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7

Living in the town (Nuremberg, Germany) where SuSE has its current roots I have a little background-info from some people, who originally worked for SuSE. The current graphical yast2 (running on X11) has its predecessors of the time when it was usual to just have non-graphical interfaces. That predecessor was yast - which is still there, but does not have ...


5

It seems that Yast is trying to use IPv6, which probably you don't have. According to documentation for openSUSE 12.2 you can turn IPv6 off in Network Settings or manually: To enable or disable IPv6 manually, edit /etc/modprobe.d/50-ipv6.conf and restart the system. It's working in browser probably because when IPv6 fails it falls back to IPv4. In ...


2

Thanks to Nikhil's input, I got this solved. YaST only uses service names, not port numbers, when setting up xinetd. Unfortunately, for some historic reasons, approx defaults to port 9999. This is registered to another service, named "distinct". So, the ad-hoc solution was to rename port 9999's service to "approx" in /etc/services and enter a new service ...


2

Have you tried mentionng the port number in the configuration? What do logs say? service approx { flags = REUSE socket_type = stream protocol = tcp wait = no user = root server = /usr/sbin/approx log_on_failure += USERID disable = no port ...


2

The short answer is yes. Command-line tools tend to scare away new users and they take longer to learn. I'm sure you've heard the arguments before. The SuSE devs want to make sure that the system is easy enough for people to figure it out as they go, and they build up from that minumum. Debian was leaning in that direction, too, but they didn't go as far ...


2

rpm -qa --qf '%-30{DISTRIBUTION} %{NAME}\n'| sort gives you a list of all repos used by your packages. Finding the ones you don't want is left as an exercise to the reader. :-).


2

Programs are installed as either 64-bit or 32-bit versions, removing 32-bit versions will remove those programs from your system completely. So when it comes to freeing up diskspace there is no point in differentiating between 64 or 32-bit, you should simply uninstall programs you don't want to use anymore or remove some other data.


2

It seems you can't do as much with command line than with the ncurses interface, as yast modules have to individually implement support for CLI. According to openSUSE 11.1 Reference Guide: To use YaST functionality in scripts, YaST provides command line support for individual modules. Not all modules have a command line support. To display the ...


2

Log in as "normal" user (using X11-forward), then su - -c yast2.


2

I found this tutorial: How to cache openSUSE repositories with Squid. excerpt How to make your local Squid web cache work with openSUSE repositories and the openSUSE network installation process. In effect, how to run a fully autonomous, local on-demand repository mirror. Even with a high-speed ADSL internet connection, savings of up to 60% are easily ...


2

Why not to depend on YaST There is nothing that does what YaST does for non-fedora distros. There are little tools here and there but nothing as comprehensive. It's a blessing and a curse. People that come to depend on YaST miss out on how things under the hood actually work. I would take the time to actually "learn" how things work rather than looking ...


1

There are two things here: If zypper in ncurses-devel fails, something is wrong with your system - do you have any repositories enabled at all? What SUSE based distribution are you using? To compile the kernel you don't need ncurses at all (it would be a pretty silly requirement for such a low-lewel piece of software). You need ncurses (and its devel ...


1

There is nothing that really compares to YaST for CentOS or Debian. The closest applications might be these: YUMEX : A gui for YUM Webmin Webmin is quite powerful and should do a lot of what YaST can do (v hosts, firewall, network mounts). There are several other options, comparable to Webmin.


1

You have 2 options, you can either comment out or remove the line from the /etc/fstab or you could specify the noauto option, leaving the line intact in the /etc/fstab file. Example /dev/dvd /media/dvd auto noauto,rw,user,exec 0 0


1

In /etc/fstab just make sure the entry for the DVD drive is not mentioned in there. That should take care of it.


1

X uses a variable called DISPLAY in order to determine where to send the "information" related to the display. When you use ssh -X, SSH creates a DISPLAY variable and X programs use that. When you use sudo, it gives you a restricted environment. To avoid this, you could try the command: sudo -E yast This will run yast but preserve the environment. This ...


1

I've had this happen a couple of times, due to network issues or time issues. You mentioned you were able to get to the repo via web browser. Perhaps you were loading a cached version of the site. Try the following, from a command line: rcnetwork restart zypper clean zypper ref You can go through YaST -> Network Devices -> Network Settings and disable ...


1

Are you looking for a command line approach to system configuration, or package management? If you're looking for package management, openSUSE's command line interface is primarily zypper, not yast.



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