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Jan
29
comment What's the difference between udev and acpi(d)
Wow, I never thought of those two things as being in any way whatsoever remotely similar! ACPI is, like, a PC hardware monitoring and control thing, and udev is a Linux-specific system for managing device hotplugging and dynamically updating /dev.
Jan
29
comment Can I mask a program on the OS from the command line?
Install a rootkit?
Jan
29
answered How to safely delete a regular directory that contains several btrfs snapshots inside it?
Jan
29
comment When is a port considered being used?
@vonbrand, what do you mean by that? A socket is not really "identified" by that since not all sockets are necessarily bound.
Jan
28
comment When is a port considered being used?
Try the socket manpage for quick reference info. The venerable textbook for this information is TCP/IP illustrated. I'm probably dating myself by recommending that, there might be something good that's more recent, but then again you can't go wrong with Stevens.
Jan
28
comment MX Record Question
You can certain configure your MTA to override the DNS MX record for a specific domain and send instead to a hardcoded name or IP adress, but the way you configure that entirely depends on what MTA you are using.
Jan
28
answered When is a port considered being used?
Jan
27
comment Is this a better way to summarize the Synopsis of the find command?
It's the same as, say, putting -ls first, it's just that putting -delete first is a more... destructive... mistake. :-) I believe that if you understand that the arguments to find all form one big expression, you are more likely to understand how find really works and less likely to make that mistake. If you think that actions are separate from tests and don't form part of the expression, it can lead to that mistake.
Jan
27
answered Is this a better way to summarize the Synopsis of the find command?
Jan
26
answered sendmail default mail path
Jan
26
comment Is it possible to move content of screen?
Maybe with xrandr? But otherwise you are probably looking at some kind of nested X server solution (e.g. VNC)
Jan
20
comment On-the-fly decompression
@gerrit, I see now that fusecompress won't work for you because it expects the compressed backing store to be in its own special format which may use gzip compression but isn't an actual gzip file. It won't understand a backing store that is already pre-filled with gzip files (your panfs filesystem). Sorry about the reference to that, it was just the first hit I got when searching for something like this. I still feel like there's a decent chance someone else might have already written a different fuse filesystem that is suitable.
Jan
20
comment IP tables - how to configure connections into my compuer
You'll also need to allow ESTABLISHED connections.
Jan
20
comment On-the-fly decompression
You can try a fuse gzip filesystem but there is absolutely no getting around the hard fact that gzip files must be read sequentially from start to the location you need. You can transparently emulate seeking but it has to be done by internally uncompressing everything up to the seek point.
Jan
19
answered Where are characters typed into a terminal saved?
Jan
17
revised apt-get install local package even when outdated
added 4 characters in body
Jan
17
comment ls -lu does not give last access time
"Access times will not be updated, if they're already older or equal to" — should that be "newer or equal to"?
Jan
17
comment How do I load a kernel module later in the boot sequence?
It might help if you told us which block device you are feeding to g_mass_storage. Basically, what is the file= parameter you are giving to the module.
Jan
17
comment How do I load a kernel module later in the boot sequence?
I'm pretty sure your hypothesis is false. The read-only or read+write state of the root filesystem should not have anything to do with it because g_mass_storage works with a block device, not with a mounted filesystem (and that block device is presumably not the device that hosts the root filesystem as that would lead to double mounting and file system corruption).
Jan
17
comment I set time to wrong time zone, how do I change it? (Debian)
It sounds like you now have the timezone set correctly, but the actual system clock is off by 8 hours. Run ntpd to set the system clock automatically and you won't have to worry about this. Failing that, set the system clock to the correct time manually or with ntpdate or rdate.