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13

Responding to the "[a] way to tell that a monitor has been plugged in" part of the question: The support still varies quite a bit, but with recent kernels there is some support for generating udev events when a display hotplug occurs. With kernel 2.6.38 and ATI X1400 hardware, I get an event the first time I connect a VGA display but no events on subsequent ...


8

Regarding a tool which can store monitor configuration profiles on a per-user and per-display basis, autorandr will do exactly that. https://github.com/wertarbyte/autorandr. My laptop has an NVIDIA card, so I use the disper backend instead of xrandr: http://willem.engen.nl/projects/disper/. Autorandr will use disper as the backend to manage your monitors if ...


7

Check out: http://howto-pages.org/ModeLines/ , they have a good explanation of Xorg modelines. Then go to http://xtiming.sourceforge.net/cgi-bin/xtiming.pl and input the specs for the size of the screen that you can use. This will give you a Modeline that you can add to your xorg.conf file. Fields 4, 5, 6, & 7 correspond to the following valudes: ...


7

I'm using this simple (homemade) script that keeps polling RandR and switches between LVDS1 and VGA1 when VGA gets connected/disconnected. It's a dirty solution, yet it's working just fine. It's customized for my setup: you'll most likely need to change RandR output names (LVDS1 and VGA1) and unlike me you'll probably be fine with your RandR default mode ...


4

Your desktop environment probably has a way, but you don't say which one you're using (if any). If your display driver is compatible with the XRandR extension, which is the standard X.org method for managing display resolutions and arrangements, you can use the command-line utility xrandr. I think the proprietary NVidia driver bypasses XRandR, so if you're ...


4

I used the udev rule suggested above along with a shell script that looks like #!/bin/sh dmode="$(cat /sys/class/drm/card0-VGA-1/status)" export DISPLAY=:0 export XAUTHORITY=/home/yourusername/.Xauthority ...


4

xrandr is executed, but fails. You should read its error messages, they would tell you what's wrong. You could just put all the output from your script in the log file, by adding this line just after the #! line: exec >/home/hoppe/udev.out 2>&1 You'll find that the message is: Can't open display Like any other X program, xrandr talks to the ...


4

With the help of the guys who commented on my question, I figured out what was wrong and fixed it in the script. Here now the updated routines how to get automatic screen switching with your laptop to work. You need acpid, kms and udev. Create the following rules for acpi and udev /etc/acpi/events/lidclose # Pass all events to our one handler script ...


4

This occurs becaues you have another screen already active, in this case DP2. DP2 here is a monitor running off of a DisplayPort. The laptop is a Lenovo x230 and it was booted with an Ultrabase 3 docking station. You can resolve this issue by simply turning off the screen using, xrandr --output DP2 --off Now, in XFCE or similar workstation you should see ...


4

I'm sure there's a better way, I think this is all handled by udev now but if you know that those commands will solve it, you could always just make them into a script: #!/usr/bin/env bash cvt 1600 1200 xrandr --newmode "1600x1200_60.00" 161.00 1600 1712 1880 2160 1200 1203 1207 1245 -hsync +vsync xrandr --addmode VGA-1 1600x1200_60.00 Make it ...


4

If you are using the Nvidia proprietary driver then nvdia-settings should be the GUI tool to configure the Xorg.conf file. It should have its own package in Linux Mint, so installing would be as simple as: sudo apt-get install nvidia-settings This should put an icon in your menu somewhere, you can run it from there (though I'm not sure how you get it to ...


3

I am not sure if you have created the string following xrandr --newmode by yourself or have you copied it from somewhere else, but it won't work in its current form. I recommend to do it step by step. First, you need to generate the new mode. I recommend using 60Hz with LCD or 85Hz with CRT monitor gtf 1280 1024 60 You will get something like: # ...


3

Your color and flicker issues are probably due to a bad driver. You should check with your manufacture and distro to make sure you are running the latest drivers and whatever kernel is recommended as working best with them. Unfortunately some hardware manufactures to not reveal how their hardware works, nor provide good drivers for Linux. This leaves the ...


3

This is what the Open Build Service's search came up with: apparently, someone (AlexFrost) created a package. I suspect you can just use these binaries. (I have no idea if this Build Service is already somehow integrated with the standard distribution tools, I guess it is?)


3

As it was revealed on chat, the actual problem lied in /etc/hosts not set up to recognize the local hostname. On some systems, including FreeBSD, the Xorg will halt trying to query the hostname of your machine before it becomes usable. So before starting X, one should ensure that the /etc/hosts file contains at least the line 127.0.0.1 localhost ...


