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0

from the sshd manpage: If ~/.ssh/rc exists and the sshd_config(5) PermitUserRC option is set, runs it; else if /etc/ssh/sshrc exists, runs it; otherwise runs xauth. The “rc” files are given the X11 authentication protocol and cookie in standard input. See SSHRC, below.


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Make sure you have your correct driver defined in: /etc/X11/xorg.conf Driver "Your Driver"


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On my fairly up-to-date Arch laptop, /tmp/.X11-unix/ is a directory with one entry: X0, a Unix-domain socket. The X11 server (usuall Xorg these days) communicates with clients like xterm, firefox, etc via some kind of reliable stream of bytes. A Unix domain socket is probably a bit more secure than a TCP socket open to the world, and probably a bit faster, ...


6

The X server has several ways of communicating with X clients (apps). The most common one to use, at least on the same machine, is a Unix-domain socket. A Unix-domain socket is like the more familiar TCP ones, except that instead of connecting to an address and port, you connect to a path. You use an actual file (a socket file) to connect. The X server ...


5

For yanks, Vim supports setting both unnamed and unnamedplus: :set clipboard=unnamed,unnamedplus From :help clipboard-unnamedplus: When "unnamed" is also included to the option, yank operations (but not delete, change or put) will additionally copy the text into register '*'.


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Here are a couple of options for speeding up X11. Use compression with the -C flag (e.g. ssh -XC) Consider using blowfish or arcfour ciphers instead of the default AES (N.B. arcfour is less secure but over twice as fast AES-128/256-ctr/cbc). So you don't have to string all this out each time you can just drop it all in your ~/.ssh/config file like ...


1

systemd is not backwards compatible with System 5 init, only System 5 rc. You've switched from Debian 7 to the prospective Debian 8. This has, probably unbeknownst to you, switched your system management from (Linux) System 5 init+rc to systemd. systemd is the default init system, and that particular upgrade performs this switch. Linux System 5-style ...


3

My first thought was xsetroot but I think that the following Python snippet will do it better: import gtk import sys def create_window(): window = gtk.Window() window.set_default_size(200, 200) window.connect('destroy', gtk.main_quit) color = gtk.gdk.color_parse(str(sys.argv[1])) window.modify_bg(gtk.STATE_NORMAL, color) ...


0

OK, in the end I did get startx running without a display manager. It didn't help my boot time at all, but never mind. I followed the instructions in X without display manager at Gentoo wiki, creating the autologin service /etc/systemd/system/x11.service. [Unit] After=systemd-user-sessions.service [Service] ExecStart=/sbin/mingetty --autologin username ...


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If you're using Xorg.conf to set up your X Server, you can use that in order to set acceleration or deceleration. Just add something to the effect of: Section "InputDevice" Identifier "name" Driver "evdev" Option "ConstantDeceleration" "multiplier" EndSection where multiplier is how many times slower you want the mouse to go. 0.5 would double ...


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If you have SELINUX enforcing, and your home directory is not under the /home directory, that is your problem. Targeted SELINUX settings assume all user home directories are under /home, so xauth doesn't work correctly because the SELINUX type on your home directory is not correct. I wish I could recommend a fix, but the one I found did not work. I set ...


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Finaly I've found what was wrong. I didn't have polish language enabled in KDE's control panel. systemsettings -> input devices -> keyboards -> layouts


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clear lock clear control add control = Caps_Lock Control_L Control_R keycode 66 = Control_L Caps_Lock NoSymbol NoSymbol This will remap Caps_Lock to control and allow you to use Shift+Caps_Lock to trigger the normal behaviour of Caps_Lock


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X11 (classic) Run the program xev from a terminal to see the keycode sent by the CapsLock key. That's the number just after keycode on the third line from the KeyPress event line corresponding to pressing the key. On a PC, the keycode is 66. Create a file called .Xmodmap in your home directory and add the line keycode 66 = Mode_switch clear Lock ...


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Try sudo rm /var/lib/xkb/*.xkm This clears a sort of cache of keyboard layouts. I had similar problems in the past when using custom keyboard layauts and this solved the issue.


