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3

example.sh script to xcalc "4*9=", and view capture-result image: #!/usr/bin/env bash save="$DISPLAY" # save original X display number export DISPLAY=:44 # set random choosen display for xvfb case "$1" in # and x-programs called below start) Xvfb $DISPLAY & ;; ...


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My xdotool help informs me that your two switches are the same (xdotool version 3.20150503.1), --name check regexp_pattern agains the window name --title DEPRECATED. Same as --name. and as such doesn't do anything. My xdotool does the same as yours with replacing the window stack, so I did it with a shell script. A shell script doing what ...


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In X, there will be one application which owns the current selection, which usually (but not always) is visible. When you paste into an X client, that application asks the X server for the selection data, and the request is referred to the selection owner, who provides the information. The selection owner may be capable of providing the selection data in ...


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The graphical user interface on traditional Unix systems, as well as most modern Unix systems other than Mac OS X, is built on the X Window System. One component, the X server, communicates with the hardware (display and input peripherals) and offers basic primitives to display windows and route user input. Other programs, said to be X clients, display ...


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The XSetFillStyle function lives in the X11 library (also referred to as "Xlib"). Your example does not show that you use the X11 library, e.g, adding a -lX11 would help. (Some configurations require additional libraries): cc -DPIXMAP_SUPPORT -DHAVE_UNISTD_H -o Esetroot Esetroot.c -lImlib2 -lX11


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You probably need to set the extended window manager hint _NET_WM_STATE_ABOVE. In general, if you want to copy X behavior of other applications, you can use xprop (in my distribution packaged as xorg-xprop, YMMV). When launched from terminal, you can click on an application of which you want to see the window manager hints and properties. This can be of ...


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Technically Xlib is X11, although the developers of xcb have replaced parts of that with xcb (see Xlib and XCB). Doing that (to address limitations in the existing Xlib) was the purpose of writing xcb (see XCL : An Xlib Compatibility Layer For XCB). But no one has combined Xlib with Xt simply because the design goals differ a lot. Rather, other toolkits ...


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How do I use this information from ~# to trace back to what these really are? The output informs you about existing connections between your client and your server. In the first place, there is only session, then you opened gvim, which led to allocation of 3 channels, another gvim allocated another channel, but they are leaving some behind. ...


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Preferences->Default applications for LXSession or lxsession-default-apps Press autostart Uncheck the line opensnap -d (or remove it) log out/ login. Other things may work as well. The above can be done by editing the file ~/.config/lxsession/Lubuntu/autostart Lubuntu may also be LXDE in other configurations. I didn't even know opensnap was running.


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Use the -p or --persist option: gnuplot --persist -e 'plot sin(x)' This will keep the window open until manually closed. From the man page: -p, --persist lets plot windows survive after main gnuplot program exits.


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The X window manager is started through the command ssh-agent dbus-launcher --exit-with-session i3, which means that the SSH agent is started right before the window manager. However, Debian sources .xsessionrc before this happens, so when xautolocker gets started, the SSH agent hasn't started and the environment variables needed for ssh-add to talk to the ...


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On a technical level, there's no way to tell that the string a program is requesting will be used as a password. On the other hand, there are kdesu and gksudo which are, to a first approximation, "sudo but with a popup window for the password".


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Generally, a unix system requires root to start X (or a display manager, which runs within X). Without a display manager, if root starts X then the current user of the X session is root. With a display manager, root starts X and the display manager, but then allows other users to start sessions within that environment. This means that even though it took ...


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Actually this is the very purpose of so-called "Tiling Window Managers" i.e. Awesome, as apposed the classic "Floating Window Managers" i.e. Gnome2. So yeah, I think to do what you want to do you're going to need to upgrade from gnome to something a bit more hardcore. But believe me, you won't want to go back after you've experienced what these other Window ...



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