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3

The xterm manual shows an option which may help (added in patch #298 in 2013): -report-fonts Print a report to the standard output showing information about fonts which are loaded. This corresponds to the reportFonts resource. Also, appres is useful for showing what resources are used, e.g., ...


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Xterm does have a feature which addresses this, called dynamic abbreviation. Added in patch #188 (2004), it is optional and may not be compiled into your copy of xterm. The manual page says: dabbrev-expand() Expands the word before cursor by searching in the preceding text on the screen and in the scrollback buffer for ...


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An XTerm's size is determined by the number of characters its displaying, the font it is using, and the size of the window manager decorations (title bar, outlines, etc.). You're probably using a different (larger) font on LFS. Ubuntu's xterm settings are probably in /etc/X11/app-defaults/{XTerm,XTerm-color} (at least that's where they are in Debian). You ...


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The value of TERM is irrelevant. As I pointed out in tmux doesn't passes correctly ctrl-shift-arrow sequences, tmux has a table of xterm-style special keys which it knows about. For this case, the table xterm_keys_table has an entry for insert: { KEYC_IC, "\033[2;_~" }, which means that it normally converts any of the variations with a ...


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While you can change keys using the translations resource, there are pros/cons. If you do not use that resource, by itself xterm provides several other resources (including some that can be switched via menu entries). If you use the resource, the keys cannot be switched via the menu entry. The Home and End keys can be switched between "PC-style" ^[[H and ...


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The reset command won't help with cleanup from resizing. The resize command can be helpful, but there is a pitfall. There are two main use-cases for resize: telling the system how large the screen is when it cannot tell, e.g., connecting through a serial interface with no NAWS (negotiations about window size) support. This is useful for FAQs. repairing ...


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reset has its place, but clears your screen. If you are running xterm or anything compatible, the shortest, least intrusive thing to use would be printf '\033[?9l' That is not explicitly stated in the Mouse Tracking section of XTerm Control Sequences, but xterm allows you to reset (disable) mouse mode by turning off any of the possible modes that might be ...


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Actually, xterm does not directly use the SESSION_MANAGER variable. That is used in the Xt and SM libraries. A more direct method of disabling the session manager feature is found in the xterm manual, first in command-line options: -sm This option, corresponding to the sessionMgt resource, indicates that xterm should set up session manager ...


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There is a terminfo entry which is (ab)used for this purpose, and has been the subject of more than one bug report suggesting that it be applied to various terminal descriptions. Referring to terminfo(5): has_status_line hs hs has extra status line from_status_line fsl fs return ...



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