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1d
comment Can't MariaDB and Mysql install on the same machine?
Are you sure you need MySQL specifically? MariaDB is meant to be a compatible replacement. (That's why the mariadb-libs package provides a libmysqlclient.so.18 file.)
Jan
26
answered Change encrypted partition UUID
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
I was hoping the name might be a little more descriptive, but as a best guess, that may refer to the EFI fallback bootloader (bootx64.efi) which is the usual way that removable media like flash drives are made bootable under EFI. Not a certainty, but it points toward the flash drive's GRUB that's running. Press Escape quickly after choosing that EFI option to try to get a GRUB menu, and see if it says "Ubuntu" or "Mint".
Dec
8
comment Massive disk corruption on Ubuntu 15.10 with dm-crypt + LUKS full disk encryption?
It wouldn't be the first time: I had corruption problems back in 2006 that turned out to be a kernel bug in dm-crypt when used on top of mdadm. I haven't had any problems (since then) with full-disk encryption in Debian, though, even with the latest kernels in the unstable branch.
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
@mikeserv, yes, Ubuntu could engineer their boot process that way. But currently they use GRUB, and the comments on a StackExchange question are not an appropriate (or sensible) place to lobby for that to change. Please take your bashing elsewhere; none of it, except maybe the link in the first comment, has been constructive in resolving the OP's problem.
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
@mikeserv, Ubuntu installs GRUB by default. Ubuntu's kernel updates run scripts that automatically regenerate grub.cfg with an entry for the new kernel. Those scripts correctly handle a variety of advanced scenarios, such as having the vmlinuz file on a RAID or LVM device. In short: Ubuntu makes GRUB "just work". The kernel's EFI stub is a neat feature, but unless the distro automates installing kernels that way, it fails the "just works" criteria that a non-expert wants.
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
@SephReed, please disregard the bashing and FUD above: there are other bootloaders out there that you may want to explore when you have the skills/experience, but GRUB works fine in general, and sticking with your distro's default bootloader is your best bet if you're not an expert. It sounds like your problem is related to EFI's NVRAM variables, but there's not enough detail in the question to determine exactly what's going on. It could also be that the GRUB on the Mint install drive is confused, and EFI isn't the culprit at all.
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
@fpmurphy1, as far as the EFI firmware is concerned, GRUB is a single file: grubx64.efi. Once that's launched, it reads other files too. But this question seems to be about the wrong copy of GRUB being launched by the firmware, so only that single file seen by EFI seems relevant.
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
@mikeserv, "wedging raw binary into the head of a disk" is how PC BIOS booting has always worked; it's not unique to GRUB. It's also not relevant to EFI. And by "bootloader" I mean things like GRUB, ELILO, and rEFInd. If you want to nitpick, let me restate: the EFI implementation of GRUB is an EFI application that gets installed just like any other EFI application.
Dec
8
comment I think Ubuntu messed up my EFI. I'm in over my head
What's the title of the boot option that only appears when the thumb drive is present? (And @mikeserv, comparing GRUB to a rootkit is deliberately misleading: it gets installed in the same way as any other bootloader. For EFI, it's a single file in the EFI system partition and a corresponding NVRAM entry.)
Nov
28
comment Install Grub2 UEFI Fat32 to EFI - No Linux OS
The UEFI version of GRUB doesn't go in the MBR, it goes in the EFI system partition. The MBR isn't involved in UEFI booting at all.
Oct
31
comment Snapshot size in lvm
Regarding your edit: the size overhead in a snapshot has nothing to do with the filesystem (or any aspect of the data) in the base volume. It's just that the snapshot has to store data copied from the base volume, plus information about which storage locations in the snapshot volume correspond to which storage locations in the base volume.
Oct
29
comment Snapshot size in lvm
Not quite. A snapshot doesn't store multiple versions of changes, so it never needs more space than the original volume. If the original volume is 30GB, there's only 30GB of data that might possibly ever need to be copied to the snapshot. (However, I think snapshots have a slight size overhead due to the way they structure the copied data, so you might need to make the snapshot slightly larger than 30GB for that reason. But it's not related to the rate of change to the original volume.)
Oct
29
answered Trying to understand lvm snapshot
Aug
28
comment Install Git offline without sudo
Maybe you shouldn't try to install software on a highly-secure computer without approval, if you can't even state a business case for why it's needed. :-)
Aug
27
answered echo and command substitution
Aug
27
comment Install Git offline without sudo
Getting sudo access yourself might be impractical, but surely the machine has an administrator who's already able to install things?
Aug
15
comment All of system ram not available on Debian OS partition
Those "older processors" are 20 years old now. A chip from 19 years ago would support PAE, but most people wouldn't consider that "recent".
Aug
12
comment Linux is reporting the CPU as too slow?
Maybe so, but boosting four cores would overheat four times as fast.
Aug
12
comment Linux is reporting the CPU as too slow?
The main limiting factor in CPU clock speed is heat production; the chip shouldn't produce heat faster than the cooling system can remove it. The idea behind Turbo Boost is that it's OK to let one core produce a bit more heat when the others are producing less. Boosting all the cores when they're all busy would lead to overheating.