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0

Yes, you're correct: locking yourself to a particular CentOS point release will keep your system exposed to future security flaws by preventing you from receiving the fixes. Just as in RHEL, a CentOS point release is not a "version" in the same sense as used by much of the rest of the software world. You will never see a CentOS 6.4.1, for example. All the ...


0

I discovered iscsi error messages in /var/log/messages. And then I stopped iscsi and iscid daemons. After that yum completed the update process.


0

Need to look at the contents of /etc/yum.repos.d/ and also the output of the following command to be able to debug: $ rpm -q --verify -f /etc/yum.repos.d/* I had once got into a similar problem and the quick solution was to disable the offending repo by changing the enabled variable to 0 in the correct yum config file. But your error is not related to any ...


0

This is a problem that many people look to have faced, including myself. The solution itself is not as freely available as the question. It took me a bit of effort to find out one working way to download a RPM and all its dependencies even if any of them are already installed. So, let me write it down here. For everyone's information, yumdownloader does not ...


0

It looks like you've got a missing comment from the top of the file. Put a # in front of the very first line that says CentOS-Base.repo, yum should then work fine. Have you/anyone modified this file?


1

You have a conflicting version of httpd-tools, apparently from a source other than the official CentOS repositories. Remove it first: # rpm -e httpd-tools If it gives you any static about it, add --force and/or --nodeps until it obeys. When you then install httpd, it should also install a fresh copy of httpd-tools.


0

Not really a transaction error from what I can see, it's a file conflict. IMO (maybe someone can correct me) you pretty much have to remove the npm package. Either physically or just from the RPM database. If you're comfortable with it, you can just do a rpm -e npm to uninstall the package and remove the conflicting files from the filesystem. This would ...


0

As of this writing, there is no minetest 0.4.10 update for Fedora 20. I see that it's included in the new Fedora 21 release. You could also use my COPR, which tracks minetest development (roughly whenever I get around to updating it). See http://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/mattdm/minetest — there are builds for F19 and F20 as well as F21.


1

Add this line to /etc/yum.conf (got the idea from the post by DaPillow) proxy=socks5://ip:port It worked for me using yum 3.4.3 on Fedora 21, hope this helps.


0

I don't know of any repositories that will provide you with BASH 4.3 for Amazon Linux. If you have a specific requirement for this version of BASH then you're probably going to have to compile it from source, if you've no experience in doing that then this could be quite technical, there are some instructions on this over at the BASH FAQ; ...


1

Who ever is managing this box hsa done a pretty big no no. You're mixing YUM repositories that are offering the same packages. Notice these lines, for example: Error: Package: perl-core-5.10.1-136.el6.x86_64 (@anaconda-RedHatEnterpriseLinux -201311111358.x86_64/6.5) ...


6

Based on the output, you're mixing i686 and i386 packages together. You need to take care that you have the appropriate archiecture (i386, i686, x86_64, etc.) for your system's hardware and the other packages you have installed. So in your case yum is correctly complaining that you don't have the i386 versions of the dependencies installed already. Error: ...


0

Hopefully your support case is already resolved, but just in case, try: yum clean all yum repolist -v yum check-update This should at least give you a little more information to work with.


3

That is a list of the repositories that yum is currently using. You can get a description of each using: $ yum repolist You can remove this by lowering the debug level of yum: $ yum -d 1 install <a package> To make it permanent, find debuglevel in /etc/yum.conf and set it to 1 (I believe the default is 2). If you do this, you may miss important ...


0

To see what package provides a particular file or directory you can use yum provides <file>: $ yum provides /usr/share/applications/* Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, langpacks Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile * fedora: mirrors.ircam.fr * rpmfusion-free-rawhide: mirrors.coreix.net * rpmfusion-nonfree-rawhide: mirrors.coreix.net * updates: ...


2

There isn't a way to do this using yum but you can craft a rpm command that will do mostly what you want. You'll have to utilize the --queryformat option and iterate through the array of filenames using the little known option [..] in the --queryformat. NOTE: All these features are discussed in the manual for RPM, Maximum RPM: Taking the Red Hat Package ...


1

I'd like to know which packages have files within /usr/share/applications You can query for what package owns a particular file by doing a rpm -qf <absoluteFilePath>. To do an entire directory tree you can use the find command and filter the output. For example: [root@xxx01 ~]# find /usr/share/applications -type f -exec rpm -qf {} \; | grep -v ...


-1

I had a similar issue and used the following steps: $ sudo yum update --skip-broke $ sudo yum remove epel-release.noarch $ sudo yum update NOTE: you may need to remove other conflicting repositories.



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