4,504 reputation
11222
bio website keith-s-thompson.github.com
location San Diego, CA
age 54
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 2 days ago

I'm a programmer and all-around nerd living in San Diego, California and working at JetHead Development Inc.

E-mail: Keith.S.Thompson@gmail.com


Mar
12
comment can not chown a file from my $user to another $user
The ability for a non-root user to "give away" files can actually be configured per filesystem, at least on some OSs. But giving non-root users that ability can open security holes, so it's usually disabled.
Mar
4
answered Bash autocompletion for an environment variable holding a directory name
Mar
4
comment When a member of multiple groups, how do I set the default group for newly created files?
It's important to note that newgrp launches a new shell. I don't think there's any way to change the default group for an existing process.
Feb
25
comment What is the `[` program that resides in my system's /bin?
Minor quibble: test and [ are almost the same. [ requires a closing ]; test does not allow it (or rather doesn't treat an argument of ] specially).
Feb
25
comment What is the `[` program that resides in my system's /bin?
@StephaneChazelas: All shells? (csh and tcsh don't, but perhaps that's beside the point.) I don't think I've seen an sh-derived shell that doesn't have [ as a builtin, but don't think [ was a builtin in the original Bourne shell. In any case, removing /bin/[ would certainly be a bad idea.
Feb
19
comment Why does curl command take urls with parameters as input
The "bare" case is irrelevant; the shell is interpreting the & character and not passing it on to curl. The others are problematic, but can be reduced to the case with single quotes. I suggest removing all but the single-quote case from your question to avoid confusion.
Feb
13
comment What is the `[` program that resides in my system's /bin?
Scripts written for shells that don't have [ as a built-in command will break. Most shells do. Still, I certainly wouldn't recommend removing /bin/[.
Feb
12
comment Adding useraccount as root using “usermod -G root useraccount”?
"But this does not seem to work" is probably the least useful possible description of any problem. How does it not work?
Feb
12
comment What do these commands mean?
Things like $# are unfortunately difficult to find in the bash documentation. See this question.
Feb
12
comment what is $# used in a script for?
Things like $# are unfortunately difficult to find in the bash documentation. See this question.
Feb
11
comment What makes the files in my home directory appear, when I log in through SSH then run ecryptfs-mount-private?
Display of hidden files (files whose names start with .) is controlled by the -a or -A option of ls (-A is like -a except that it omits . and ..). Whether ll shows hidden files depends on how ll is defined. The permissions of a symbolic link are unimportant; it's the permissions on the target file that matter.
Feb
8
comment Map Caps Lock to Control in Linux Mint
Can you update your question to indicate exactly what the latest version is? This question could be here for years.
Feb
5
comment cd ${DIR_PATH} returns 'No such file or directory'
So what happens when you copy-and-paste the command in my previous comment? (My point is that I can't think of any reason why the ~ shouldn't have worked.)
Feb
4
comment cd ${DIR_PATH} returns 'No such file or directory'
I didn't downvote, but can you answer the question in my previous comment?
Feb
4
comment cd ${DIR_PATH} returns 'No such file or directory'
Is the path literally ~/concrete/path, or could there be spaces or other special characters in the directory path?
Feb
4
comment cd ${DIR_PATH} returns 'No such file or directory'
Copy-the following as a single line and paste it to your shell prompt: export DIR_PATH=~/concrete/path ; echo DIR_PATH=${DIR_PATH} ; cd ${DIR_PATH} ; pwd
Feb
4
comment cd ${DIR_PATH} returns 'No such file or directory'
That's odd; it works for me on Linux with bash 3.2.25 and 4.2.37. What does echo $BASH_VERSION print?
Feb
4
comment cd ${DIR_PATH} returns 'No such file or directory'
I'm surprised that worked. As far as I know, bash will replace ~ by your home directory path, whether it's in .bash_profile or not. I can imagine the expansion not working immediately after an =, but experiment with bash 3.2.25 and 4.2.37 indicates that that does work. What happens when you use $HOME rather than ~? If that works, it would be a better solution.
Feb
3
comment Installing as 'root' is not currently supported - what should I do?
@Perlnika: Ok, but you might still be able to create the smrtanalysis user account on your system. The configuration of /home prevents you from doing it straightforwardly, but you should be able to give the account a home directory somewhere else (that won't be shared with other nodes).
Feb
3
comment Installing as 'root' is not currently supported - what should I do?
@Perlnika: Then you're not following the installer's advice, which is to install the software as a dedicated user such as smrtanalysis, not as yourself. I'm not saying you have to do that, but if you're going to ignore that advice, be sure you have a good reason for doing so.