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The problem is solved, we had changed the extension of sshd.config to sshd.config.txt. This did not have an effect until I did the unload/load command. This is why I blamed the unload/uload function. Changed the name back to normal, restarted the ssh service and now it works.


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As others have mentioned it's likely to a specific service or process, which you should be able to kill. You can start gnome-system-monitor as root to see all of the processes on the system and their CPU load. Instead of rebooting next time try a few things: Use the CTRL+ALT+F1 through F7 to switch to another terminal. This will cause your X graphics ...


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IMO, You need to identify the service which you want to restart(use "top" command for the same). You will have to be cautious while choosing a service to restart. For an ex: top will also list "firefox" so you should refrain from killing it as you do not want to close it.


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You only have the permission to start an X session with startx if you're logged in on a console. Remote users (for example) don't get this permission. When you run /bin/su -c /usr/bin/startx -l bateman from /etc/inittab, you don't get a console so starting the X server fails. The normal way to get a GUI at run time is to run a display manager. A display ...


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It isn't an exact answer, but have you tried pressing fn+delete? This should act as a real Delete, vs its actual action of 'backspace' and is very near to the power key. Another tip: fn+enter acts as an Insert button, so you should be able to press shift+fn+enter and Paste like a middle click.


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Convert the image using Imagemagick's convert and pipe the result to feh to diplay it as background, which also works for transparent terminals: convert "$file" -resize 1600x1200 png:- | feh --bg-center - Of course convert can do almost anything to your image. Much more than any background setter ever will.


1

Here there is my own solution, I have modified a little my old tutorial on my website linked on this page: this code will try to download my master repository on github link="https://github.com/nowardev/kde-peace-settings/archive/master.zip" #my own github stuff a=$(kdialog --progressbar "W-Get will download: Nowardev GitHub Master stuff " ...


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DISPLAY=:0 gnome-panel is a shell command that runs the external command gnome-panel with the environment variable DISPLAY set to :0. The shell syntax VARIABLE=VALUE COMMAND sets the environment variable VARIABLE for the duration of the specified command only. It is roughly equivalent to (export VARIABLE=VALUE; exec COMMAND). The environment variable ...


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It's an environment variable that is passed just to that program, rather than the shell as a whole. This happens when you set a variable on the same line as a command. X11 programs need to know where to display windows, since it's a client/server system and you could be displaying on a remote machine. This simply means use the first display on the local ...


1

In the simplest scenario, the so-called DDX (Device Dependent X) part of the X server will identify your video driver and use ioctl calls to initialize it, configure the video adapter and (usually) get the framebuffer address. The framebuffer will then be used for rendering. Here is a much more detailed description of the process. Things will get more ...


1

You should try looking in the logs of sshd, somehow you've come with invalid SSHD configuration, here is some guide on it: http://linux.die.net/man/5/sshd_config look where sshd is logging stuff and look there for potential issue why it is not running for you. This "ssh: connect to host macpro-c10c8b.imt.liu.se port 22: Connection refused" should guide you ...


0

As I understand it, there is no function in X Toolkit which can remove a translation. You can override or augment but not selectively remove a part of a translation table. That was one of the reasons for adding the omitTranslation resource in patch #269. With that version, the translations table is broken up into more manageable parts which allows ...


0

Regarding your new question... In grub menu, press c to open a command-line then type vbeinfo. Make a note of an available resolution e.g. 1366x768, then type reboot. Back in grub menu for 2nd time, type e and add GRUB_GFXMODE=1366x768 right after load_video (or edit it if GRUB_GFXMODE= is already present) - use a resolution that you confirmed was ...


1

If xmodmap tells you “bad keycode value”, it means you passed a bad keycode value. You can use the program xev to see what keycode a key sends: launch it from a terminal, press the key in the xev window, and watch the KeyPress event appearing in the terminal. Use the correct value where you wrote # in your question. You can also reassign keys based on the ...


1

Copied from Ji m's Ubuntu handbook: Open your file browser and navigate to “Computer-> sys -> class -> backlight” directory. You’ll see two or three folders there: !enter image description here In each folder there’s a file called actual_brightness, you can see its content (brightness value) through the thumbnail icon. !enter image ...


