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Jan
16
answered How to tell Linux Kernel > 3.0 to completely ignore a failing disk?
Jan
16
comment How to tell Linux Kernel > 3.0 to completely ignore a failing disk?
@Rmano Are you kidding me? The system would never ask for a password! Nor would Linux ... ever. It would just behave as if the drive was badly broken (flooding screen with timing errors etc.). I am not talking about an encrypted drive. If you security-lock a hard drive by password (e. g. with hdparm under Linux), it will most likely not operate on Windows at all (probably not even be detected). Until it gets unlocked again (temporarily (UNLOCK) or permanently (DISPWD))
Jan
16
comment How to tell Linux Kernel > 3.0 to completely ignore a failing disk?
@Rmano Joining late to the party, but OK...what you've reported ("error on each an every I/O operation") can even happen with a 100% perfect drive, when ... security locked! Once experienced with hdparm, which, after finishing its --security-erase, does not reliably remove the security lock from the drive after doing its work (unless by a cold reboot). However, after issuing a DISPWD on that drive (system rescue CD), it behaved just greatly and there were no errors. So beware of those drives locked by security password!! At least make sure your SSD drive doesn't have LOCK enabled.
Jan
16
comment How to tell Linux Kernel > 3.0 to completely ignore a failing disk?
Another big thanks goes to the Linux kernel team for speedily including a patch into a stable kernel release, probably helping 10,000 people that way with similar problems.
Dec
30
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
21
awarded  Revival
Dec
18
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
17
revised E: sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) while updating php
added 76 characters in body
Dec
17
revised E: sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) while updating php
added 15 characters in body
Dec
17
answered E: sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) while updating php
Dec
16
comment What is the purpose of the lost+found folder in Linux and Unix?
@JohanE You're telling me. However, the actual reason why I posted my comment was because this answer was trying to suggest us to "be thankful" for lost+found. This felt way too hilarious to be true (I sat here with a broad grin), for the ridiculously few times when we're thankful for it can't compete with those when we'd rather be able to cast a "Begone!" spell to this nuisant lo+fo thing.
Nov
25
comment How to count the number of a specific character in each line?
@AmelioVazquez-Reina It cannot work, by design. Translated into human-readable prose, s/[^,,]//g means: find everything that is not a comma and remove it. Note that this is a [^character]construction, which excludes the character following the caret ^. This should explain why your multiple commas are ignored and interpreted as one single one.
Nov
21
comment hexdump: How to suppress offset column in hex mode
Well, this gets even more interesting. Though you said that the -x option triggers the offset column, hexdump appears to use it per default in some cases. That is, if the only argument to hexdumpis the filename, offset column will be displayed too! Yes, without specifying -x. (Just figured that out.)
Nov
21
comment hexdump: How to suppress offset column in hex mode
Thanks! Though it almost feels embarrassing now, there is a good reason why I didn't get that first time. First of all, I come from od times (when the hexdump|hd tool didn't even exist) - and the -x option meant hex mode (since od's default mode is octal). Second, the man page of hexdump reads "Two-byte hexadecimal mode" for its -x option. The offset thing is just hidden away in the following text, but I thought, hey, 2B hex mode, that's just what I'm in need of here. :)
Nov
20
asked hexdump: How to suppress offset column in hex mode
Nov
20
comment Sorting the output of “find”?
The problem with all these |sort solutions is that you cannot use -exec any longer. OK, although it is possible to rewrite your statement given to -exec so that it works with xargs, the question is, what about "mini-scripts"? (sh -c ...) I wouldn't call that trivial to transform a 'sh -c' mini-script with multiple commands so that it can work with xargs (if possible at all, that is)
Nov
15
comment How to detect end of line with sed
@don_crissti Glad you did! So at least it has been confirmed that sed will take a particular option that has not been properly documented yet. This always comes in handy; if no one is aware about the lack of documentation, nobody will ever fix it.
Nov
15
comment How to detect end of line with sed
@don_crissti Well, I thought you've been on this network long enough to know that there is no way to unbold parts of a comment (unless you rewrite it entirely). So let me correct to: GNU sed may "silently" support -E, but it is not documented in the manpage (nor in the Texinfo manual (checked both)). Hence I assumed it is not supported (which was a wrong assumption, after all). Anyways, you're right, because at least GNU sed won't complain if you use this option.
Nov
3
comment Building Qt: 'make clean' causes everything to get recompiled?
@fider Hence this question. :) QT5 is not QT4 (note QT5 must have been in a 'post-natal' state when I started this question back in 2012 :)) , so the current behavior when building v5 may differ quite a bit from the v4 behavior one got used to from the 'days of yore'.
Oct
28
comment fdupes - delete files after comparing two directories
A good addendum to this (good) answer would also be the case when bar and foo get swapped: $fdupes bar/ foo/. Because, unlike you might think, the output is likely to be the very same as in $fdupes foo/ bar/, since timestamp is the only thing it cares for, as you correctly pointed out. This can drive you totally nuts if you want to keep one folder as-is no matter what. And since fdupes can only protect the first file (top-down), the order WILL be important. Anyways, I consider any method involving grep or sed an ugly workaround for a badly-conceived tool.