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3

If using bash, the following should do the trick: TOLASTLINE=$(tput cup "$LINES") PS1="\[$TOLASTLINE\]$PS1"


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You should have something like: text/plain application/postscript 33 texttops in your /etc/cups/mime.convs file. So, I suppose that what needs to be done is to fix the texttops filter. Under Debian, it is /usr/lib/cups/filter/texttops, which is a shell script that uses the texttopdf filter and the pdf2ps command. You can try to replace ...


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I had the same problem and following how-to helped me to fix it: http://www.bsmdevelopment.com/Reference/Tech_20130004.html It's really good. You can even choose a font for text/plain printing like FreeMono or Courier. Cheers,


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I don't know if you consider HPLIP an external dependency, but here is the official driver recommendation directly from CUPS. CUPS Printer Driver: HP4650 and Here is the Package info in the Debian Repo:HPLIPS As Thushi states your system doesn't know how to rasterize the document without using a tool like paps. Installing the hplip package and ...


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The same can be done with paps; #!/bin/bash #This script converts UTF-8 txt to postscript paps | lpr Sometimes you need to specify the prinqueue; #!/bin/bash # This script converts UTF-8 txt to postscript paps | lpr -P lj Paps does a much better job then cups' texttops.


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It is not only for Indian fonts.Instead you can say combining characters. Most of the Indian language scripts are combining characters :-) .For example Kannada,Hindi,Tamil,Malayalam etc,etc. almost all :-) Xterm only supported Level 1 (no combining characters) of ISO 10646-1 with fixed character width and left-to-right writing direction[No Arab characters,I ...


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To answer the question of how to reset it: The xterm escape code OSC 50 ... BEL can be used to set the font (See the answer of @celtschk). Besides setting it to a font name, it can also be set to an index in the font menu you get with Ctrl and right mouse button. We can use this to reset to the default font by using the menu index 0: echo -n "\e]50;#0\a ...


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Looking at the list of xterm escape codes reveals that (esc)]50;name(bel) sets the xterm's font to the font name, or to an entry in the font menu if the first character of name is a #. The simplest way to reset it is to use the xterm's font menu (Ctrl + right mouse click) and select an entry other than Default. Alternatively, you can find out which font the ...


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When you run the script with: bash /tmp/test0& you're starting an entirely separate bash process and putting it in the background. You can't see the variables defined in that script; they belong to the other process. If you want to get access to variables defined in another file, load that file into your current bash process using the . or source ...


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(Your bash script doesn't run, there are errors). So, why is the pid not killed? Is it the wrong pid? Or maybe do you need to force it's killing using kill -9? Then, use pgrep to get the pids. Create a new xterm and store the pid in xtermPid_1: $ xtermPid_1=$(pgrep --newest xterm) (look at the man pages of pgrep, it's a nice tool)


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To support Ctrl-arrows in xterm, set the modifyKeyboard resource to at least 2. For instance: xterm -xrm "*modifyKeyboard: 2" If this doesn't have the expected behavior, perhaps your application (its key bindings) is not correctly configured. Or you can also try to modify the modifyCursorKeys resource, e.g. xterm -xrm "*modifyKeyboard: 2" -xrm ...



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