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9

Here, in Xfce4 Settings Manager or launch xfce4-settings-manager from terminal, In Window Manager configuration, find the keyboard part, look for Window operations menu, and then hit on Clear button, which will remove that shortcut key, effects immedately


8

Have a look at the file $HOME/.local/share/applications/defaults.list There is a section [Default Applications] to specify the programs for particular mime types. You can add for example: application/x-debian-package=gdebi.desktop The .desktop files can be found in /usr/share/applications/ or you can create your own files under ...


7

You can use the technique described on this page: http://fvue.nl/wiki/Debian_4.0:_Installing_gpg-agent Here's the gist: Install gpg-agent and pinentry program: sudo apt-get install gnupg-agent pinentry-curses Add the lines below to ~/.profile. Any POSIX-confirming shell should include this file. # Invoke GnuPG-Agent the first time we login. # Does ...


7

I think you might want to turn off "Sync Selections" in the Clipman options. See the Clipman Documentation, specifically the distinction between the "primary" and "default" clipboards and the general settings section


7

I can only reproduce this if I enable "Sync Selections" in Clipman. NOTE: Make sure "Sync selections" is unchecked and you should be fine.                            For more background on the multiple clipboards, see: For ...


6

killall xfce4-panel, then save the session to prevent xfce4-panel from starting again. EDIT: A 'cleaner' way would be to create a ~/.xinitrc and start everything maunally(ie: xfwm4, xfsettingsd, etc). startxfce4 starts xfce's sessions manager which in turn, starts all that stuff like xfce4-panel that you don't want. You could also edit ...


5

I had that problem too some months ago, and I remember I had to delete some .desktop files that were inside the $HOME/.local/share/applications folder. I think you should delete any file that has notepad as part of its name, and also you should try to delete (or move somewhere else) the files wine-extension-*.


5

xscreensaver has a -watch option: -watch    Prints a line each time the screensaver changes state: when the screen blanks, locks, unblanks, or when the running hack is changed. This option never returns; it is intended for use by shell scripts that want to react to the screensaver in some way.1 The UNBLANK state is what you are looking for. ...


5

Dropbox is integrated with Nautilus, however, there is a hack from the Crunchbang Wiki that works around this. Create a script, /bin/nautilus: #!/bin/bash exec thunar ~/Dropbox exit 0 so that dropbox's requests for a file manager are passed to Thunar. There is also a plugin, Thunar Dropbox that provides the context menus for dropbox in Thunar (Copy Public ...


4

You need to have editable keyboard accelerators turned on as documented under "How do I assign different keyboard shortcuts?" on this page*. Then hover over menu Go->Open Parent and press backspace twice. That should add this line: (gtk_accel_path "<Actions>/ThunarWindow/open-parent" "BackSpace") to your ~/.config/Thunar/accels.scm *This setting ...


4

The password you use for sudo is your password. The administrative password is the password of the user root. If you forgot it, set it up again: % sudo su - [sudo] password for *your user*: *enter pwd for your user* # passwd *enter new password for user root* # ^D


4

You may be looking for the desktop margins setting. For example, I set a margin1 so that my conky is always visible and not covered by maximized windows. You could do the same as long as you always place your always-on-top along the edge of the screen. 1 I don't actually use xfwm but the margin concept is the same.


4

Check in Settings > Preferred Applications, under the utilities tab to see exactly which terminal program is being run by exo-open. I suspect that it's gnome-terminal, for which this is a known bug. The fix landed pretty recently, so maybe it's not in your distribution (even though Mint 12 just came out). Alternately, maybe the fix doesn't completely ...


4

The right way to do this would be to find the config file that is changed, and edit it to the correct resolution. But I'm not an XFCE user so you'll have to look for this yourself :) Another, desktop-agnostic way is to change the resolution using xrandr. Assuming you can still boot up your computer and use Ctrl+Alt+F1 to access a command prompt, you can ...


4

My trash works on xfce and here's what my directory structure looks like in ~/.local/share which is the only place I have located a Trash folder: drwx------ 4 myuser myuser 4096 Jun 18 10:12 Trash drwx------ 3 myuser myuser 4096 Jun 18 10:12 files drwx------ 2 myuser myuser 4096 Jun 18 10:12 info Based on this... mkdir ~/.local/share/Trash mkdir ...


