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2

You're referring to xorg/lib/libXt/Resource.c #define MAXRESOURCES 400 used later in the same file: } else if (num_resources >= MAXRESOURCES) { XtAppWarningMsg(XtWidgetToApplicationContext(widget), "invalidResourceCount","getResources",XtCXtToolkitError, "too many resources", (String *)NULL, (Cardinal *)NULL); return NULL; ...


0

I just finished setting up a ~150% zoom under Cinnamon, hope this will help you too because GNOME is similar to Cinnamon. I started with xrandr commands from this HiDPI ArchWiki article: xrandr --output HDMI1 --scale 1.2x1.2 # try 1.3 also xrandr --output HDMI1 --panning 2304x1296 # this is for 1920x1080 at 1.2 Then i wanted to set it permanent, tried ...


0

X doesn't support scaling via xorg.conf or similar, only via xrandr. You can configure panning over a larger virtual display, but that won't help you increase the size of what's on the display. However, you may be able to get an approximation to the fractional scaling you want via a combination of a couple of changes. First, reduce the overall scaling ...


0

The Tiger's x0vncserver could help share the existing X server regardless of the desktop in use: NAME x0vncserver - TigerVNC Server for X displays SYNOPSIS x0vncserver [options] x0vncserver -version DESCRIPTION x0vncserver is a TigerVNC Server which makes any X display remotely accessible via VNC, TigerVNC or compatible ...


-1

If you would like a secure channel, then you can use ssh. You would need to enable X11 forwarding on both the client and server (/etc/ssh/ssh_config and /etc/ssh/sshd_config, X11Forwarding, TrustedX11Forwarding).


2

I think you use, Vino. Vino is the GNOME desktop sharing server. This (vino) is default package in most of the distribution along with gnome.


0

The third mouse button can be enabled system wide by adding a file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/20-3rdbutton.conf with the following content: Section "InputClass" Identifier "middle button" MatchIsPointer "on" MatchDriver "libinput" Option "MiddleEmulation" "on" EndSection I use this on my HP nc2400 with Fedora 23, and it works. The source of this ...


0

Clean xrandr output for imagemagick use xrandr |grep \* |awk '{print $1}'


0

(Trying to improve @shcherbak answer.) To get info about the running display server write in the console: ps -e | grep tty7 For example I get as output 1477 tty7 00:00:27 Xorg . So I am running Xorg, i.e., X11. Explanation: tty7 is the terminal where you have the GUI in your linux system. Therefore, this should be the terminal where the display ...


-1

users=$(who | awk '{print $1}') for user in $users<br> do DISPLAY=:0 sudo -u $user notify-send "hello!!" done


0

I can recommend reading the ArchLinux wiki pages on this subject, as it will have much in common with a recent Ubuntu now that both use systemd. There are a lot of new problems introduced by having session permissions, and being able to run the X server without it being setuid root. Start by setting up a auto login to a VT, then run startx or xinit from ...


2

Well, for one thing, you are running three separate external programs when one would be enough. You could do all the parsing and arithmetic in awk for example: xrandr --output LVDS-1 --brightness $(xrandr --prop --verbose | awk "/Brightness:/{print \$2 $1 0.1; exit}") The exit in the awk script ensures that it doesn't need to parse the whole output ...


2

Since you've already enabled backports, I'd suggest trying the latest backported kernel, 4.5.1-1~bpo8+1 as of this writing. The kernel's Intel GPU driver has been vastly improved since 3.16, and should be much more stable.


1

If code is already working but running too slowly, the next step is to start profiling. When shell scripting, you can use time (try help time to see its help page) to see how long each command takes to run. I think bc should be very fast; sed against one line should also be very fast; and grep should be pretty quick, too, so I decided to try profiling the ...


2

The question sounds a bit contradictory since you're citing X tools but ask for a solution that "ideally should work without X". About your 4th finding: xinput will give you the correspondence $ xinput list-props 11 Device 'AT Translated Set 2 keyboard': Device Enabled (145): 1 Coordinate Transformation Matrix (147): 1.000000, 0.000000, 0.000000, ...


0

While I was working through clearkimura’s answer, I found the method I had been using before to make windows stay opaque. Enter this command in a terminal, and then click on the window that you want: xprop -f _NET_WM_WINDOW_OPACITY_LOCKED 32c -set _NET_WM_WINDOW_OPACITY_LOCKED 1 That sets a window property that causes Xfce to leave the window opacity ...


1

This is not possible. The X server knows which display number it's handling and it doesn't have an interface to change that. (Ok, technically it's possible by running a debugger on the X server process and issuing the right commands. The wrong commands will crash the X server if you're lucky. This is not likely to succeed.) Whatever problem you're trying ...


3

There is a way to add users to a given display and remove users from a given display, but not to just swap. You could do this by having each user run xauth to add the other user to their display, and then using xauth to remove themselves from the original screen. That seems like a lot of work, since it involves copying authorization data from one account ...


2

Use Devilspie2 to set the window type to "Utility" for selective applications. This window type will not be affected by "Opacity of inactive windows" in Xfce environment. Preliminary setup Install Devilspie2 from the repository (available in Debian and Ubuntu repositories), then create a new configuration file at $HOME/.config/devilspie2 with the following ...


0

xdpyinfo should tell you what you want to know.


0

First identify which glx module is in use: $ cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log | grep glx [ 3.622] (II) LoadModule: "glx" [ 3.624] (II) Loading /usr/lib/xorg/modules/extensions/libglx.so [ 3.705] (II) Module glx: vendor="NVIDIA Corporation" In Debian 8 Jessie my solution was to remove glx-alternative-nvidia package. So after reboot: $ cat ...



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