1,858 reputation
512
bio website k.japko.eu
location Wrocław, Poland
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Aug 19 at 13:07

Linux system engineer, kernel developer and computer geek.


Sep
17
revised How is this sed command working?
added 126 characters in body
Sep
17
comment How is this sed command working?
Definitively. I can't provide all the detail about sed in this answer as I would have to rewrite the whole manual. I will add this as a note to this question since it indeed may be confusing in some cases.
Sep
17
comment How is this sed command working?
Yes, this is true. In other words d command not only removes the line from current buffer but since there is nothing in it, there's not much point in continuing with more commands. This is why it ignores the rest of them and starts from first command with the next line.
Sep
17
answered Backing up partition using dd and changing files
Sep
17
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Understanding backtick (`)
Sep
17
revised Understanding backtick (`)
spelling correction; added explaination about using useless cat
Sep
17
revised Understanding backtick (`)
added 598 characters in body
Sep
17
answered Understanding backtick (`)
Sep
17
answered How is this sed command working?
Sep
16
comment Adding a new System call to Linux 3.2.x with a loadable kernel module
I believe that this question is much more related to Linux as an OS than to programming itself. It is also quite important to know what are the possibilities of extending our system abilities and what are its limits. This, for example, makes you understand why some features are not possible to implement as loadable module and needs kernel patching. Knowing why it is like this may also give you some ideas of security vs usability kernel developers have to make. Would that question be more on topic if OP would ask only if it's possible and why not and not how to implements this?
Sep
15
answered Modifying TG3 Broadcom driver
Sep
15
comment I ran rm -rf. Need to recover files
The most important information that is missing is which filesystem are you using.
Sep
15
answered Run Script once a day with systemd
Sep
15
comment Run Script once a day with systemd
I may be wrong but there's no easy way to set anacron to run script only 10 minutes after boot is complete.
Sep
15
comment Is Mandatory Access Control overkill for a desktop/lightweight server?
I believe it's starting to be discussion instead of Q&A. I just don't see how hardware address space randomization could work nor I can see how this is related to specifically x86 architecture or unix or even MAC. I can't image situation where address space is not predictable for kernel or even userspace. It may differ on each system but can't be random.
Sep
14
comment Is Mandatory Access Control overkill for a desktop/lightweight server?
It has nothing to do with interrupt handling. Also it's not normally possible to gain root privileges while exploiting some application run as non root user. Unless there's some security flaw in your system. The privilege separation in Unix was a little simplified, however. Root could do everything and normal user could do little and there was nothing in between. This was (and very often is even now) source of many security problems and MAC is trying to address them.
Sep
14
comment Is Mandatory Access Control overkill for a desktop/lightweight server?
I believe you answered yourself in your last paragraph. Since most of distributions do not offer MAC, it is not strictly required and your system may be considered save without it. It's just another level of security. I believe that there is no one valid answer to your question as everybody will probably have hes own opinion.
Sep
14
comment Run Script once a day with systemd
I don't fully understand your requirements, please clarify. I understand that if you reboot your machine serveral times in a day, the script should only run after first reboot, is that right? If your machine runs for more than 1 day long, should the script be run in consecutive days?
Sep
14
awarded  Analytical
Sep
14
answered Adding a new System call to Linux 3.2.x with a loadable kernel module