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Jan
22
comment Is it safe to strip the binaries in Linux Mint?
Compare the cost of your time to the cost of a bigger hard drive.
Jan
5
comment Is it possible to overwrite a directory with a file in linux
Was the directory called folder1 or Folder1? Is it possible that that's the source of the confusion?
Jan
4
comment How do I change the screen font size when using a virtual console?
I tried this (on Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS). It just sends a + character.
Dec
27
comment How to conditionally do something if a command succeeded or failed
@vonbrand: Sure, but I don't think it's common to check the return value of vi.
Dec
27
comment Why is it better to use “#!/usr/bin/env NAME” instead of “#!/path/to/NAME” as my shebang?
@Kevin: Just one small point: I've never seen /usr/bin/python be a Python 3 executable; that's generally /usr/bin/python3. (Unless some newer distributions have changed that -- which would break a lot of scripts.)
Dec
27
comment Why is it better to use “#!/usr/bin/env NAME” instead of “#!/path/to/NAME” as my shebang?
@Kevin: Hmm. I'm not much of a Python programmer myself, but I find your statement surprising. I would have thought that most users of Python scripts (not necessarily Python programmers) don't even use Virtualenv. On the other hand, I suppose the #!/usr/bin/env hack would still work for such users -- but it wouldn't have much advantage over #!/usr/bin/python.
Dec
2
comment How to test whether a file uses CRLF or LF without modifying it?
@Scott: Thanks, updated.
Aug
9
comment Is `~/Documents` a relative or an absolute path?
@MichaelKjörling: A few programs implement ~ expansion; most do not. For example, if you type ls -l ~, the ls program never sees the ~ character; it's expanded by the shell before ls is invoked. If you actually pass a ~ to ls, it won't treat it specially; try ls -l '~'` (which will try to list a file named literally ~).
Jul
30
comment Who is this UID and GID?
Which means that if a user on your system happens to have the same numeric UID as the owner of the file on the remote system, that user will end up owning the file. In some contexts that could be a serious problem. If you use the -o or --no-same-owner option (needed only for root), you won't have this problem.
Jul
27
comment The arithmetic operations in bash date… ¿are reversed?
It's not "bash date". The date command is unrelated to bash, except that you happen to be invoking it from a bash shell. You're probably using the GNU Coreutils date command.
Jun
25
comment Can someone explain this tail + line to me?
@jabbajac: Newer versions of the POSIX spec don't support the +42 and -42 arguments for tail; instead, you have to type -n +42 or -n -42. You can enable the older syntax with export _POSIX2_VERSION=199209. pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/tail.html
Jun
4
comment Fastest & Most Core way to replace “\r\n” with “\n” in a file?
What exactly does "Most Core" mean?
May
8
comment Pass environment variables' values to a program?
@Anko: In your suggested command, $A is expanded by the shell before sudo is invoked; it won't necessarily reflect the sudo and echo commands' actual environment. You can try A=/tmp sudo printenv | grep '^A='
Apr
29
comment Unix: a question about xargs
What exactly does "I have GNU ls in my path" mean? Is the directory containing the GNU ls executable in your $PATH environment variable, and does it precede the directory (probably /bin) containing the non-GNU ls command? Please update your question to show us the actual value of your $PATH. xargs will execute the first ls command that it finds in a directory in your $PATH; it doesn't know about aliases.
Apr
23
comment Laptop unusable after deleting /bin
The owner is far more likely to be able to recover the system than the OP is. Assuming this is genuine, my advice would be to (a) leave the laptop powered on, (b) do not touch anything, and (c) tell the owner exactly what happened.
Apr
23
comment Laptop unusable after deleting /bin
I'm sure it's too late now (assuming this is genuine), but /bin and /usr/bin are two separate directories in Ubuntu. It's at least possible that there are programs under /usr/bin that could be used to restore the contents of /bin.
Apr
21
comment My cron job doesn't run
This makes the same mistake as the original question: the 1 in the first field means it runs once an hour, at NN:01, not once every minute.
Apr
21
comment My cron job doesn't run
@roaima: It's different in that it actually runs every minute, rather than one minute after each hour as the cron job in the question would. * * * * * would also work; the /1 is not needed. But notify-send still won't work in that environment.
Apr
21
comment My cron job doesn't run
Your current cron job doesn't run every minute; it runs at one minute after the hour (00:01, 01:01, 02:01, etc.). But the real problem is that notify-send won't work from the restricted environment in which cron jobs run.
Apr
5
comment Why is emacs not preinstalled?
It should be easy enough to install it yourself.