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0

This is by no means a full answer, but the arch manual(Buttonless touchpads (aka ClickPads)) has some info on how to fix it. I will look into it more when I have time.


3

Read through this helpful page of the Arch Wiki: Systemd Targets. Systemd targets are roughly equivalent to the old runlevels when everything used the init system. Change your target from 5(multi-user graphical) to 3(multi-user no graphics). This should drop you into a terminal login screen upon boot. If you want to go graphical just type "startx."


1

Pressing Ctrl+Z does suspend the application, as in, it stops running until resumed with a SIGCONT (possibly sent through the fg or bg command in the shell). But… You're running xinit, not firefox. Pressing Ctrl+Z sends a STOP signal to the application that's running in the foreground, not to other applications that it may have run. So you've only suspended ...


2

Firefox puts itself in the background and detaches from your terminal if you run it from a terminal. Therefore pressing Ctrl+Z is not really suspending Firefox, it probably suspends xinit. wget and most commandline programs do not have this kind of detaching behaviour. GUI based programs like gedit start mostly like firefox and detach. I looked if there ...


2

For occational use you could plug xtrace between your client and your server and make the client not see any extensions by using xtrace's -e switch: -e | --denyextensions Modify all server replies to say there are no extensions available. (As xtrace does supports only a small number of extensions anyway and calls all extended ...


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There are 2 sorts of hostname entries managed by xauth, local names such as myhost/unix:0 and remote names such as remote:0. The latter are held as ip addresses, but I imagine you are referring to the local names. The hostname part of these are not actually of any significance to X11, but can be used by the xdm tools to distinguish between several local ...


0

Try to add something like this into your xorg.conf or under xorg.conf.d folder: Section "InputClass" Identifier "disable broken device" MatchIsTouchscreen "on" MatchProduct "full product name from 'xinput list'" Option "Ignore" "on" EndSection


1

OK, I figured out that I have to jump to another tty screen on the box, login, and issue startx from there.


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Solution That I Have Settled With This issue still plagues me somewhat, but I have mashed together a multi-pronged solution that gets very close to what the original question was seeking, to the point that I am marking this issue "resolved". 1.) Remove the xorg.conf changes These changes to xorg.conf from the OP can be removed, as the functionality will ...


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This solution will work globally and preserve the middle mouse functionality. Install xbindkeys xsel xdotool Place this in ~/.xbindkeysrc "echo -n | xsel -n -i; pkill xbindkeys; xdotool click 2; xbindkeys" b:2 + Release Reload xbindkeys -p Run xbindkeys on startup, pkill xbindkeys to stop.


1

You can test this without the rest of pymouse by firing up python and running from Xlib.display import Display display = Display() display.record_create_context which should print <bound method Display.create_context of <Xlib.display.Display instance at ...>> Looks like that corresponds to $ xdpyinfo | grep -i record RECORD (that's ...


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In the end I couldn't find a suitable solution to my problem and so I wrote my own program to solve it. xeventbind will fire up your script when the resolution changes. Here's a link to github repository


1

With debian or based on, you can add this option : XKBOPTIONS="terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp" to /etc/default/keyboard file


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I am happy to report that CentOS 7-1511 uses Xorg-server 1.17.2, which does not suffer from the accessibility bug. Therefore that version can be used without patching.


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No, there's no KeyHold event, only KeyPress and KeyRelease. KeyPress is sent when the key is pressed, and sent again after a certain amount of time. The time can be configured with xset r (there are two times: time to first repeat, and time to subsequent repeats). A KeyRelease event is sent when the key is actually released (it is not sent while the key is ...


1

Xorg logs to /var/log/Xorg.n.log where n is the server log file for display n. In newer implementations1, the log file may be found at $HOME/.local/share/xorg/Xorg.n.log. The log will contain all of the currently loaded values for the running display, including any configuration options loaded through conf files in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/. 1. From Xorg ...


1

I have no installation to test this, but it seems there might be a "Cinnamon Maximus" extension that removes decorations from fullscreen windows, if your application can go fullscreen, albeit with borders. Aternatively, you might try something radical like setting the window's overrideredirect flag. This asks the window manager not to manage the window. ...


1

If you only want to change the DPI within i3, you could put the command in your i3 config file with the line: exec xrandr --dpi 220 Depending on your distro you will find the config file in different places but often under ~/.config/i3/config


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Actually, there does not seem to be any standard way of doing. There is a most obvious solution: from within the network namespace, start an ssh server, then connect to it from any remote machine with the usual option, ssh -Y me@network.namespace.IP.address then any graphical program can be started on the remote machine's X11 server. All sorts of ...


2

Add the following section: Section "ServerLayout" Identifier "Layout[all]" InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard" InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer" Option "AutoAddDevices" "off" EndSection To find the correct mouse and keyboard drivers, I suggest you inspect /var/log/Xorg.0.log before you turn udev off: you will see which driver it ...


0

~/.ssh/config: Host REMOTEHOST ... ForwardX11 yes /etc/ssh/sshd_config: X11Forwarding yes bash: $ xclip -o | ssh REMOTEHOST 'DISPLAY=:0 xclip -i'


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Ok, with help from this thread I got it working. Although that poster said it didn't work, I edited .config/chromium/Default/Preferences and explicitly set the window size: Before "window_placement": { "bottom":1060, "docked":false, "left":10, "maximized":true, "right":950, "top":10 // ... After "window_placement": { ...


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You can try --start-fullscreen Specifies if the browser should start in fullscreen mode, like if the user had pressed F11 right after startup. as listed by Peter Beverloo's automatic web page of options.


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Many applications support a command line option -geometry or --geometry with a geometry specification as argument. The geometry can specify the window size, the position, or both. A position indirectly specifies the monitor, since all monitors are notionally organized on a plane. To see how your monitors are organized, run xrandr; an indication like ...


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To my knowledge, VIRTUAL1 is created automatically, or when I undock my laptop from dock with additional screen still turned on. For some reason, X11 keeps all my apps on virtual desktop which I don't actually see (but I can still move a mouse there). I noticed that my secondary display (DP2) was disconnected, but still initialized: [lzap@lzapx ~]$ xrandr ...



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