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bio website localhost
location San Francisco, CA
age 39
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

Research Computing Architect at the University of California, Berkeley


2d
awarded  Necromancer
2d
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
comment What are the practical implications, if any, of using software which processes are not the descendants of the window manager?
@strugee Looks like the comment system ate your backticks on `foo` notation! In scripts I use $(foo) notation as you suggested, however on the command-line I'm used to using backticks and (if your shell supports it, which it is likely to) the two notations are equivalent except in the case of multiply-nested backticks which require escaping the inner backticks-- definitely a place where $(foo) notation is better, but in practice that rarely happens, and when it does it is often easier to read when you mix the two notations. For example: echo `ls -lad "$(find /tmp -maxdepth 1)"`
Jan
13
answered What are the practical implications, if any, of using software which processes are not the descendants of the window manager?
Dec
31
comment How can I solve this ssh-agent problem?
If you're seeing the odd behavior with the Ctrl+Alt+t that you set in the Keyboard Shortcuts then I think you're probably experiencing a bug in mdm/MATE. What version of Mint are you running?
Dec
29
comment How can I solve this ssh-agent problem?
well, presuming you use gnome (and I think Mint does by default, so unless you've changed it from the default?) then I think not having your mate-terminal inheriting from gnome-session is the problem. two questions: 1) what is the output of pgrep -fl gnome-session and; 2) what action do you take to actually invoke your terminal? from a menu? from a hot-key binding? or ????
Dec
28
revised Wireless networking with CentOS
added 1348 characters in body
Dec
28
comment Wireless networking with CentOS
Suggesting that people manually edit /etc/network/interfaces by hand for their wifi is not very helpful since it is fraught with peril, not to mention being cumbersome since you have to manually change it every time you move to a new SSID or if you want it to be dynamic you have to set up your supplicant by yourself which is not the simplest thing to get right. Just use NetworkManager and click "Available to all users" and the problem is solved.
Dec
28
answered Wireless networking with CentOS
Dec
28
revised How can I solve this ssh-agent problem?
deleted 4 characters in body
Dec
28
comment How can I solve this ssh-agent problem?
Most desktop Linux systems (Mint included) handle ssh-agent properly upon login right out of the box and it is usually roll-your-own things like this that break it. If for some reason your system doesn't handle ssh-agent, don't do it by hand. Instead use keychain which is well-designed to handle this and related problems. It also works for BSD (Mac) and other non-Linux systems.
Dec
28
answered How can I solve this ssh-agent problem?
Dec
27
answered Kernel socket structure and TCP_DIAG
Dec
26
awarded  Excavator
Dec
26
revised How to diagnose a reliably unreliable connection?
add clarity by removing redundant word in sentence
Dec
26
suggested suggested edit on How to diagnose a reliably unreliable connection?
Sep
26
awarded  Yearling
Mar
6
comment List only bind mounts
@Gilles I deleted my errant comment to remove confusion. You're right, it is indeed POSIX-compliant. Also now I understand the reason we are seeing different behavior of mount and /etc/mtab. You are using Debian stable which has the older version of util-linux-ng; I am using Debian testing which has a newer version that no longer seems to have the same /etc/mtab behavior, which is maybe why @rozcietrzewiacz did not see bind in in /etc/mtab if his distribution is also using a newer version?
Mar
6
comment List only bind mounts
@Gilles What mount --version are you using that records any bind information in /etc/mtab? I am using version 2.20.1 and I looked at the latest sources and in neither case do I see bind information recorded anywhere that would allow you to grep for bind. On the other hand, what I suggested in my answer does in fact list bind mounts created with --bind as well as using the bind option.
Mar
6
comment List only bind mounts
@Gilles Actually, you can do this simply using findmnt | fgrep [ as explained here.