Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Since @Bob says there's no runtime configuration option for this and I didn't want to rebuild gdm3 from patched source, I took the following approach. First, move the real X server aside: sudo dpkg-divert --local --rename --add /usr/bin/Xorg Then drop a new shell script in place of /usr/bin/Xorg: #!/bin/sh test -x /usr/local/bin/Xorg && exec ...


7

On Ubuntu, some people have had luck doing this using Compiz Config Setting Manager. Run it and under Accessibility category, you'll find Color Filter and Opacity, Brightness and Saturation filters. There you'll be get the desired effect with the available options. You can try options related to Grayscale or decrease saturation to zero to get the black and ...


4

Besides InputClass there also exists a section called InputDevice which takes nearly the exact same options as InputClass. Of course you cannot use the Match* operators but have to give the device's path explicitly: Section "InputDevice" Identifier "touchpad" Driver "synaptics"   Option "Device" "/dev/input/event<X>" Option ...


1

If you install the nvidia-331 package, the old one will be automatically deleted. If your graphic card is ok with this version of drivers, so go ahead.


1

Idea #1 - gnome-session-proerties Depending on how you'd like to solve this I can think of one way which should "just work". I would create an application that runs when you login and add a shell script to this list that runs this particular command. This will enforce the running of this any time you login. #!/bin/bash xinput set-button-map "ETPS/2 ...


3

You could do this with by configuring your keyboards separately. For example I use US English layout on my laptop keyboard and have a Sun Type 6 USB keyboard with german layout and I have the following in my /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/10-evdev.conf: # Default configuration for all keyboards not handled explicitly Section "InputClass" Identifier "evdev ...


2

The xrandr command is the one you are looking for. An example usage is: xrandr --output HDMI1 --auto --same-as LVDS1 You can have --left-of, --right-of. Run xrandr on its own to see the different outputs that are available.


1

Use xrand command without args for view your output names and the supported resolutions. Once you have this informations, you can setup a screen like this (this is an example, there is a lot of others options): xrand --output <output> --mode <resolution> --right-of/--left-of <output> You can also just reactivate your screen with: xrand ...


1

I use "setxkbmap" with no arguments. It seems to reset the keyboard. I have a "shortcut" in my panel that I can use with a mouse for when the keyboard is completely inoperable.


0

You can use -display :HOST:DISPLAY to chose display to apply dpms setting like this: xset -display :0 dpms force off


1

Martin- Very similar setup on my end, except with a pair of nvidia GT9800's - circa 2008!. Also an onboard Intel HD4000 (disabled in bios). xrandr only showed 1 gpu, though all other sys related tools properly reported both. ubuntu 14.04 lts beta 2, nvidia 331.28 proprietary The holy grail fix for me last night was: Base Mosaic! Empty xorg.conf, nvidia x ...


3

I would take a look at this guide from the CrashPlan website titled: CONFIGURING A HEADLESS CLIENT. It spells out the details of how one would go about installing CrashPlan for use in a headless situation, which is really what you want. But I just want to disable the GUI If you're using a desktop environment such as GNOME you can launch the configuration ...


0

1: Have you tried hooking up the integrated graphics? You mentioned in your comment that you only have one connection to one of the Radeon cards. If you do hook it up and want both integrated and PCIe graphics, it sounds like you have to enable "surround view" in BIOS. 2: On your first login, when the interface is slow, look in /var/log/Xorg.0.log to see if ...


0

The thread https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=179120 indicates some recently introduced problem with the Intel driver (see also https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=75345). As was to be expected from that discussion, the problem only occurs with DVI cable. After switching to a DisplayPort cable, my full resolution was back.


3

What makes you think X-related processes are still running? When you log in remotely xrdp (re-)connects you to your GUI environment. If you don't have one running already then xrdp-sesman will cause a GUI environment to get initialized. (If you want to prevent that you could sudo service xrdp stop although it will likely come back on re-boot unless you ...


0

Apparently Shift+Insert may not work properly on some installations of GTK 3, at least on FreeBSD. The issue is described as: Shift-Insert is not pasting primary selection. Instead, it is bound to paste the clipboard (for which Control-V is already used). Hence, there is no keyboard-only way to insert primary selection. One must drag the mouse to ...


0

I searched a bit further in Google and found the solution: I needed to boot with the nomodeset option. After adding this to the grub.cfg file the issue was solved.


0

I found it today by accident! Configure two-finger tap as right button click. Then tap with two fingers, but drag with single finger.


0

It seems like the problem in this case was a hardware problem, not a software one. After getting a replacement mouse I no longer have any problems. The strange thing is that I didn't have any real issues in Windows, but I guess that's some kind of smoothing process being applied by the OS or the drivers.


0

If your code of C# has the GUI, you need assign a $DISPLAY to it. You can give $DISPLAY first with echo $DISPLAY at your remote linux. If you want to use the RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol), you can install package of xrdp. $ sudo apt-get install xrdp connection to remote server (Remmina, ). open terminal and get $DISPLAY. $echo $DISPLAY :10.0 run mono ...


3

I'd better answer my own question for future reference. After a bit of in-depth research, I found out that xmodmap is actually deprecated and is roughly patched over the xkb keyboard model. The xkb model doesn't use a linear array of alternatives, but splits layouts into groups, with each group having a couple of characters in different shift levels. The ...


0

Launch dconf-editor and go to org.gnome.desktop.input-sources.xkb-options. It should be like this: If you don't see 'terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp' you should add it there.


0

If you're just logged into a system that doesn't have a X desktop running then no you won't be able to make use of xfreerdp or any such application that requires the use of a GUI. Remember that the X desktop is driving the videocard & monitor locally and is providing a basis (the X protocol) on which other graphical applications can also display GUIs ...


1

To answer the stated question, you can make sure whether the Xserver is running by issuing command: ps -C Xorg


1

Sounds like you're missing the video driver and X is defaulting to a generic video driver. For example, if your video card is an AMD, you need the radeon XF86 video drivers, and if you're running inside a virtual machine you need the vmware or virtualbox drivers. These drivers are part of X, and to put an example, in Debian they appear on the package manager ...



Top 50 recent answers are included