484 reputation
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location California
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Dec 19 at 21:07

Studying CS at Cal State Stanislaus.

Find me on github at http://github.com/bryangarza :)


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Mar
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
7
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
7
awarded  Nice Answer
May
13
comment Terminal change keys
It would be something like keycode 38 = e E e E. View your current keymap with xmodmap -pke.
Mar
19
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
awarded  Revival
May
16
comment “unexpected end of file” in bash script
By the way, all those semicolons are unnecessary. The only reason to use them is if you want multiple commands in the same line.
May
16
answered Does a terminal multiplexer have any benefit when used with a tiling window manager?
May
4
comment How do I detect whether changes in nano were discarded or saved?
You shouldn't default to nano, it is better to use whatever $EDITOR is set to.
Apr
2
answered Light GUI user interfaces
Mar
27
comment Testing Scripts
If your script is called script.sh why do you have /etc/init.d/teiid.sh in your crontab?
Mar
21
awarded  Critic
Mar
21
comment Which shell should I learn for FreeBSD and Debian?
There's no "official" shell, but some are better than others.
Mar
20
revised pacman could not find database
fixed quote
Mar
20
awarded  Analytical
Mar
20
comment Compiling and running linux test project
So after following all of the instructions in INSTALL, you still get the LTP not installed correctly error?
Mar
20
revised Terminal change keys
edited block of code
Mar
20
comment Terminal change keys
If that is the case, one can always manually activate the custom keymap with xmodmap ~/.Xmodmap. In fact, I have this very command in my ~/.xinitrc file, so that it only runs when I start my window manager (in this case dwm). The downside to this is that the custom keymap is not enabled when using pure X. Still, having the ability to call xmodmap whenever is a great advantage which allows much flexibility. You can put the xmodmap command wherever, including ~/.bash_profile, which guarantees that there is a user logged in.
Mar
20
answered Terminal change keys