343 reputation
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bio website
location California
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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen yesterday

I've been a computer hobbyist since before the IBM PC, and a professional programmer not too long after that. I've had experience with electronic repair, manufacturing, and testing of professional audio.

I tutored other students in Fortran before PCs existed, built my first computer from bare circuit boards and reject parts (S-100 CP/M system), and transitioned from stereo repair, to professional audio manufacturing at Dolby Labs, where I set up the automated functional testing for Dolby professional equipment. From there, I went into programming full-time as a C programmer for Mac presentation graphics systems, then to Windows C++ video programming. My last 10 years was as a C++ Windows software engineer for a corporate source code control system.

I'm now a Linux user, doing part time website development using all open source tools like Vim, PHP, Javascript/jQuery, etc for local businesses. I'm semi-retired, so I only do jobs that I want to do.


Sep
7
comment What is the exact difference between a 'terminal', a 'shell', a 'tty' and a 'console'?
The command line is simply the language used to send commands to the command-line interpreter running in a shell from the terminal/terminal emulator.
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Sep
16
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
comment Not able to configure phpmyadmin in Ubuntu 12.04
This isn't an answer because I don't know anything about any lamp wrappers, but it looks like Apache may not be running, or you are not connecting correctly. Apache is responsible for intercepting php files and translating them to HTML, which is all the browser understands (besides JavaScript).
Jul
2
comment Gnome, KDE, XFCE… which is most simple and customizable?
I think they all are capable of most of what you want, but some may take more work than others to learn and implement the features. I personally use Gnome classic with Compiz and dual monitors, and I use the keyboard a lot. There are shortcuts for moving windows between monitors, to various places on one monitor (like top half, left half, middle full screen, etc. There's also keys Expo, etc. And I believe they all have clipboard managers.
Jul
2
comment Clock skews on remote machines
NTP is the standard for time sync. There were utilities that calculated the drift years ago; I remember source code for Unix at the time, but I don't remember right now what the names were. Search for time synchronization and correction.
Jul
2
answered Clock skews on remote machines
Jul
2
answered Gnome, KDE, XFCE… which is most simple and customizable?
May
27
comment ssh localhost without password doesn't work on Fedora 14
FWIW, I always use two commands: 1. ssh-keygen -t rsa (or dsa), then 2. ssh-copy-id "username@hostname -p" for rsa. I don't usually use dsa, but I think the second command is something like ssh-copy-id -i /homedirectory/.ssh/id_dsa username@hostname -p.
May
19
comment Partition not mounting from fstab
Both of these are good comments, and I wanted to second the 1st suggestion. Using mount -a is almost always a good habit to check the validity of fstab. The reason it is good is that it will immediately list any errors it finds, so you not only know whether the file is valid, but if it isn't, you know what the errors are, which, of course, is a nice first step to solving the problem.
May
3
comment SSH into Ubuntu VM remotely
I'm slightly confused about what's running where, so if I'm off base, forgive me; but... For troubleshooting, you could temporarily install an ssh demon on your main system (Ubuntu?), and see if you can connect to it from outside. That would let you know if it's getting through the router. Then you might be able to troubleshoot (if needed) from the main system to the VM to make sure that part is working.
May
3
comment Add blinking network-monitor icon to GNOME / XFCE
I'm don't know XFCE, but Gnome2 and Gnome3 in classic mode has a panel applet called "System Monitor" that can be set to show a graph of that information, where you can choose the colors for each; I have green for incoming, and red for outgoing on mine.
May
2
awarded  Student
May
2
awarded  Editor
May
2
revised mounting to non-empty directory, then later deleting original files
Added results after using the advice given.
May
2
comment mounting to non-empty directory, then later deleting original files
Well, your answer was good, but the assumption wasn't. :) I wasn't running out of space, but I wanted to avoid that possibility in the future. I had plenty of unused space on my drive, along with several used and unused partitions to play with, so I decided to do this more as something that seemed like a good idea. I used the tip from @jippie before I saw your post, but both seem to be similar. Yours was more detailed, but I didn't really need details too much, just the idea was enough. Thanks for the post
May
2
awarded  Scholar
May
2
accepted mounting to non-empty directory, then later deleting original files
May
2
comment mounting to non-empty directory, then later deleting original files
Well, that worked out perfectly - amazing that it was that easy. I used the command sudo mount --bind / /mnt/temp to mount the filesystem, and deleted the files with no problem, after confirming that the timestamps were different than /var, to make sure it was indeed different. Thanks for the tip.