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Terminal codes might be what you need, see http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/scripting/terminalcodes and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code for details (or http://invisible-island.net/xterm/ctlseqs/ctlseqs.html for quite a technical description of the the codes relating to xterm). Here an example of how to set the title: set_title() { printf '\...


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Just output the relevant ANSI codes to stdout or stderr. The following works for me in an xterm: for i in {10..1} ; do printf '\e]0;'$i'\a' ; sleep 1 ; done & Some terminals might also provide API to change their titles programmatically.


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The source-code (runner.py) does this: term = os.environ.get('TERMCMD', os.environ.get('TERM')) if term not in get_executables(): term = 'x-terminal-emulator' if term not in get_executables(): term = 'xterm' if isinstance(action, str): action = term + ' -e ' + action else: ...


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The applications defaults files for xterm are designed to include XTerm-color using a different route. This resource *customization: -color would tell the X Toolkit library to load a resource file ending with "-color". There are several app-defaults files installed for xterm. Looking at my /etc/X11/app-defaults, these are the main ones: -rw-r--r-- 1 ...


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I struggled with this also for a while. What help with me was installing this: https://github.com/powerline/fonts And adding the line XTerm*faceName: DejaVu Sans Mono for Powerline into ~/.Xresources. After that: xrdb ~/.Xresources And then reopening xterm.


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The best way that I have found is to use a ksh93 discipline function on the PS1 environmental variable: # set ksh prompt and xterm title _PSX='$( p="${PWD/~(El)${HOME}/\~}" printf "%s@%s:%s" "${LOGNAME}" "$(hostname -s)" "${p}" )' function PS1.get { .sh.value="ESC]0;${_PSX}^G${_PSX}$ " }


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If you do not specify the cursor color, xterm will draw the cursor using the reverse of the foreground/background colors on the cell where the cursor happens to be. That's for xterm. Other programs do not behave that way. This is what the xterm manual says: cursorColor (class CursorColor) Specifies the color to use for the text cursor. The default ...


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xterm uses a single font, rather than font sets which are supported by several other terminals. The pseudo-graphic characters in this (pasted from xterm): ⎛ ⎽⎽⎽⎽⎽⎽⎽ ⎞ ⎜ ╱ 3 ⎟ ⎜ ╱ x ⎟ ⎜ ╱ ───── , 1⎟ ⎝╲╱ x + 1 ⎠ are not provided by the TypeType font specified here: xterm.vt100.faceName: Terminus xterm.vt100.faceSize: 14 ...


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We need to edit file $HOME/.vnc/xstartup with the contents below: #!/bin/sh # Uncomment the following two lines for normal desktop: # unset SESSION_MANAGER # exec /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc [ -x /etc/vnc/xstartup ] && exec /etc/vnc/xstartup [ -r $HOME/.Xresources ] && xrdb $HOME/.Xresources xsetroot -solid grey vncconfig -iconic & xterm -...


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For fonts: xterm -report-fonts For colours: xterm -report-colors


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Short: if you don't want to start a new xterm, you cannot suppress colors. Long: while you could change TERM to a description which doesn't use color (such as xterm-old), some applications do not use the terminal database. For instance, GNU ls uses its own program, which insists that vt100's are color terminals. Other programs may simply hardcode their ...


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You're referring to xorg/lib/libXt/Resource.c #define MAXRESOURCES 400 used later in the same file: } else if (num_resources >= MAXRESOURCES) { XtAppWarningMsg(XtWidgetToApplicationContext(widget), "invalidResourceCount","getResources",XtCXtToolkitError, "too many resources", (String *)NULL, (Cardinal *)NULL); return NULL; ...


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The most common cause of touchpad issues on Arch Linux, including the one you are describing, is not installing the Synaptics touchpad driver. The package is called xf86-input-synaptics Go ahead and run pacman -Syu xf86-input-synaptics and then restart X, and your touchpad should start behaving normally.



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