3

The problem is not RandR, your video driver is not configuring the monitor based on the EDID information from the Monitor. Check the Xorg?.log file to see how the driver is configuring the monitor. It is possible to configure the monitor in the xorg.conf configuration. I haven't tried this for a plug and play setup. Configuring a dual monitor setup ...


3

Figured it out. I should have run xrandr --output HDMI-0 --mode 1280x1024 --right-of DVI-0 with sudo. That way normal applications don't have access to Randr's setup (resolution etc.), and so can't break anything. Edit: Actually, it helped with only one game (Osmos). For others, monitor is still losing signal, but I can at least run xrandr again to restore ...


3

In the early 90's there was indeed the danger of breaking CRT displays when setting too high frequency, but I don't think this is still a big problem. Modern CRTs should just refuse to work with unsupported frequencies. Still with any CRT there is some danger, at least this is what wikipedia says... Wrong resolution doesn't do any harm.


2

I am not aware of such a tool and I guess that not a lot of hardware support the generation of such events (an Intel related discussion). And polling would not be a very elegant solution - would waste CPU cycles and energy.


2

xrandr is a tool to modify your X session settings at runtime. The --addmode option is used to force the Xrandr extension to use an output mode that was not detected at Xorg startup (not save the mode in some configuration file). It may be that you use xrandr --addmode HDMI-0 1920x1080 unnecessarily. The Xorg server might detect that mode, but not use it as ...


2

Current version of RandR protocol does not allow to use multiple graphic devices. It is expected to be implemented in RandR 2.0, but there is no estimate time of release (so do not expect it in the next two years). You might want to see (for example) here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RandR However, it might be possible to configure your monitors without ...


2

Disable X11 forwarding (using -x switch to ssh) and set the DISPLAY environment variable for machine B. For example, this will tell you the settings for :0 on machine B: ssh -x machineB DISPLAY=:0 xrandr


2

I found this thread with a solution titled: How Do I Save Xrandr Settings?, that might help you: You can use this command to get your current settings: $ xrandr --verbose Using that command you could figure out what your current display is set to and put the following example types of lines in your $HOME/.xinitrc file: xrandr --newmode "1920x1080_60.00" ...


2

So you've tried four OSs, including Windows, and it didn't work with any of them? Then it's very likely to be a hardware problem. The data in aplay -L doesn't preclude a hardware problem because that information comes from your audio chipset, not the actual HDMI port. If it's still under warranty, contact the manufacturer.


2

You might want to take a look at this page, titled: XSF / How to use xrandr. For starters you could try this command: $ xrandr --output VGA1 --right-of LVDS1 You can control the orientation of the monitors with respect to each other using these switches: --right-of --left-of --above --below


2

Setting the resolution is what the xrandr source does if you specify the --same-as relation: case relation_same_as: output->x = relation->x; output->y = relation->y; have you tried: xrandr --output HDMI1 --mode 1920x1080 --output LSVD1 --mode 1600x900 --same-as HDMI1 ?


2

Lead #1: monitor-edid I'm not that up on EDID and monitors but I did find this tool, monitor-edid which might be of use to you here as well. Forgive me if it's off base, I'm trying to also learn more about this space, given the variety of questions you ask on the topic. $ monitor-edid EISA ID: LEN4036 EDID version: 1.3 EDID extension blocks: 0 Screen ...


2

Judging from the question it is a standard coordinate transform matrix. So: ⎡x_out⎤ ⎡ a b c ⎤ ⎡ x_in ⎤ ⎜y_out⎥ = ⎜ d e f ⎥ * ⎜ y_in ⎥ ⎣z_out⎦ ⎣ 0 0 1 ⎦ ⎣ z_in ⎦ with z_out = z_in = 1. I.e. x_out = a * x_in + b * y_in + c y_out = d * x_in + e * y_in + f The example matrix you gave for right rotation ⎡ 0 -1 1 ⎤ ⎜ 1 0 0 ⎥ ⎣ 0 0 1 ⎦ thus ...


2

There is a bug in Xfce that always sets the left most monitor or the upper monitor to the primary monitor, if you reconfigure the monitors with xrandr. So you have to either move the panels and etc by hand, or move the monitor to the right.


1

You will have to fiddle around how to best make displaymanagers use it, but: You can start your Xorg normally which will use your entire screen at full resolution, e.g. Xorg :123 -ac The -ac switch disables some (all?) of Xorgs restrictions it may have on allowing clients. Then you start Xephyr as the only client (you may want to adapt the resolution ...



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