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Jan
30
comment How does Linux “kill” a process?
I'd add that since a kill -9 can't be caught, a process receiving it can't perform any cleanup (e.g. removing temporary files, freeing shared memory, etc.) before it exits. Hence, use kill -9 (a.k.a kill -kill) only as a last resort. Begin with a kill -hup and/or kill -term first and then use kill -kill as the final blow.
Jan
28
answered set umask (permissions) similarly as setgid on a directory
Jan
14
awarded  Custodian
Jan
14
reviewed Approve What are the legitimate uses of the `touch` command?
Jan
14
comment How to identify executable path with its PID on AIX 5 or more
I disagree specifically over point-3. Again, my disclaimer: I don't currently have access to an AIX machine. I would hope that you found something useful in my offerings, regardless.
Jan
14
comment How to identify executable path with its PID on AIX 5 or more
Copy your executable to any directory; cd to the directory and launch the executable with a relative path. You can't assume anything.
Jan
13
awarded  Mortarboard
Jan
13
comment What are the legitimate uses of the `touch` command?
@Geek The manpages are your friend :-)
Jan
13
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
answered What are the legitimate uses of the `touch` command?
Jan
7
answered Why can users delete each others files in this case
Jan
1
answered What are the special characters to print from a script to move the cursor?
Nov
28
comment How do you find what keys the “erase” and “line-kill” characters are in Ubuntu?
@sim : Point well taken; done with thanks.
Nov
28
revised How do you find what keys the “erase” and “line-kill” characters are in Ubuntu?
Expand answer with examples.
Nov
28
answered How do you find what keys the “erase” and “line-kill” characters are in Ubuntu?
Nov
23
answered What command should I run after making changes to /etc/passwd file
Nov
20
revised lsof: show files open as read-write
Add more direct answer showing output parsing
Nov
20
revised lsof: show files open as read-write
added 14 characters in body
Nov
20
answered lsof: show files open as read-write