Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

At least on Debian-based systems such as Ubuntu there is a utility called xtrlock (1) available through the package repositories. This utility locks the keyboard and mouse until the password is entered while leaving windows visible. I find it useful for computers running information displays and the like.


1

Does your user can't just click on icon which will run xkbcomp or xmodmap which will load the layout?


1

Ditto! I was having this problem too while installing arch on Virtualbox. It was fixed after I did the following. 1) Execute the following to install "mesa" and virtualbox support: pacman -S mesa pacman -S virtualbox-guest-utils 2) Open "/etc/modules-load.d/virtualbox.conf" with nano. nano /etc/modules-load.d/virtualbox.conf and write the following lines ...


1

There is a related question on askubuntu that links to a list of all these keyboard layouts.


0

I find. We must modify X keyboard layout. XKB in Xorg wiki An Unreliable Guide to XKB Configuration custom keyboard layout


-1

https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=529043 says no. There is no "clean" solution using only X. However, it is hinted this is possible with X and Xephyr. https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=79620 has further information on this, but I didn't try it, so I won't copy the contents as a solution.


2

I don't think you can reattach if the application has already been started in X. But maybe the following questions help? xpra Detach/reattach an application run on X over SSH? GNU Screen for X11 Forwarding Also, VNC could be a solution for you. But all these applications require that you restart the gui application on Server1


1

Though the question is not clear, let's clarify that in the answer, with various ways to list fonts. You can have server-side fonts (deprecated) and client-side fonts. The list of available server-side fonts can be obtained with the xlsfonts utility. Concerning client-side fonts, this depends on the client. Such fonts are generally managed with fontconfig, ...


2

It works if you create two files, one wrapper script being called by udev, which in turns calls the actual configuration script in the background. The configuration script needs to sleep for a short while, so that X11 has time to do its job. Here's the setup I use: Wrapper script called by udev (/usr/local/bin/setupwacom.sh): #!/usr/bin/env bash ...


0

In the options there is an example generated by X11: Option "XkbOptions" "lv3:ralt_switch,compose:caps" As we can see it is separated by commas and no spaces. Also the option is a command a colon and a key. Again, no spaces. This comes from this file: /etc/X11/xorg.conf and was setup that way as I was installing Ubuntu.


0

I found a solution. I have 3 linux systems on my drive. Manjaro, Ubuntu, Debian. I added the same xorg.conf to each one of them and the same thing happens - Gamma adjustment stays for few seconds after boot then gets reset to nothing. However all of the above is irrelevant as whenever I open nvidia-settings it loads in "nvidia-settings-rc" from the home ...


1

The solution I found was to run the following: sudo sed -i \ 's/allowed_users=console/allowed_users=anybody/' /etc/X11/Xwrapper.config Note, that in your situation, the console may be root or another, based on your particular initial configuration*


1

You were on the right track. This has indeed something to do with KMS. For video drivers that supports KMS X can be set up to run as a non-root user. You can check if your X is run as a non-root user in the way: How to determine if X server runs with root privileges. To strengthen my point, I quote directly from the Arch Linux homepage: "xorg-server 1.16 is ...


3

The "stuff" between the values seems a visual representation of the newline character to me ( octal character code 12), which you would get when using: echo -e 'a\012b' What you could try is pipe the output through tr '\n' ' ' as with: echo -e 'a\012b' | tr '\n' ' '


0

Check this out, I followed the steps and got 2 users, one on each screen. But I couldn't manage to have accelerated graphics on my intel vga. I used lightdm as desktop manager. gdm3 does not have many options and gdm is unfortunately obsolete. http://blog.startupanywhere.org/hardware-accelerated-nvidia-and-intel-graphics-together-in-debian/


0

I managed to solve this problem by using Xorg configuration files generated with localectl. I use a dvorak/qwerty layout with capslock as an extra control key. I previously had this in my .xinitrc: setxkbmap -layout us,us -variant dvorak, \ -option 'grp:alt_space_toggle' \ -option 'grp_led:caps' \ -option 'ctrl:nocaps' To get the equivalent setup in an ...


7

If you look at the Wikipedia page on the subject there are several apps mentioned. Xmove excerpt xmove is a computer program that allows the movement of X Window System applications between different displays and the persistence of X applications across X server restarts.[4] It solves a problem in the design of X, where an X client (an X ...


0

Try connecting to your machine from another one via ssh and monitor the whole process of starting the application remotely - watch resources like CPU, memory, swap and all appropriate logs (including the kernel ring buffer). htop and watch are your friends. You might even be able to change to local terminal from the ssh connection by using chvt. Run the ...


0

Have you tried right or left-clicking on the black screen? Some WindowManagers doesn't leave much evidence that they're running... You may even have started a WM that doesn't use the mouse but keyboard-commands (like ratpoison). Try running ps to see what WM you're running. Try starting X with xinit - this usually gives you a terminal-window (xterm) on a ...


0

Lubuntu 14.04: Start -> Preferences -> Additional Drivers Wait for the additional drivers to be located Check the circle labeled "Using x86 virtualization solution - guest addition module source for dkms..." Click Apply Changes Wait for the changes to be applied Click Close. Restart. You may need to restart twice. You should now be able to change ...


4

Method #1 - Using xwd You could just use the command line tool xwd to grab the X displays like so: $ xwd -display :1 -root -out 1.xwd You could loop through 1 to 4 like so: $ for i in {1..4};do xwd -display :$i -root $i.xwd; done NOTE: The resulting .xwd files are a special type of X Windows dump file. $ file 1.xwd 1.xwd: XWD X Window Dump image ...


1

I understand the problem in the question as follows: You are on a text console tty, so there is no X running on the tty where you are running the screenshot command. You can run command line screenshot commands for the X displays. You have specified the X displays for the screenshot commands, like in DISPLAY=:2 scrot out.png. The screen shot command does ...


0

As hinted here, I installed imwheel, then created ~/.imwheelrc with the following content. ".*" Shift_L, Up, Left Shift_L, Down, Right I then ran imwheel -b 45 in the terminal. I tested, and I haven't noticed the diagonal problems associated with high scrolling and xbindkeys. N.B. -b 45 restricts imwheel to capture only up and down scrolling, preventing ...


0

In any event, aside from properly setting the DISPLAY variable, using the ssh -X (or -Y) switch...are you sure that host is properly allowed to display remote material? Make sure the remote hosts is authorized to send information to your display using the xhost command.


0

ssh has its own X forwarding feature as well. Maybe it needs to be set up in the sshd.conf, with the X11Forwarding On directive. In this case, you will have a preset DISPLAY environment variable, with that DISPLAY called X11 programs will be forwarded through your ssh cobnection and it will be encrypted. Next to that, you will be able to get X apps behind a ...


0

You need a running X server on your remote machine, and know what display it is configured to, I.e. DISPLAY=localhost:1 Do ssh into your server, export the display variable export DISPLAY=localhost:1 Then start your GUI.


1

Yes, an X program uses the DISPLAY environment variable to find out where it should send the display. When using SSH, your DISPLAY environment may be automatically set up to forward the DISPLAY back through the ssh connection to your client machine (you can check with echo $DISPLAY). If you are not running an X server on your local machine, your remote ...



Top 50 recent answers are included