698 reputation
317
bio website localhost
location Nowhere, OK
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 21 at 8:53

nothing here yet


Jan
14
revised How to keep track of changes in /etc/
more precise
Jan
14
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
Kernel version
Jan
14
asked How to keep track of changes in /etc/
Jan
14
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@psusi Maybe you are interested in the benchmark I have made. I also took into account the linear access you have mentioned. Unforunatly I didn't have the time to benchmark btrfs and jfs too.
Jan
14
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
Result
Jan
14
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
Benchmark II
Jan
12
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@psusi OK, thanks for the clarification. Do you know of any small-file benchmarks comparing xfs, ext4 and reiserfs?
Jan
12
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@psusi as far as i know thats not true of transactions in btrfs.
Jan
12
revised How do I track all the most recent file changes on my UNIX system?
The Red Hat has the same name
Jan
12
suggested approved edit on How do I track all the most recent file changes on my UNIX system?
Jan
12
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
Benchmark
Jan
12
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@psusi ext4: yes, my fault, the garbage part is only true for data=writeback and doesn't affect directories at all. nevertheless iirc files might be uncomplete in data=ordered mode when power outage happens while data is written.
Jan
12
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@psusi btrfs: shure, when you use btrfs, you don't need lvm at all.
Jan
11
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
added 81 characters in body
Jan
11
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
edited body
Jan
11
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@Patrick UPS: There is a big difference on how much data you will loose. While XFS will show data that might be corrupted as \0, even whole directories, ext4 will have added garbage to a directory or file (unless in data=journal mode). Btrfs in contrast uses transactional writes, so that you will at least end up with the last non corrupted version of a file in case of a power outage. Also note that many people do not have UPS outside datacenters.
Jan
11
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@Patrick UPS: There is a big d
Jan
11
comment What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
@Patrick Kernel: look here even though XFS performance has been improved, it's still slow with small files (DBench uses a filesize of 5B). XFS was intentionally made for CGI with huge partitions and files that are > 4MB, not for small 1KB files.
Jan
10
revised What is the most high-performance Linux filesystem for storing a lot of small files (HDD, not SSD)?
XFS
Jan
10
awarded  Supporter