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7

On Ubuntu, some people have had luck doing this using Compiz Config Setting Manager. Run it and under Accessibility category, you'll find Color Filter and Opacity, Brightness and Saturation filters. There you'll be get the desired effect with the available options. You can try options related to Grayscale or decrease saturation to zero to get the black and ...


3

Besides InputClass there also exists a section called InputDevice which takes nearly the exact same options as InputClass. Of course you cannot use the Match* operators because but have to give the device's path explicitly: Section "InputClass" Identifier "touchpad" Driver "synaptics"   Option "Device" "/dev/input/event<X>" Option ...


3

You could do this with by configuring your keyboards separately. For example I use US English layout on my laptop keyboard and have a Sun Type 6 USB keyboard with german layout and I have the following in my /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/10-evdev.conf: # Default configuration for all keyboards not handled explicitly Section "InputClass" Identifier "evdev ...


3

I would take a look at this guide from the CrashPlan website titled: CONFIGURING A HEADLESS CLIENT. It spells out the details of how one would go about installing CrashPlan for use in a headless situation, which is really what you want. But I just want to disable the GUI If you're using a desktop environment such as GNOME you can launch the configuration ...


3

What makes you think X-related processes are still running? When you log in remotely xrdp (re-)connects you to your GUI environment. If you don't have one running already then xrdp-sesman will cause a GUI environment to get initialized. (If you want to prevent that you could sudo service xrdp stop although it will likely come back on re-boot unless you ...


2

I'd better answer my own question for future reference. After a bit of in-depth research, I found out that xmodmap is actually deprecated and is roughly patched over the xkb keyboard model. The xkb model doesn't use a linear array of alternatives, but splits layouts into groups, with each group having a couple of characters in different shift levels. The ...


2

The xrandr command is the one you are looking for. An example usage is: xrandr --output HDMI1 --auto --same-as LVDS1 You can have --left-of, --right-of. Run xrandr on its own to see the different outputs that are available.


2

Since @Bob says there's no runtime configuration option for this and I didn't want to rebuild gdm3 from patched source, I took the following approach. First, move the real X server aside: sudo dpkg-divert --local --rename --add /usr/bin/Xorg Then drop a new shell script in place of /usr/bin/Xorg: #!/bin/sh test -x /usr/local/bin/Xorg && exec ...


1

Depending on how you'd like to solve this I can think of one way which should "just work". I would create an application that runs when you login and add a shell script to this list that runs this particular command. This will enforce the running of this any time you login. #!/bin/bash xinput set-button-map "ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad" 1 3 2 4 5 Then add ...


1

Use xrand command without args for view your output names and the supported resolutions. Once you have this informations, you can setup a screen like this (this is an example, there is a lot of others options): xrand --output <output> --mode <resolution> --right-of/--left-of <output> You can also just reactivate your screen with: xrand ...


1

Martin- Very similar setup on my end, except with a pair of nvidia GT9800's - circa 2008!. Also an onboard Intel HD4000 (disabled in bios). xrandr only showed 1 gpu, though all other sys related tools properly reported both. ubuntu 14.04 lts beta 2, nvidia 331.28 proprietary The holy grail fix for me last night was: Base Mosaic! Empty xorg.conf, nvidia x ...


1

Sounds like you're missing the video driver and X is defaulting to a generic video driver. For example, if your video card is an AMD, you need the radeon XF86 video drivers, and if you're running inside a virtual machine you need the vmware or virtualbox drivers. These drivers are part of X, and to put an example, in Debian they appear on the package manager ...



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