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1

Use http://sourceforge.net/projects/perwindowlayout/. I tried and it works well for me on fluxbox. It makes advantage of grp option: grp Key(s) to change layout In example http://sourceforge.net/projects/perwindowlayout/files setxkbmap is used like this: setxkbmap -layout 'us,ru(winkeys)' -model pc105 -option ...


2

It's a timestamp. It indicates the time since the system last booted, in seconds. If you are running Linux then you can find the same number as the first field of the contents of /proc/uptime.


0

Well the xrdb -merge does set new defaults, but the window manager overrides them with his own settings. These might be read from a config file on wm start. F.e. kwin gets these from ~/.kde/share/config/kcminputrc. Changing that file and doing a kwin --replace will apply the new cursor settings to all apps started thereafter. Find out where your WM stores ...


0

I have exactly the same problem. I've "solved" it by using the following script package: https://www.dropbox.com/s/gwmebvpz70oj9c6/MXB_AltGR_XKB.tar.gz?dl=0 This is a series of scripts which install the kb in the lists and allow it to be selected from the list of installable keyboards. It must be run as root with sudo. It also features an uninstall ...


0

This turns out to be related to a BIOS setting. I don't know if this setting has the same name in every BIOS, but in mine (AMIBIOS) it's called iGPU Multi-monitor. (It can be found in the Advanced > System Agent Configuration > Graphics section.) Set it to [Disabled], and the TTYs will appear on the PCI-E GPU's monitor.


2

In principle, you should be able to do it with the venerable xset command. xset led named 'Caps Lock' or xset led 4 to set LED number 4, if your system doesn't recognize the LEDs by name. However, this doesn't seem to work reliably. On my machine, I can only set Scroll Lock this way, and I'm not the only one. This seems to be a matter of XKB ...


23

Short answer: Yes. In the "olden days", it was possible to effectively prevent any other X application from reading a specific input by grabbing it. While this can still be done to this day, the XI2 protocol specification seems to suggest that this can't be done any more (see the description of Raw Events around line 2220). Thus under X alone you are not ...


1

I'll take a quick guess it depends on some DRI devices. It might also depend on the ability to muck around with PCI memory ranges and things like that, and making those readable by the Xorg user would do more harm to security than having X be non-root. So, securing X by having it run non-root might not actually improve security (thought it could make an ...


0

This is its organization, you'll learn more from this picture that from several pages of text:


0

I believe you need a Screen section in your xorg.conf file. If no xorg.conf file exists the server tries to guess the best rate, which in this case is 32 bpp, which is also the Max for most Graphics Adapters. I found this Example in the Linear Addressing Section of the Information for Tseng Chipset Users Guide (Even though the document says XFree86, the ...


0

I found the answer here: https://www.archlinux.org/news/xorg-server-116-is-now-available/ X is now rootless with the help of systemd-logind, this also means that it must be launched from the same virtual terminal as was used to log in, redirecting stderr also breaks rootless login. The old root execution behavior can be restored through the ...


0

This from your pasted log indicates to me you may have a driver issue: [ 418.581] (II) LoadModule: "vesa" [ 418.582] (WW) Warning, couldn't open module vesa [ 418.582] (II) UnloadModule: "vesa" [ 418.582] (II) Unloading vesa [ 418.582] (EE) Failed to load module "vesa" (module does not exist, 0) Try: pacman -S extra/xf86-video-vesa Or if you ...


0

Try dropping your system into single-user mode To do this (I'm going to assume you're using GRUB, instructions are similar for other bootloaders), hold shift during bootup. Select the default entry and modify it. Append single to the end of the boot options When the system boots up, it should drop you into a fully functional terminal Alternatively, if ...


0

Installing fglrx(catalyst-total from the AUR) fixed the problem, probably the xf86 driver had some problems with the graphic card DisplayPort.


2

xhost +SI:localuser:lightdm allows the lightdm user to access the running X server. The current X server is indicated by the DISPLAY environment variable. The manpage has reasonably good explanations: [+]name The given name (the plus sign is optional) is added to the list allowed to connect to the X server. The name can be a host ...


0

I have a RHEL 7 laptop with 2 external Full HD monitors. Even though the laptop lid was closed the GNOME was displaying on it. I got half a clue when I <ctrl>+<F2> and was able to log in on the external monitors which were now operating in mirror mode. I confirmed GNOME was running and had no errors, I just could not see it....until I lifted ...


0

In some cases switching virtual consoles will work. sometimes you may be able to ssh in and reset the video card but It has been a long time since I have done this. In some cases using vnc will allow you to preserve your session across a x server restart, but it won't help if you have to reboot. but other than that ... no, not realy


1

The nvidia kernel module must be rebuilt with each kernel update because the nvidia.komodule is built and placed in the modules directory for each kernel. This occurs for a few reasons (off the top of my head): The module is binary. Each build requires access to the new kernel headers. The dkms mode switching interferes with the binary module. The ...


2

It seems that Arch Linux no longer places the default config files in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d, it now leaves that wholly to system-specific (user-made) config files. Note: Arch supplies default configuration files in /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d, and no extra configuration is necessary for most setups. Xorg uses a configuration file called xorg.conf ...


1

The default X config files live in /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d in arch. You can still put them in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d if you want.


0

Use a displaymanager, which supports scripts like Xreset and Xsession, for example kdm and configure it for auto login. $ head -n5 /etc/kde4/kdm/Xreset #! /bin/sh # Xreset - run as root after session exits # Reassign ownership of the console to root, this should disallow # assignment of console output to any random users's xterm. See Xstartup. There you ...


0

Section "Extensions" Option "Composite" "Enable" EndSection That is your problem --> XINERAMA does not work with 3d effects Remove the compiz effects and xinerama will work out-of-the-box really well.



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