Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Xorg --configure while X is not running did it for me - I'm on debian Sid (unstable). You MUST NOT have X running when you do this, and must be in a console TTY. (ctrl-alt-f1/f2/f3/f4/f5/f6) If Xorg.conf doesn't change after doing this, and the program didn't return an error but printed an Xorg.conf configuration file to the screen, do Xorg --configure ...


0

Is Grand Theft Auto 3: San Andreas's 800x600x32 resolution just for the menu to work? If not you can emulate such a window using Wine and then in the game's menu set your specific resolution. If yes, then you may also try using xrandr's scaling arguments: --scale xxy Changes the dimensions of the output picture. Values superior to 1 will ...


3

A pretty quick search would likely yield xev as a result. It will not show you everything that is pressed or typed in X ever. But rather, will allow you to see information about keycodes and mouse movements. However, with the -root option, you might be able to get xev to monitor the whole X session. Note, if you do this, you'll make it pretty difficult to ...


2

There is a bug in Xfce that always sets the left most monitor or the upper monitor to the primary monitor, if you reconfigure the monitors with xrandr. So you have to either move the panels and etc by hand, or move the monitor to the right.


0

A small program that waits for the X server to notify it about changed monitor configuration, and then executes a given command (e.g. the autorandr mentioned in another answer) is available at: https://bitbucket.org/portix/srandrd/overview This seems to be a cleaner solution that using udev (where you have to worry about finding the right X server etc.)


0

I guess people looking at this question are not those that want to use GNOME, and those that use GNOME wouldn’t have to look at this question, but in the interest of completeness: GNOME has this functionality built-in. If you change the setup via gnome-control-center, gnome-settings-daemon remembers it (in .config/monitors.xml) and automatically applies it ...


1

Changing only MaxSpeed is not enough. I've changed MinSpeed from 1 to 20 and MaxSpeed from 1.75 to 40 and the touchpad is usable again.


4

Turns out the was fallout of an attempt to get coordinate scaling working better with external monitors. That was trying to fix to pointer speed changing if adding an external monitor changes the aspect ratio. It, however, apparently didn't work with a at least some devices and caused this bug.¹ Thus, they reverted the change, especially since it turned out ...


2

You can use the functionality built into most media players to manage this; it works efectively with xautolock and it's lockers. mpv and mplayer both have a screensaver options: --stop-screensaver, --no-stop-screensaver Turns off the screensaver (or screen blanker and similar mechanisms) at startup and turns it on again on exit (default: yes). The ...


3

A quick check of the source code of the current version, xautolock 2.2, shows that it doesn't support this feature, although it wouldn't be too hard to implement it yourself if you know a little bit about C and how to write X programs. The reason is probably this: whenever you want to know the status of xautolock, you also know what status you would like it ...


2

You can use xrandr. I have tested this breathy on a single monitor. First look at current resolution and subtract 228 from X. Replace X and Y below for new resolutions Y=y, X=x-228. (note in the text below lower case x is a literal x). Run xrandr to get output name. Then xrandr --fb XxY --output OUTPUT_NAME --transform 1,0,-228,0,1,0,0,0,1


2

In /etc/default/grub I changed this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text nomodeset acpi_backlight=legacy" to: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text nomodeset" update-grub, reboot, and start mdm by hand: /etc/init.d/mdm start No idea why the backlight should suddenly break.


0

You may try the sux command: sux user2 sux will handle the $DISPLAY stuff for you. You may need to install it with: sudo apt-get install sux under Debian/Ubuntu.


3

You can place the copy of the .Xauthority file wherever you want and then: export XAUTHORITY=/path/to/.Xauthority Then any programs launched which try to connect to X will use that Xauthority file.


2

On Debian 7: install and use tightvncserver or vnc4server. You probably have similar packages on your system (maybe without the 4). type apt-cache search vnc | grep -v lib | grep server on any debian based system (including Ubuntu, mint, elementary). X11vnc is the vnc server that connects to an existing X11 server, useful for tech support to help a user ...


0

I don’t think this is possible, because there can always only be one window that receives input from mice and keyboards, i.e. one window that has the focus. But you can run the program you want to automate in a separate X-server. So do X :1 & export DISPLAY=:1 myprogram & xdotool … This way you can also use the whole screen. The downside to this ...


0

After fiddling with the kernel's USB / HID settings, I finally got it working. I don't know /why/ it works, but for now I'm picking my battles. I'm attaching a diff between the non-working config, and the working one in the hopes that it might help some lost soul in the future (more likely to be myself after I forget what the solution was :P). The < ...


0

I have now figured out that the stuck pixel is caused by Citrix. It's some kind of bug in the way Citrix interacts with X I guess.


0

what you describe sounds very similar to a problem I frequently have when installing user PCs with nvidia cards and proprietary drivers (debian wheezy and jessie) - I'm usually able to solve it using the following procedure and the attached xorg.conf file (I remember trying the one from the Debian wiki site once, but something must have been wrong, or I ...


1

I do have a dead pixel on my screen that can disappear by gently pressing the screen or by rebooting perhaps it is a dead pixel. Try to find if it is a dead pixel. You can set the screen to a lower resolution. If the spot is bigger the problem is a display bug. If the size didn't change, your screen has a "dead pixel" You can also boot another Linux ...


0

I have worked out how to do this. First, you have to set the XCURSOR_DISCOVER environment variable before running the program that is setting the mouse cursor, in my case, rdesktop: $ XCURSOR_DISCOVER=1 rdesktop ... This will then print out bitmaps and hashes of each cursor once only when they are set for the first time. Here is what it spat out when ...


5

You should be able to use xrandr to turn off a given display. $ xrandr --output CRT1 --off To re-enable it: $ xrandr --output CRT1 --auto You can see the names of your output displays using xrandr -q: $ xrandr -q Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1440 x 900, maximum 8192 x 8192 LVDS1 connected primary 1440x900+0+0 (normal left inverted right x ...


0

i had this BadMatch Error problem until i deleted a previously added "1280x1024_60.00" because it could never use the double quoted mode successfully. Eventually, realized a better name for the mode helped. So i deleted "1280x1024_60.00" by running the following as a normal user: $ xrandr --version reports 1.4.0 and 1.4 $ xrandr | grep 1280 #Do you see ...



Top 50 recent answers are included