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3

You can try: yum swap generic-release fedora-release or you can try with: yum shell > remove generic-release > install fedora-release > run if it does not work may be you can download correct rpm packages fedora-release fedora-release-notes and run: rpm -e --no-deps generic-release generic-release-notes rpm -ihv fedora-release-*


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Try this: $ yum install --downloadonly --downloaddir=/pkgs/ `cat pkg_list` You can specify multiple package names on the yum command line. The only caveat here is that your command line may become too long for the shell. Thanks


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By default yum stores its cache in /var/cache/yum


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Temporary Solution: Use -C flag: sudo yum install foobar -C Permanent solution: Use the metadata_expire flag in your yum.conf to control this. Edit /etc/yum.conf and set metadata_expire=15d You can use d, h or m to configure the time in days, hours, or minutes. Bonus: here is the documentation: metadata_expire is Time (in seconds) after which ...


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Differences in the command line behavior is documented extensively in the DNF docs, at Changes in DNF CLI compared to Yum. That also includes a mapping and brief explanation of differences in common plugins and utilities. As for "why", I recommend this article from DNF developers. In quick summary: the Yum API was organically grown, rather than designed ...


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I'm on fedora 20 with the same /etc/yum.repos.d/fedora.repo as you and yum can find fedora 12 version files. Eg: $ sudo yum --releasever=12 --installroot=/tmp/ list available '*gcc*' (1/2): updates/12/x86_64/primary_db | 6.3 MB 00:54 (2/2): fedora/12/x86_64/primary_db | 12 MB 01:49 Determining fastest ...


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I think it is your rpm install which is somehow off. I would expect on CentOS 5.11 with yum 3.2.22 installed that your rpm version would be 4.4.2.3, not 4.3.3 Specifically the rpm-libs package installs /usr/lib64/librpmdb-4.4.so which yum 3.2.22 requires but I am guessing you have /usr/lib64/librpmdb-4.3.so I suggest you download the new rpm-*4.4.*rpm ...


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There aren't any URLs that still work for Fedora 12. You could try manually downloading a few packages if it's small, or you could try to mirror the old archive locally and use that as a yum repo, but Fedora 12 is well past its end of life, so there aren't live repos for it anymore. To find individual packages, or the tree for where to download the repo ...


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I understand this is not strictly answering the question about downloading yum packages, but reading your primary objective, and if you are on a systemd system with LVM, I would think about lvm snapshots, as described here and in many other sites. Once mastered, you could easily revert back to a clean system every time you want in minutes, allows snapshot's ...


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I imagine you had a yum update bringing the "Command line" column. From man 5 yum.conf: Older versions of yum acted like "users", which always outputs the user who initiated the yum transaction. According with man 5 yum.conf, exists an option modifying yum output behavior. If you add history_list_view=cmds to /etc/yum.conf it shows "Command line", if ...


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Compared to Yum, DNF offers: Better dependency management Support Extensions other than Python Documented API Lower memory usage Less automatic synchronization of metadata with repositories, a process that users often complain "happens too often and takes too much time." See Will DNF Replace Yum?


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Yes, you could do that via using the downloadonly yum plugins. This is described in more detail in the RedHat article: How to use yum to download a package without installing it You would e.g. run yum install packagex --downloadonly --downloaddir=/tmp/packagex_repo which would download packagex and all dependencies required for the current system to only be ...


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One possibility: in /etc/yum.conf, you can change multilib_policy from "all" to "best" if by default you want to match x86_64. You can also specify the architecture after pkg_name. For example yumdownloader guile.x86_64. But here's what's going on which indicates how to "fix". When you don't use --archlist or give the architecture, a package like "guile", ...


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RPM is already made to do this. All the packages you can get by yum, you can get an RPM. RPM also is installed already everywhere you find yum. So just round up your RPMs, put them in a tar ball, and yeah you can just extract it and run a few RPM commands to get the job done. Of course a big thing of package management is dependencies, it will be up to you ...


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The yum installer allocates memory and mirror plugins create threads. I managed to update a VPS(128k) running Centos 6.0 to 6.6 as follows: edit /etc/yum/pluginconf.d/fastestmirror.conf and set maxthreads to 1 stop as many processes as possible. For example: service stop httpd remove any unwanted packages. For example: yum remove man-pages Run the ...


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yum install pyliblzma That installs the package you're missing.


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I believe you're out of luck if you want to use yum. That's not a feature the yum package supports. yum uses a subset of all the features provided by the rpm command. (It actually uses a python module rpmUtils rather than calling rpm directly.)


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When I looked up emacs via rpmfind I do see a dependency on the librsvg2 rpm. Try running rpmquery --requires and see if you don't see it as well. In either case it is pretty simple to run yum -y install librsvg2 to add that package.


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Sadly (or fortunately, depends how you see it) there's no such thing as selective file removal. What I'd propose is to list the files, the config files marked as such, and the documentation for each package in question and go through the list what you want to keep. Use rpm -ql packagename for listing the files rpm -qc packagename for listing the config ...


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As @Arthur stated, the problem is the disconnect between what's on the system and what's in the RPMDB. While the RPMDB does indeed have a JDK that it knows is installed, that JDK may not satisfy the package dependencies of the package you're attempting to install - in fact it definitely does not or you wouldn't be getting the particular error message. Where ...


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It's true that you have a JDK, but it is not in the RPM database, which is used by yum and other similar automatic package managers to know what packages are installed and get there respective versions. The best solution may be running sudo yum install jdk so you can get a version with yum and rpm. You can also consider following its suggestion to add the ...


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It sounds like the package(s) were configured so that the httpd.conf file(s) were not declared to be "config" files. See http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/s1-rpm-erase-and-config-files.html



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