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Click on the System menu at the upper left corner of the PuTTY window. Select Change Settings > Window > Colours. In the box that says "Select a colour to adjust", choose ANSI Blue and click the Modify Button. Slide the black arrow on the right up until you see a lighter shade of blue that you like. Click OK. Perform the same steps for ANSI Blue Bold so you ...


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vinc17 is correct: The glyph ☠, also called SKULL AND CROSSBONES, is not supported by Liberation Mono font as you can see here and here. You have to change to a font that covers this unicode (range). Fonts that support this particular glyph ☠ are listed here. To find the name and various other information of a unicode character by text, use this tool.


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The Liberation font doesn't seem to have this symbol. But using XTerm*faceName: DejaVu Sans Mono (which is also a truetype font) allows ☠ to be displayed. EDIT: Do not use LibreOffice or OpenOffice to determine whether a glyph is supported in a font, as it silently falls back to another font: OpenOffice bug 45128.


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Looking at it from the perspective of what's similar between xterm and screen: First: we're takling about emulations of this kind of real hardware device, a terminal (VT100 in this example): (from Wikimedia commons) xterm emulates one terminal showing it as a GUI window on screen screen emulates multiple terminals, but does not actually emulate the ...


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They are fundamentally different. I think the main difference is: Screen allows you to detach the session and reattach it later from a different place. For example you might have some important process running in your xterm but unfortunately your monitor breaks and you can no longer use your computer. If the process runs in screen you could now 'ssh` into ...


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you don't see actual terminals all that often anymore, but for instance the Linux text consoles on (CTRL +) ALT + F1 through F6 are considered terminals. xterm is a terminal emulator for systems running the x-window system and a graphical user interface. It provides only a single terminal, typically running a single process (an interactive shell by ...


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You can try rxvt-unicode. It fully conforms all of your listed criterias: really lightweight, on my system it only uses 0.5M memory with multiple instances unicode is fully supported, hence its name fully configurable through the Xresources file, but all configuration options has a corresponding command line option development is active, latest stable ...


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The TERM environment variable should be set by the application that is acting as your terminal. This is the whole point of the thing: letting programs running inside them know what terminal is being used and hence what sort of features it supports. Zsh is not a terminal. It is a shell. It might care what your TERM is set to if it wants to do special things, ...



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