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Mar
12
comment Xen domU sort of ignores /etc/network/interfaces
I can't I don't have access to the setup anymore. I needed a solution 2 months ago. What would you expect to see in and read from that tshark dump? Notice that this must be a Xen domU specific issue.
Mar
6
comment Xen domU sort of ignores /etc/network/interfaces
It says already up.
Mar
5
comment Xen domU sort of ignores /etc/network/interfaces
I am sorry, I do not understand your answer. When I log into the machine ip link show reports the interfaces as up.
Feb
25
comment how to give read, write and execute permission to other user to access mounted shared directory
Have you ever tried chmod 777 /home/nfs_local? Why didn't it work? What export/mount options did you use?
Feb
23
comment sed command and formatting one line help
@jasonwryan: The question is tagged with sed though :D
Feb
23
comment sed command and formatting one line help
Well, in this particular case I'd try s/^\(.\).*|\([^ ]*\).*$/\1\2/ but I don't know if that is what you are looking for.
Feb
12
comment Use bash's read builtin without a while loop
@Scott: ad edit of my question. are you sure removing the pipe symbol does not make the the last paragraph false ...?
Dec
26
comment How does ps get the executable of processes of other users?
How do you make ps show the running executable? The "usual" output I get is /proc/<pid>/cmdline, which is a world readable file ...
Nov
8
comment Convert all non-JPG images to JPGs
@user8547: yes, that should work. I don't think convert will modify in place, but you can add a line right after the convert line rm ${FILENAME}, which will delete the original file.
Nov
7
comment Convert all non-JPG images to JPGs
@don_crissti: but the man page shipped with Debian does. So this feature still needs to spread it seems ... or the man page is broken. Documentation is not valued as much as it used to be.
Nov
7
comment Convert all non-JPG images to JPGs
@user8547: no, you forgot the * before the . and a ; after FILENAME and another ; after jpg. The newlines matter. Maybe your shell's manual can help you with these details ...
Nov
7
comment Convert all non-JPG images to JPGs
@user8547: if you are specifically looking to convert just all bmp and png images, you can use the while loop provided above, but replace ls | grep -v jpg$ with echo *.{bmp,png}. Within that echo statement, you can even complement the ,-separated list of extentions to include other formats as well.
Nov
7
comment Convert all non-JPG images to JPGs
@user8547: no, it won't. You need to iterate over all filenames, you cant just supply them all to mogrify.
Oct
29
comment Is it possible to run vlc as root?
If you actually did install vlc that way ... have you just tried running vlc as root? Why doesn't it work? What does happen when you try? What did you expect to go differently?
Oct
26
comment Remote Xfce session in a separate console?
@Vasilly.Prokopyev: oh ... that's what you meant. Well, when setting up the ssh connection, you can add -L177:127.0.01:177 and -R6001:127.0.0.1:6001 to the ssh call, to make this work over SSH. However, in that scenario you could just install x2goserver on your desktop pc and x2goclient on your netbook. I do believe the client can be full screen.
Oct
18
comment Use bash's read builtin without a while loop
@kasperd: i use head as simple exemplarisch. Usually the heads are greps.
Oct
15
comment Why is ping much faster when using -f
I don't understand this answer. ryekayo's average rtt is higher when using the -f option. So 1. the OP's claim can't be reproduced, 2. the excerpts from the man page don't give the slightest hint at which measurement is more accurate and 3. what's a "fair" result anyways?
Oct
15
comment Use bash's read builtin without a while loop
My problem was that I thought bash would put everything between the pipe symbol and the end of the line into the same subshell, but apparently it only reads the next statement.
Oct
15
comment Use bash's read builtin without a while loop
I think I got it: The actual point is that WHEN USING PIPES, bash creates subshells for each processes of the pipeline, and due to scoping the variables are gone, after the pipeline. Using {} makes the remainder of the line an (one!) element of the pipeline, while inside that subshell the variables are available. Using process substitution one is not using pipes and therefore bash does not spawn subshells.
Oct
15
comment Use bash's read builtin without a while loop
{} ... I only tried (). Why does the ; in your second example not start "a new set of commands"? Actually I don't understand the < < construct at all. Need to think ...