248 reputation
27
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Jan 12 at 4:40

Jan
12
accepted Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
Jan
12
comment Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
'Special' thanks for mentioning GCFS - I never knew it existed.
Jan
12
comment Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
@Gilles I doubt if I was assuming the deletion of non-empty dirs. I could restate the deletion part like this if you like: First, delete the file a/b/c/d, then the dir a/b/c, and finally the dir a/b. So, my question is -- design-wise -- what should happen to a process that had earlier cded itself into a/H but now attempts a cd ..? Not sure if I followed your last sentence: Doesn't B always contain an entry for A?
Jan
12
revised Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
improved the line art (the +'s were giving the notion of expandable dirs)
Jan
12
comment Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
+1 for showing the other possibility of the dir completely empty -- without even the . and .. -- in some implementation of the feature. Being 'discouraged' to use a feature is one thing (like, it's discouraged to work as root on a *nix box for ordinary work), but the mechanics of the feature, the design behind it, is another. My question was more on the design of the feature and side-effects (if any) if it were supported by a system and if the user were a root user. Eg, how would a textbook describe this feature, notwithstanding the caveats that would come with it?
Jan
11
comment Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
And I'm in the process of getting those scars right now! If you're building your own filesystem, you can always establish a known policy/behavior (of, say, jumping to the default dir of your filesystem if there's such a thing even, or cd'ing to $HOME, etc). However, I'm quite curious to know how the 'standard' or 'well-known' filesystems that do support this feature really handle the reference counting of the target dir and the cd .. business.
Jan
11
revised Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
minor typo fixed
Jan
11
asked Linux: How does hard-linking to a directory work?
Sep
2
awarded  Notable Question
May
26
accepted Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
May
26
comment Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
Your answer is, essentially, the same as Hauke's. But because yours has more detail in it (which must have required more effort on your part), I'm flagging yours as final.
May
24
comment Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
I'm tempted to make your answer final. Will wait for a few more days to see any further responses or comments from others. Thanks, and +1, meanwhile.
May
23
awarded  Yearling
May
23
asked Fedora 18 guest in VirtualBox 4.2: How to assign static IPv4 address to guest regardless of active ethernet interface on host
May
20
comment Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
I may or may not go this route but I do appreciate your mentioning FUSE.
May
20
comment Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
Thanks. I'm upvoting your response and comment in any case.
May
20
comment Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
So, with the FUSE approach, I'd have to point P's use of F to the FUSE file system somehow... which could be either via (soft-)linking, or mounting, or...? Is that right? Have never dabbled with FUSE before. it would be an interesting thing to play with.
May
20
comment Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'
But how is this different from shell-based infinite loop I proposed in the original question above?
May
20
awarded  Critic
May
20
asked Dynamic file content generation: Satisfying a 'file open' by a 'process execution'