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Jun
25
comment Can someone explain this tail + line to me?
@jabbajac: Newer versions of the POSIX spec don't support the +42 and -42 arguments for tail; instead, you have to type -n +42 or -n -42. You can enable the older syntax with export _POSIX2_VERSION=199209. pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/tail.html
Jun
4
comment Fastest & Most Core way to replace “\r\n” with “\n” in a file?
What exactly does "Most Core" mean?
May
8
comment Pass environment variables' values to a program?
@Anko: In your suggested command, $A is expanded by the shell before sudo is invoked; it won't necessarily reflect the sudo and echo commands' actual environment. You can try A=/tmp sudo printenv | grep '^A='
Apr
29
comment Unix: a question about xargs
What exactly does "I have GNU ls in my path" mean? Is the directory containing the GNU ls executable in your $PATH environment variable, and does it precede the directory (probably /bin) containing the non-GNU ls command? Please update your question to show us the actual value of your $PATH. xargs will execute the first ls command that it finds in a directory in your $PATH; it doesn't know about aliases.
Apr
23
comment Laptop unusable after deleting /bin
The owner is far more likely to be able to recover the system than the OP is. Assuming this is genuine, my advice would be to (a) leave the laptop powered on, (b) do not touch anything, and (c) tell the owner exactly what happened.
Apr
23
comment Laptop unusable after deleting /bin
I'm sure it's too late now (assuming this is genuine), but /bin and /usr/bin are two separate directories in Ubuntu. It's at least possible that there are programs under /usr/bin that could be used to restore the contents of /bin.
Apr
21
comment My cron job doesn't run
This makes the same mistake as the original question: the 1 in the first field means it runs once an hour, at NN:01, not once every minute.
Apr
21
comment My cron job doesn't run
@roaima: It's different in that it actually runs every minute, rather than one minute after each hour as the cron job in the question would. * * * * * would also work; the /1 is not needed. But notify-send still won't work in that environment.
Apr
21
comment My cron job doesn't run
Your current cron job doesn't run every minute; it runs at one minute after the hour (00:01, 01:01, 02:01, etc.). But the real problem is that notify-send won't work from the restricted environment in which cron jobs run.
Apr
5
comment Why is emacs not preinstalled?
It should be easy enough to install it yourself.
Mar
5
comment Do I have multiple python on my computer? and how to uninstall one of them?
Why remove python3.3? It's a newer version of the language -- and it typically doesn't provide an executable named "python" (it's named "python3"). It shouldn't conflict with your Python 2 installation, and removing it means you can't run any scripts that depend on Python 3. (You can almost think of Python 2 and Python 3 as two different languages.)
Mar
4
comment How to output only file names (with spaces) in ls -Al?
If you have a directory name "personal domain", how is the substring "personal" useful? And if you want to filter out the additional information other than the name, why are you using the -l option?
Oct
24
comment Will a shell script execute in Solaris? if not, which is the fastest way to make it compatible
@jlliagre: /bin/sh does exist on Solaris. Why would using it be a problem? Is it an older version of the shell?
Oct
24
comment Will a shell script execute in Solaris? if not, which is the fastest way to make it compatible
Every UNIX-like system has a shell at /bin/sh. If you avoid features specific either to bash or to ksh, there shouldn't be a problem.
Sep
17
comment Can I make text in xterm looks and feels like gnome-terminal?
@peterph: I think you missed something. See my answer.
Sep
14
comment Why does “tail -f … | tail” fail to produce any output?
What are the last 10 digits of π?
Sep
14
comment Why is number of open files limited in Linux?
@Lothar: Interesting. I wonder why the limits would differ. Given the fileno and fdopen functions I'd expect them to be nearly interchangeable.
Sep
12
comment What is the command for listing all users who are members of the admin group?
visudo edits the sudoers file; use it only if you want to modify it (yes, that's what the OP indirectly asked about). If you just want to view it, cat /etc/sudoers or less /etc/sudoers is sufficient. (You'll need root privileges for any of these, so sudo cat /etc/sudoers, for example.)
Aug
10
comment id command doesn't show all user's groups
The /etc/group file is the default way group information is stored. Systems can supplement it with other sources such as YP/NIS and LDAP. The id and getent commands will query whatever source(s) the system uses. (Likewise for /etc/passwd and several other databases).
Jun
23
comment What does the period indicate when an environmental variable is set like “VARIABLE_NAME=.”
@godlygeek: The root directory does have a .. entry. Another way to look at it is that every directory has a .. entry pointing to its parent -- and the root directory / is its own parent.