4

This question is answered in Xfce wiki, subsection Some of my applications are always started when I login: There are two possible reasons why the application is started: It is saved in the last session or it is listed in the auto started applications. Follow 1 of the two steps below to get rid of the applications. Start the ...


4

In my experience, the simplest way to transfer environment settings is to copy the user configuration directories wholesale, renaming the existing directories first. In the case of XFCE, that would be ~/.config/xfce4. There may also be necessary files in ~/.local. Be sure to install any requisite software before copying the configuration.


4

From the conky man page. cpu (cpuN) CPU usage in percents. For SMP machines, the CPU number can be provided as an argument. ${cpu cpu0} is the total usage, and ${cpu cpuX} (X >= 1) are individual CPUs. freq_g (n) Returns CPU #n's frequency in GHz. CPUs are counted from 1. If omitted, the parameter defaults to 1. You most likely have ...


4

First a couple of terms which will help you to understand this issue in particular and other things in general WRT a linux GUI: Window Manager (WM) Desktop Environment (DE) Someone should really write a simple, canonical explanation of these in a linux context...anyway, the base windowing system generally used on *nix systems (including linux) is the ...


4

I found these methods on Ubuntu Forums in a thread titled: Thread: How do I lock the screen in XFCE?. excerpted from 2 of the answers in that thread Method #1 - Keyboard shortcut Open the settings manager > keyboard > shortcuts and you can see that the default shortcut to lock the screen is ctrl-alt-del. If you want to change it, click add on the left, ...


4

Follow these steps to reset the XFCE panel, and please note that instead of permanently deleting those files which are deleted in the following steps, you can also just move them to a different place. First quit the panel: xfce4-panel --quit Kill the XFCE notification daemon, xfconfd: pkill xfconfd Delete the panel settings: rm -rf ...


3

I finally found a solution by myself. Reading here and there I found some promessing xml files in the /etc/xdg/menus directory. From there I copied the xfce-applications.menu file to ~/.config/xfce4/desktop/menu.xml and edited the main application menu in my desktop to take its entries from that file (right clicked on the main menu -> Properties -> Use ...


3

This should restore the menu to your panel: Right Click on your panel Select Add New items from the pull up list Scroll down to the bottom of the resultant dialog Click on Xfce Menu Click on the Add Button and, as per the link provided by Philomath, you can elect to change the title to "Applications."


3

I Googled/emailed around a bit and got these two commands. To lock the screen: xflock4 To activate user switching: gdmflexiserver For Lightdm, this file resides in a strange spot (at least on Arch Linux): /usr/lib/lightdm/lightdm/gdmflexiserver I merged these two into XFCE's logout button dialog, in case anyone's interested, so the patch is ...


3

It's possible to display multiple timezones by using multiple applets of the Orage Clock Panel. Under Orage properties (right click on the clock -> properties) there is a button next to 'set timezone to:' labeled Open. Clicking that button will bring up a window that allows you to select which timezone you want that applet to use. Each applet will use the ...


3

On Debian you can either install the ntp package, which will run a daemon that automatically keeps your clock synced, or the ntpdate package which provides a command to run manually to sync the clock. Personally I run the ntp daemon so I never have to worry about it. Simply installing the package should be enough to get it started and syncing your clock ...


3

better format: (sry 4 double answer) go to settings> setting editor click on xfwm4 in 'chanel side bar click on general to display tree list and find one called 'mouesewheel_rollup' click on to highlight and click edit icon at top of window its a Bool so all you need to do is uncheck enable box. save from: ...


3

Have a look at the HIDDEN CUSTOMIZATIONS mentioned in xfdesktop's README: If you're using the icon view, and would like to change how the text looks, you have three things you can change: the opacity (transparency) of the rounded text background, the color of the rounded text background, and the color of the text itself. You'd want to add ...


3

There's a bug report, apparently application icon loading is the culprit (apart from building the application menu). This comment indicates that deselecting "show application icons in menu" should make it faster. If you don't want to do this, there's also a patch, which according to the numbers Before patch with Icons elapsed: 0.129740 elapsed: 0.143799 ...


3

You could install and run Devil's Pie. I use it for controlling window positioning, which workspaces to open in, decoration, and many other features. Here's a great documentation for how to use it: Devil's Pie documentation Also, an example to make gkrellm show on all workspaces, on top, in the top left corner: (if (is (application_name) "gkrellm") ...



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