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To find out which app/program grabbed your key use the debug keysym XF86LogGrabInfo. Use xdotool to press keys + XF86LogGrabInfo at the same time e.g. in a terminal run KEY=XF86AudioPlay xdotool keydown ${KEY}; xdotool key XF86LogGrabInfo; xdotool keyup ${KEY} Then check for output with tail /var/log/Xorg.0.log Note that with gnome 3/gdm and systemd this ...


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1) u can use the Network-manager or wicd but not the 2 at same time apt-get remove wicd 2)find the network device lspci -nn | grep -i network 3)verify the kernel module lspci -k | grep -i network -A 2 the ouput is somthing like 02:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4313 802.11b/g/n Wireless LAN Controller (rev 01) Subsystem: ...


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It sends different stop signals to a process. Here's some info: Stop: SIGSTOP - This signal makes the operating system pause a process's execution. The process cannot ignore the signal. Kill: SIGKILL - The SIGKILL signal forces the process to stop executing immediately. The program cannot ignore this signal. This process does not get to clean-up either. ...


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Use the source: switch (xtm_signal) { case XTM_SIGNAL_TERMINATE: sig = SIGTERM; break; case XTM_SIGNAL_STOP: sig = SIGSTOP; break; case XTM_SIGNAL_CONTINUE: sig = SIGCONT; break; case XTM_SIGNAL_KILL: sig = SIGKILL; break; default: return TRUE; } You can see that ...



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