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1

It's impossible to define such a shortcut unless the application supports it. The notion of selected text is entirely within the application, there's no way to access it from the outside, and there's no way to ask the application for the selected text (except by using some application-specific protocol). Many applications automatically copy the selected ...


0

I'm not aware of any secondary clipboard (other than having Clipman running — I use Xfce4). What I often do is select text and paste with the middle-click mouse button. Whenever I need two simultaneous (and convenient) copy/paste paths I select some text, either with the keyboard or mouse, press Ctrl + C, select some other text then use the middle click ...


0

As I understand it, you have to go through two levels of mapping. In the keycodes mapping you give "arbitrary" names (up to 4 chars inside <>) to the numeric scan-codes generated by the keyboard, then in the symbols mapping you say how that key name acts. So you need to have <ESC> = 9; <ESC2> = 180; then an xkb_symbols entry of key ...


1

If running the client in verbose mode (ssh -v user@host) gives you debug1: Remote: No xauth program; cannot forward with spoofing. but xauth is indeed installed on the server, then it is probably because sshd looks for xauth executable in wrong location (/usr/X11R6/bin/xauth usually). One can fix that by setting XAuthLocation /usr/bin/xauth in ...


4

You can disable X for a specific command line invocation by prefixing the command line with DISPLAY=: DISPLAY= gpg -d img0424.png.gpg That should give you the curses based pinentry interface instead of the GUI. But it is probably more efficient to download all the files with scp. The data volume transferred when displaying over X is likely to be more than ...


1

According to An Unreliable Guide to XKB Configuration, you can do this with an alias. That feature is used in xkb/aliases, so you should be able to do something like alias <ESC> = 9; alias <ESC> = 180;


3

The xterm manual shows an option which may help (added in patch #298 in 2013): -report-fonts Print a report to the standard output showing information about fonts which are loaded. This corresponds to the reportFonts resource. Also, appres is useful for showing what resources are used, e.g., ...


2

For occational use you could plug xtrace between your client and your server and make the client not see any extensions by using xtrace's -e switch: -e | --denyextensions Modify all server replies to say there are no extensions available. (As xtrace does supports only a small number of extensions anyway and calls all extended ...


0

I needed to add a dash when switching users in the console. So su - $ALTUSER instead of su $ALTUSER. The dash - is an alias for the -login option of su.


3

There are 2 sorts of hostname entries managed by xauth, local names such as myhost/unix:0 and remote names such as remote:0. The latter are held as ip addresses, but I imagine you are referring to the local names. The hostname part of these are not actually of any significance to X11, but can be used by the xdm tools to distinguish between several local ...


0

You can try using an VNC server like Xvnc, TightVNC or TigerVNC. You can also use VirtualBox (at least version 5), install an operating system and your program in a virtual machine. If you start your VM in "detachable" mode, you can close all VirtualBox windows and keep the VM running. You can then restart the VirtualBox GUI and reattach to the VM.


1

OK, I figured out that I have to jump to another tty screen on the box, login, and issue startx from there.


0

I had exactly the same problem. I prefer to use TWM as it is lean and light. The Linux Mint box is my home server, and rarely needs gui tools anyway. Nearly everything I do on it is command line stuff - lots of scripts running. Here is what I did: sudo apt-get install xterm edit ~/.vnc/xstartup to use xterm. #!/bin/sh exec /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc [ ...


2

Short: probably not. Applications on a X Window desktop read key symbols and interpret them on an application-specific basis. There are conventions for the key symbols (which a particular set of programs may follow), but nothing that enforces them globally.


7

There really isn't any such command. Nor can there (within reason) be. The user could be, for example, using a full-screen app, and his/her compositing window manager refuses to put anything on top of it (as it'd disrupt the full-screen experience). And of course blindly typing doesn't work—a terminal might not be focused. You could wind up typing your ...


2

An XTerm's size is determined by the number of characters its displaying, the font it is using, and the size of the window manager decorations (title bar, outlines, etc.). You're probably using a different (larger) font on LFS. Ubuntu's xterm settings are probably in /etc/X11/app-defaults/{XTerm,XTerm-color} (at least that's where they are in Debian). You ...


