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seen Aug 26 at 13:11

Aug
26
comment How can I set up Apache to use port 1 and other ports below 80?
@MD-Tech: Note that I am not advocating the "clandestine" use of reserved ports (this means confusing people which is never good, and there remain enough "legitimate" numbers you could use). But for the most part, it's "harmless" because nobody is seriously using these anyway, and if someone is indeed, you won't notice.
Aug
26
comment How can I set up Apache to use port 1 and other ports below 80?
@MD-Tech: With a grain of salt, though. A considerable range of the reserved ports is ancient cruft and total bullshit from a current day perspective. Such as e.g. port 1 TCP which the OP was trying to use, referring to a protocol exclusively used by an operating system for SGI workstations with the last release in 1998, the last maintenance update around 2005, and currently being in "officially retired" state according to the vendor. Nobody is seriously using ports 3 to 10, 13 is obsolete, 17 is useless, 11 and 19 are not used anywhere because they're built-in exploit features, etc etc.
Feb
21
comment I deleted /bin/rm. How do I recover it?
@liori: I was half-joking, though 10-15 years ago, I would probably indeed have done it in that situation (the added "features", in particular i18n, are not an advantage in my opinion -- unintellegible translations, and learning to use switches that unexpectedly break scripts on another computer, no thanks). However, nowadays, I'm happy if only a Linux system runs smoothly as-installed without me touching anything, and without having to move/delete/edit system/config files or binaries. Which sadly, still isn't the case often enough, so I'm surely not touching something that works :-)
Feb
20
comment I deleted /bin/rm. How do I recover it?
Indeed. Actually, this makes me think about deleting coreutils too... :-)
Aug
29
comment Disable changelogs
Setting the debconf priority (I didn't even know this one existed!) alone makes it go silent, thank you. That's probably the best thing to have, too. "critical" is probably something I would want to know, and otherwise it's silent, which is just as it should be.
Aug
29
awarded  Scholar
Aug
29
awarded  Supporter
Aug
29
accepted Disable changelogs
Aug
28
answered Disable changelogs
Aug
28
asked Disable changelogs
Aug
28
awarded  Teacher
Mar
12
answered Memory management principle used by Linux