1

assuming that the # is used to indicate the keycode number, the first problem I notice is shell quoting. The shell implicitly concatenates strings unless separated. So when you type xmodmap -e "keycode # = """ it is equivalent to xmodmap -e "keycode # = " chances are you ment to type one of these xmodmap -e "keycode # = \"\"" xmodmap -e 'keycode # = ...


1

I solved the problem. The first part of the solution was the information by Gilles that xdotool is just a binary, so there's no need to install it. Just copying the executable to the remote machine (on which I have permission to run executables stored in my own directories) was sufficient. Note that when below I mention any command, I assume that the ...


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What you see is the normal way of twm to handle the mouse focus. The method is called focus follows mouse. Since 1989, twm was the default window manager of the X Window System. That means that it is a reference implementation, like other default components of X. Most reference implementations of other X components had incremental changes since that ...


0

xosd, which is available in Raspbian, can display text on top of the current X screen. It takes its input from a file or from the standard input: echo Hello | osd_cat -p middle -A center It's an old-style X11 application so its configuration can be verbose; changing the font in particular looks like echo Hello | osd_cat -p middle -A center -f ...


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Oh , You have to choose TUI instead of GUI, because you have embedded system, dialog has a strong , for example : mohsen@debian:~$ dialog --infobox "Hello world" 20 50 Output is : FreeBSD uses dialog.


1

I would love to see that feature myself, but I don't think it's possible. If an application takes a long time to start, there could be any number of things causing that: Whatever launched it could be slow to fork and execute it The filesystem could be slow to access the application's executable file (especially if, for example, it's a network filesystem) ...


1

As long as you only need simple button reassignment (as opposed to complex things like assigning commands to button combinations, or configuring different mice differently), the venerable xmodmap (a core X11 utility) can do the task. For example, to swap buttons 2 and 8 out of 12: xmodmap -e 'pointer = 1 8 3 4 5 6 7 2 9 10 11 12' Arrange to run this ...


3

You can use the pam_time PAM module to restrict logins for certain users on certain tty's (and at certain times of the day, which is the module's main use). So if you want to tell the system that logins on tty0 through tty7 (that is, all the VT's that are typically enabled) for all users other than root are never allowed, add this line to ...


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If you are mainly interested in the X11 protocol and not the underlying TCP/IP and ethernet stuff, and if you are able to adjust the client or the server settings, you might use a tool specifically designed to capture and decode the traffic between an X11 client and an X11 server. Unlike the wireshark X11 dissector, these tools are unlikely to be confused by ...


1

You could assign a shortcut to a command like: xclip -o -sel p | tr '[:lower:][:upper:]' '[:upper:][:lower:]' | xclip -i -sel c; xdotool key Shift+Insert This assumes Shift+Insert pastes from clipboard (if that's not the case, replace Shift+Insert with ctrl+v). It pipes the text from the primary selection to tr, overwrites the clipboard selection with the ...


0

The instructions miss the additional step of xset fp+ /usr/local/lib/X11/fonts/misc/. If the font.dir file is already there then you can skip the mkfontdir command.


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You can talk X11 over TCP, or over a Unix domain socket or (on Linux) on a Unix domain socket in the abstract namespace. When DISPLAY is set to host:4, short for tcp/host:4, clients use TCP to connect to the server. The TCP port is then 6000 plus the display number (in that case 6004). In that case, you can capture the traffic with any network sniffer like ...


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X11 uses TCP as its transport protocol. The TCP port range for X11 is usually 6000-6063 but most likely you will see TCP port 6000 being used. So, you should be able to use any network monitor of your choice to observe the traffic by filtering for this port range and the hosts in question. I also know, that wireshark, for instance, already contains a filter ...


1

If you are running on CentOS 7, the systemd-logind service may be able to handle this for you. It is responsible for session switch management and multi seat management. The loginctl command controls it - the loginctl link below has all the flags available. http://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/systemd-logind.service.html ...


0

Xpra has an html5 client which works really great, even though it is in an early development phase. I do personally use it as an X11 forwarding replacement, as it spawns an X11 session and only displays single applications, just as you've described. It has a 'shadow' option as well that allows to connect to an existing session as well.



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