and linking is often appropriate, you could explain more (and add the ln -s while you're at it).
May
6
answered Storing shell scripts
May
6
comment Storing shell scripts
The applications are hiding their state by putting it in the dotted directory .local/share, but your bin is part of your operating environment-- of course it's not data but it's also not noise. As you can see from the other answers, the standard location is ~/bin. I actually use several directories depending on what it is, but none of them are hidden.
May
6
comment Storing shell scripts
Most of it is good advice, but why bother hiding your bin in .local? The standard location for these things is $HOME/bin.
May
3
comment Replacing string with value of variable using sed or awk
Which part is not working? How are you running this script?
Apr
21
awarded  Custodian
Apr
21
reviewed Reject How to install a C compiler on Linux?
Apr
21
revised Linux shell script to automate user creation
added 146 characters in body
Apr
21
revised Linux shell script to automate user creation
added 86 characters in body
Apr
21
answered Linux shell script to automate user creation
Apr
15
comment Responding to prompts automatically?
Yes there is, but two-way communication is not straightforward-- too easy to get stuck. Ask more specifically about the programming language you are interested in.
Apr
15
revised How to Remove Strings between two Parenthesis in Unix
added 157 characters in body
Apr
15
revised How to Remove Strings between two Parenthesis in Unix
added 157 characters in body
Apr
15
comment How to Remove Strings between two Parenthesis in Unix
What do you mean you "have to"? Perl is as much part of unix as sed. If you want something that fits on the commandline, I've added a version.