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Jun
29
comment How do I get the output of a program already running?
I agree with @fredtantini, I use tail to watch a certain file, but I also use watch if I know there are multiple files in that folder that I want to keep an eye on.
Jun
19
comment Exported settings from Lacie NAS OS 4 are unreadable. How to convert to human readable?
It looks like encrypted text not in a format.
May
11
comment How to find out if Ubuntu is using DHCP (Ubuntu 12.04 LTS GUI)
This is a very long-winded answer - and only the real part in this "answer" is the last paragraph.
Mar
6
comment How to change hostname on Linux and make it appear on a network?
Ok, thanks for that @Gilles. I have had to do these steps on my Virtual Machine (CentOS), and then was able to ping the machine from my own local machine (Windows), and see the name of the VM.
Dec
3
comment LD_LIBRARY_PATH always blank after sudo
Try adding it to ~/.bashrc
Sep
15
comment Open a directory and let it update itself using “tail -f”
Thanks, but your addition will be better in my other question, regarding file monitoring. I am wanting directory monitoring here.
Sep
12
comment Open a directory and let it update itself using “tail -f”
All I want to see is if there is a new file shown. i.e. As I am running Apache, I have a service that might write to a log file - but I don't know when that will be, and I don't have the time to sit here and keep refreshing the folder. It's only two files anyways.
Sep
12
comment Open a directory and let it update itself using “tail -f”
Sorry I forgot to mention what System I am running on. I have updated my question. Will this still work with RHEL 5.10? I was also looking for a way similar to tail -f, so I kept along the lines of using tail. Thanks though.
Sep
12
comment Open a directory and let it update itself using “tail -f”
@celtschk: I saw that the webpage was using -lrt, but what does the rt stand for? The only ones I have used are: ls -l and ls -la.
Sep
9
comment Open a text file and let it update itself
Thanks, but tail -f error.log is perfect for what I need. The log file only gets updated every hour, so is sufficient for my use :-)
Sep
9
comment Open a text file and let it update itself
And this won't use up much resources?
Sep
9
comment Open a text file and let it update itself
Ah, so tail is the correct way to use it? Wow, I really didn't think I could use that. I was expecting a much longer expression.
Sep
4
comment Which is more widely used: chmod 777 or chmod a+rwx
@StéphaneChazelas, but its still the same, right? As per the answer on my other question: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/153720/…; I can see now, that adding the + means to add to the current permissions. e.g. chmod a+rx,u+w. So if I did: chmod a=rx,u+w that would mean 755?
Sep
4
comment How to group alphanumeric permissions
OK that is an easier way to write it. Thanks.
Sep
4
comment How to group alphanumeric permissions
@Archemar, no I haven't, as it was part of the question. But surely there is shorter way to write it?
Sep
4
comment Which is more widely used: chmod 777 or chmod a+rwx
@OlivierDulac, oh so if there is no one else on the system, except root and one user, then there is no need to set the last permission? I'm just curious about this now :)
Sep
4
comment Which is more widely used: chmod 777 or chmod a+rwx
What is the point in setting the others permission? If you are logged into the machine as the user, then surely you can just use the users permission?
Sep
4
comment Which is more widely used: chmod 777 or chmod a+rwx
@MartinErhardt I would normally just use 775 or 755 for executable files only.
Sep
3
comment Which is more widely used: chmod 777 or chmod a+rwx
Thanks for this. I guess that by writing it out in full (alphanumeric) will prevent people from asking what does the 7 mean, etc.
Sep
3
comment Which is more widely used: chmod 777 or chmod a+rwx
OK, what does the octal mean? To be honest, I use the numerical values too, but I know other people use the alphanumeric option.