2

This looks like a kernel bug, please report it, then try a newer linux-image-amd64 package from the official backports repository. If that still exhibits the problem, try an upstream kernel as explained in 1.


1

You can test this without the rest of pymouse by firing up python and running from Xlib.display import Display display = Display() display.record_create_context which should print <bound method Display.create_context of <Xlib.display.Display instance at ...>> Looks like that corresponds to $ xdpyinfo | grep -i record RECORD (that's ...


2

What you're asking is probably doable if you can determine the window-id's involved and use wmctrl to ask the window manager to do the moving and stacking operations on your behalf. That is, your terminal program would start the image viewer it would obtain the window-id of the image viewer using that information, it would ask the window manager to move ...


1

It turned out to be a configuration issue. Moving the ~/.ddd directory so that ddd used a fresh configuration, solved the problem. That explains why it worked with sudo, as it was executed as the root user which did not have a messed up configuration. Something worth mentioning is that my interpretation of the strace output was also not correct. It is ...


0

I had the same problem.And I solved this problem accidently. The answer is simple: pacman -Syu


3

Like many words, “X11” can have multiple meanings. “X11” is, strictly speaking, a communication protocol. In the sentences “X primarily defines protocol and graphics primitives …” and “X does not mandate the user interface …”, that's what X refers to. X is a family of protocols, X11 is the 11th version and the only one that's been in use in the last 25 ...


1

I found out how to do it. I don't know why I didn't think of it before. First; ssh -X account@lab-a-computer then; ssh -X my-account@my-lab-computer ~/idea-IC/bin/idea.sh brings the gui to my laptop screen.


0

I have always used X2go: http://wiki.x2go.org/doku.php And the X2go client on my computer.... The wiki I linked should get you started and there is plenty on the web about setting up for particular distros since you did not mention one in your question. Note I belevie you will need root privileges to install.


3

notify-send is simple, all you need to do is call it from your bash script like this notify-send 'some title' 'some message' You'll get nice little notification pupup on KDE.


0

X11, aka X.org Foundation Windowing is basically used by other desktop environments like KDE and GNOME, among many others, to provide the abstract interface to managing a GUI. Without relying on X, KDE/GNOME/others would have to write the code to do low-level coding things themselves. Instead, KDE/GNOME communicate back and forth with X (it runs as a server ...


2

The short version is that X11 and VNC serve different purposes, so you'd use them in different circumstances. It is possible to open a full X11 desktop remotely, using XDMCP; this is how old X11 terminals work (a central system provides the desktops and hosts all the applications, the terminals only display them). But as far as I'm aware you can't connect ...


0

Use either Devil's Pie or Devilspie2 to remove the window decoration. Both have been tested and will likely work for any GTK+ and Qt applications. Using Devil's Pie Use a text editor to type the following code. (if (is (application_name) "VLC media player") (undecorate)) Save as any filename with .ds file extension at $HOME/.devilspie. Run devilspie in ...


1

The document you're reading is from the last century. I don't remember any system I've used this century that didn't use cookies (described in §8 of the document). With cookies, the first thing an application needs to do when it connects to the X server is to present the “cookie”, which is a password that's randomly generated when the server starts and ...


1

You can ask the X server to use only 8-bit depth. In your /etc/X11/xorg.conf file: Section "Screen" Identifier "Screen0" DefaultDepth 8 EndSection


2

Just find another theme with a bigger close button here http://box-look.org/?xcontentmode=7402 If you intend to keep the current theme, you must replace those three icons by hand, enlarge it. You should find your current theme in ~/.themes/NAME/openbox/ The rc.xml is irreverent from this.


1

If you only want to change the DPI within i3, you could put the command in your i3 config file with the line: exec xrandr --dpi 220 Depending on your distro you will find the config file in different places but often under ~/.config/i3/config


0

Actually, there does not seem to be any standard way of doing. There is a most obvious solution: from within the network namespace, start an ssh server, then connect to it from any remote machine with the usual option, ssh -Y me@network.namespace.IP.address then any graphical program can be started on the remote machine's X11 server. All sorts of ...



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