Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In the end I restarted the system prior to checking xkill. Shame on me, as 'xkill' seemed a more interesting solution. Tried to replicate few times since, but no avail.


1

I don't think the OpenBSD console supports fonts for multibyte encodings. In principle it might be possible to support them in relation to the recent drm(4) code, but I don't think anybody is working on that. You might want to ask on an OpenBSD list for an authoritative answer.


1

I just ran into this problem connecting to a headless RHEL7 server. You need the xorg-x11-xauth package installed on your host in order for the DISPLAY variable to get set, and to be properly authorized. Hope I saved somebody some time.


2

I wrote a tool which returns the plain application name (e.g. 'Terminal', 'gedit' or 'SmartGit' which are the ones I tested). Most code is shamelessly stolen from @Harvey here. // gcc clipboard-owner.c -lX11 -o clipboard-owner #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <X11/Xlib.h> #include ...


1

Shared memory is a mechanism to exchange rendered image without having to use sockets, the protocol works something like this: X client create the shared buffer, X client tell the server that's where you will find the images i create, the server "attach" itself to the shared memory and refresh whenever there is an update, this mechanism is 10x of socket ...


1

Indeed, Graphics.X11.ExtraTypes.XF86 does not appear to provide an XF86XK_AudioMicMute KeySym. Either this was an oversight (maybe the MicMute key keysym was added after the Haskell module was written) or an intentional decision (perhaps because the Mic Mute key is so uncommon). Either way, luckily, there is a way to bind keys in Haskell without a KeySym: ...


0

Let's try simplifying this a little. I'm not aware of any symbols command keys.type=MULTI, so I removed that line first. I saved your file as keys (minus that line) and ran xkbcomp -w 10 keys. It reports: Warning: No automatic type for 6 symbols Using for the <TLDE> key (keycode 49) Warning: Type "" is not ...


0

This was a result of one of its dependencies: font-config, which sets the default font for many things.


0

Adding this line to /etc/ssh/sshd_config fixed it for me: X11UseLocalhost yes


1

Every Firefox user is associated with a profile. This profile basically contains all the preferences, history, bookmarks etc. When Firefox starts, it puts a lock on the profile. This ensures that no other Firefox process uses this profile. But, this doesn't mean that there can be only one instance of Firefox. It just means there can be only one instance of ...


1

Not sure if this is some bug related to wine in combination with some or all window managers... But I finally found one working solution for my needs: startx <(echo ssh -X myRemoteLinuxIP wine notepad) which runs wine application as single-app without window manager. And keyboard is finally routed inside the program.


2

Your second problem seems to be an issue with tmux and the evaluation of certain AppleScripts through osascript. There's a wrapper you can install which should fix the problem. You'll want to install reattach-to-user-namespace through Homebrew or MacPorts and wrap the call to osascript: reattach-to-user-namespace osascript -e 'display notification "Hello, ...


0

The only two options I am aware of that may work are vnc and vpn. with a vpn you would appear to have a static IP address. With vnc your state would be preserved. ssh tunneling would hide ip address issues from X11 but it would still not survive a ip address change. The only reputable advice I have seen regarding changing IP addresses with X11 is don't.


1

I figured out that xmodmap was the correct solution here. In the .Xmodmap file, turn off shift, then add right shift as mode switch and add left shift as shift: clear Shift keysym Shift_R = Mode_switch add Shift = Shift_L Now the order of the first few keysym columns is key, left_shift+key, right_shift+key. So for my parentheses example: keycode 18 = 9 ...


1

Which distribution and package manager? Most of them have a history/undo which will allow you to recover the removed packages or at least see a list of what you removed. For yum that would be: to see a list of entries in the history: $ sudo yum history to see the action that took place in an entry: $ sudo yum history info 33 to undo these actions: $ ...


0

Disable autocomplete/autosuggestion.  (We had to destroy the village in order to save it.) Access "translate.google" via a bookmark, so you don't have to type into the location bar.


0

You need to grant access to X server for other users /usr/bin/xhost + You can read about xhost in man page: XHOST(1) NAME xhost - server access control program for X ... ... ... + Access is granted to everyone, even if they aren't on the list (i.e., access control is turned off). ... ... ...


0

Reverse tunnel method You can SSH from A to B but you want to SSH from B to A? A generic solution is to create a reverse SSH tunnel. From SERVER: ssh -f -N -R 4222:localhost:22 CLIENT Now you can SSH to port 4222 on CLIENT and log into the server. Turn on X11 forwarding on that connection. ssh -p 4222 -X localhost Manual setup method Alternatively, ...


4

When you run ssh -X remotehost and you get DISPLAY=localhost:10 presented to the remote host. ssh listens on that port and forwards traffic back to the calling system, using its original value of DISPLAY to determine the server address. It's probable that on your local system you've got DISPLAY=:0. Or if you haven't, that's what it's being defaulted as. ...


2

Have you set DISPLAY environment variable on the client? I'm not sure which shell you are using, but with Bourne shell derivative (like bash), please try: export DISPLAY=127.0.0.1:0 ssh -X marko@vm Or if you're using cmd.exe: set DISPLAY=127.0.0.1:0 ssh -X marko@vm


0

As long as I found the proper solution, I will answer my own question. There is a program named keyfuzz that can change the keyboard maps used by the kernel, based on input devices - i.e. separately for every keyboard attached to the computer. There are two problems with this program that are not described properly in the documentation: The USB ...


0

Export a different display before trying to open an X11 connection: export DISPLAY=:1 Then launch your GUI and it should work.


0

Assuming you have ssh on the server (that is you can ssh out of the server just not to it), you can port forward from the server to your client. SERVER$ ssh -L6000:127.0.0.1:6000 CLIENT.ip.or.name This will forward the local 6000 port on the server through the ssh tunnel to the localhost port 6000.


3

There's no similar mechanism, because the reasons are completely different. A garbled text terminal comes from having multiple sources all writing to the terminal, with no coordination between them. So you end up with text where it doesn't belong, which is solved by making the application whose text you do want to see redisplay what it wants. xrefresh is ...


1

Don't run your tests on an X server that displays to your hardware. Run them in an X server that “displays” to a virtual framebuffer that's just a chunk of memory, such as Xvfb. Xvfb is commonly used for testing GUI applications such as web browsers. This won't work if your application needs to work closely with hardware features, e.g. because it needs 3D ...


0

This works well for me in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/20-thinkpad.conf: Section "InputClass" Identifier "Trackpoint Wheel Emulation" MatchProduct "TPPS/2 IBM TrackPoint|DualPoint Stick|Synaptics Inc. Composite TouchPad / TrackPoint|ThinkPad USB Keyboard with TrackPoint|USB Trackpoint pointing device|Composite TouchPad / TrackPoint" MatchDevicePath ...


1

xmodmap is the tool you want. No, it does not slow down anything at all. man xmodmap says: clear MODIFIERNAME This removes all entries in the modifier map for the given modifier, where valid name are: Shift, Lock, Control, Mod1, Mod2, Mod3, Mod4, and Mod5 (case does not matter in modifier names, although ...



Top 50 recent answers are included