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5

You should be able to use xrandr to turn off a given display. $ xrandr --output CRT1 --off To re-enable it: $ xrandr --output CRT1 --auto You can see the names of your output displays using xrandr -q: $ xrandr -q Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1440 x 900, maximum 8192 x 8192 LVDS1 connected primary 1440x900+0+0 (normal left inverted right x ...


4

Turns out the was fallout of an attempt to get coordinate scaling working better with external monitors. That was trying to fix to pointer speed changing if adding an external monitor changes the aspect ratio. It, however, apparently didn't work with a at least some devices and caused this bug.ยน Thus, they reverted the change, especially since it turned out ...


3

A pretty quick search would likely yield xev as a result. It will not show you everything that is pressed or typed in X ever. But rather, will allow you to see information about keycodes and mouse movements. However, with the -root option, you might be able to get xev to monitor the whole X session. Note, if you do this, you'll make it pretty difficult to ...


3

You can place the copy of the .Xauthority file wherever you want and then: export XAUTHORITY=/path/to/.Xauthority Then any programs launched which try to connect to X will use that Xauthority file.


3

A quick check of the source code of the current version, xautolock 2.2, shows that it doesn't support this feature, although it wouldn't be too hard to implement it yourself if you know a little bit about C and how to write X programs. The reason is probably this: whenever you want to know the status of xautolock, you also know what status you would like it ...


3

There are a few ways to output the user ID (UID) with ps; a simple one is with -f: ps -fC X Will give you information for all the X servers that are running (there can be more than one). This presumes that the executable is called X -- if there's no such process, you will have to target something else. Since it almost certainly at least has capital X in ...


2

fgconsole (if run as root) should do what you want. Ctrl-Alt-Fx switches to the Linux console #x, and fgconsole tells you the number of the currently active console.


2

You can use xrandr. I have tested this breathy on a single monitor. First look at current resolution and subtract 228 from X. Replace X and Y below for new resolutions Y=y, X=x-228. (note in the text below lower case x is a literal x). Run xrandr to get output name. Then xrandr --fb XxY --output OUTPUT_NAME --transform 1,0,-228,0,1,0,0,0,1


2

In /etc/default/grub I changed this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text nomodeset acpi_backlight=legacy" to: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text nomodeset" update-grub, reboot, and start mdm by hand: /etc/init.d/mdm start No idea why the backlight should suddenly break.


2

On Debian 7: install and use tightvncserver or vnc4server. You probably have similar packages on your system (maybe without the 4). type apt-cache search vnc | grep -v lib | grep server on any debian based system (including Ubuntu, mint, elementary). X11vnc is the vnc server that connects to an existing X11 server, useful for tech support to help a user ...


2

You can use the functionality built into most media players to manage this; it works efectively with xautolock and it's lockers. mpv and mplayer both have a screensaver options: --stop-screensaver, --no-stop-screensaver Turns off the screensaver (or screen blanker and similar mechanisms) at startup and turns it on again on exit (default: yes). The ...


2

There is a bug in Xfce that always sets the left most monitor or the upper monitor to the primary monitor, if you reconfigure the monitors with xrandr. So you have to either move the panels and etc by hand, or move the monitor to the right.


1

Changing only MaxSpeed is not enough. I've changed MinSpeed from 1 to 20 and MaxSpeed from 1.75 to 40 and the touchpad is usable again.


1

I do have a dead pixel on my screen that can disappear by gently pressing the screen or by rebooting perhaps it is a dead pixel. Try to find if it is a dead pixel. You can set the screen to a lower resolution. If the spot is bigger the problem is a display bug. If the size didn't change, your screen has a "dead pixel" You can also boot another Linux ...



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