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seen Apr 1 at 21:00

Jan
6
awarded  Yearling
Oct
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
23
comment Append huge files to each other without copying them
No, it works from the beginning because of fcntl(F_FREESP) which frees the space associated with a given byte range of the file (it makes it sparse).
Jun
23
comment Append huge files to each other without copying them
I know... but I couldn't think of any way that didn't involve writing code, and I figured writing what I wrote was better that writing nothing. I didn't think of your clever trick of starting from the end!
Jun
23
answered Append huge files to each other without copying them
Jun
4
answered Understanding getlogin()
Jun
4
comment Understanding getlogin()
I don't even know what an auid is, but logname and getlogin() get the username from utmp by cross-referencing to the current tty, don't they? For that reason they're not secure.
Jun
3
comment How can find support large files?
I find it strange that find would make any claims whatsoever about what kind of "indirect" or "not actually allocated" blocks are or are not counted. I think those claims might well be anachronistic or applicable only to some particular but unspecified type of filesystem. I can only imagine that find simply uses whatever the filesystem reports in the st_blocks field of the stat structure; what that value is and how it is calculated is totally up to each type of filesystem.
May
20
comment Querying an overlayfs
aufs: Under /sys/fs/aufs can be found one directory per instance of currently mounted aufs filesystem. Inside each directory, there are files br0, br1, and so on, which contain the names of each of the branches of that aufs instance.
May
17
comment Querying an overlayfs
Oh! I didn't realize there was a filesystem actualy called "overlayfs". I'm only familiar with aufs and unionfs. The latter two do provide an easy way to query what their underlying branches are, but I wouldn't know about overlayfs.
May
15
comment Querying an overlayfs
Which type of "overlay" filesystem are you using?
May
12
answered Finding all the hard-links of a file without traversing the file system
May
8
comment Which home directory should 'nobody' have?
I think that generally each operating system or operating system distribution has its own pesudo-standard for what the home directories of various system users are. For example, on Debian it's /nonexistent. What is the home directory of the nobody user on a fresh install of the operating system you are using?
May
5
comment Standard I/O File Descriptors
stdin, stdout, and stderr are file descriptors, not files. They may refer to files (or pipes, or sockets, etc...). In this case you made the stdout file descriptor (which is 1) refer to your file stdout.txt in the current directory. It doesn't matter what type of filesystem stdout.txt lives on.
May
5
comment Standard I/O File Descriptors
It doesn't matter what kind of filesystem is in use. If you use 1> stdout.txt (or, more commonly, just > stdout.txt), you should get a file called stdout.txt in the current directory. If the file can't be opened in the current directory (permission problem or some other error), you should get an error message informing you of this.
Apr
29
comment Why is resolv.conf spelled without the 'e'?
The easy answer is because it's a configuration file for libresolv, but of course that just leads to the question of why libresolv is called libresolv. To me it sounds like one of those legacy 6-character limits — the same reason why strcmp & co. are all named with 6 characters.
Apr
13
revised Having the 'id_rsa.pub' file in my dotfiles public repo securely
additional information about sharing; see comments
Apr
13
comment Having the 'id_rsa.pub' file in my dotfiles public repo securely
Correct, but I wouldn't tempt fate by doing that. See edits.
Apr
13
answered Having the 'id_rsa.pub' file in my dotfiles public repo securely
Mar
24
comment Creation of a WORM file
Permission bits of 4000 make no sense. Did you mean 0400? If so, that's a read-only file, not a WORM file. Also, what's the "retention"? I do not believe that any such thing as "retention time" actually exists. Most importantly, what are you actually trying to do?