4,234 reputation
11222
bio website keith-s-thompson.github.com
location San Diego, CA
age 54
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 10 hours ago

I'm a programmer and all-around nerd living in San Diego, California and working at JetHead Development Inc.

E-mail: Keith.S.Thompson@gmail.com


Apr
15
comment Does `sl` ever show the current directory?
You could always create the intermediate directories -- but then it wouldn't be showing (just) the contents of the current directory.
Apr
14
comment wget - corrupted directories
The command name is wget, and Unix command names are case-sensitive. I've seen documentation refer to it as Wget, but I've never seen it referred to as wGet.
Apr
14
comment wget - corrupted directories
Is there some significance to the spelling wGet rather than wget?
Apr
7
comment Does cron know that the instance to be scheduled is already running?
@Ouki: You should post that as an answer.
Mar
25
answered Symbol that will show up first in output of `ls`?
Mar
18
comment How to recover from recursive 'chmod -x' on my home folder
At least you didn't chmod -x the directories!
Mar
18
comment How to test what shell I am using in a terminal?
If you're running tcsh, $tcsh and $version will be set. These are shell variables, not environment variables. If you're running a non-tcsh version of csh, I don't think there are any distinctive variables. And of course the syntax used to check variables differs between csh/tcsh on the one hand, and sh/ksh/bash/zsh on the other.
Mar
18
comment How to test what shell I am using in a terminal?
ps | grep $$ can still give false positives if, for example, your current process is 1234 and there's a process 12345.
Mar
12
comment can not chown a file from my $user to another $user
POSIX: "[EPERM] The effective user ID does not match the owner of the file, or the calling process does not have appropriate privileges and POSIX_CHOWN_RESTRICTED indicates that such privilege is required."
Mar
12
comment can not chown a file from my $user to another $user
I've seen it on a UNIX system some years ago; I don't remember the exact details off the top of my head, but I think it was an Alpha OSF1 system. See man pathconf; calling it with _PC_CHOWN_RESTRICTED tells you whether chown is restricted to root for the given path. (I don't think Linux lets you remove that restriction.)
Mar
12
comment Is this redirecting to /dev/null?
@Tonny: How is it overkill?
Mar
12
comment can not chown a file from my $user to another $user
The ability for a non-root user to "give away" files can actually be configured per filesystem, at least on some OSs. But giving non-root users that ability can open security holes, so it's usually disabled.
Mar
4
answered Bash autocompletion for an environment variable holding a directory name
Mar
4
comment When a member of multiple groups, how do I set the default group for newly created files?
It's important to note that newgrp launches a new shell. I don't think there's any way to change the default group for an existing process.
Feb
25
comment What is the `[` program that resides in my system's /bin?
Minor quibble: test and [ are almost the same. [ requires a closing ]; test does not allow it (or rather doesn't treat an argument of ] specially).
Feb
25
comment What is the `[` program that resides in my system's /bin?
@StephaneChazelas: All shells? (csh and tcsh don't, but perhaps that's beside the point.) I don't think I've seen an sh-derived shell that doesn't have [ as a builtin, but don't think [ was a builtin in the original Bourne shell. In any case, removing /bin/[ would certainly be a bad idea.
Feb
19
comment Why does curl command take urls with parameters as input
The "bare" case is irrelevant; the shell is interpreting the & character and not passing it on to curl. The others are problematic, but can be reduced to the case with single quotes. I suggest removing all but the single-quote case from your question to avoid confusion.
Feb
13
comment What is the `[` program that resides in my system's /bin?
Scripts written for shells that don't have [ as a built-in command will break. Most shells do. Still, I certainly wouldn't recommend removing /bin/[.
Feb
12
comment Adding useraccount as root using “usermod -G root useraccount”?
"But this does not seem to work" is probably the least useful possible description of any problem. How does it not work?
Feb
12
comment What do these commands mean?
Things like $# are unfortunately difficult to find in the bash documentation. See this question.