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I face the same issue. The magic trick is in the order of the keys. You have to: press and hold Ctrl press and release Shift release Ctrl If you release the Ctrl before Shift, or use any other order, you will face the issue. Pressing those keys together at the same time makes the order random. BTW. It doesn't depend on the WM at all. It seems to be ...


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Found the permanent way after a long night up with lots of half baked solutions. # backup your symbols file sudo cp /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/us{,.distribution} Add the following line in the xkb_symbols "basic" { section. do not worry if that second line is not there, it is only there for some languages and was not there for us on my system. ... ...


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If you use a privative graphical driver, probably you must stop and start the service gdm3, cause it will be failed at the start with restart command.


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Copied from Ji m's Ubuntu handbook: Open your file browser and navigate to “Computer-> sys -> class -> backlight” directory. You’ll see two or three folders there: !enter image description here In each folder there’s a file called actual_brightness, you can see its content (brightness value) through the thumbnail icon. !enter image ...


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It depends on what is the output of your xrandr when both monitors are connected. If it is for example something like this: $ xrandr Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1400 x 1050, maximum 1400 x 1400 VGA disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) LVDS connected 1400x1050+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 286mm x 214mm ...


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RandR may fit your needs. You want to have a look at the --rotate option: xrandr --output LVDS --rotate left You can ask for output devices using xrandr -q.


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Ok, after a sleepless night of googling and trying things out (like reinstalling unity and the x drivers), I decided to try out Intel's approach. Apparently they officially support linux and they have a graphics driver installer (link below). After downloading and installing everything started working again. I'm in Ubuntu heaven again. Enjoy! ...


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You can use the setleds command to change the keyboard leds. setleds -num -caps -scroll You'll need to run this from a script executed during shutdown. How to do this depends on what init system your system uses. With a traditional SysVinit or a system that supports emulation of its scripts, if you have directories called /etc/init/init.d or /etc/init.d, ...



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