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18

It's an environment variable that is passed just to that program, rather than the shell as a whole. This happens when you set a variable on the same line as a command. X11 programs need to know where to display windows, since it's a client/server system and you could be displaying on a remote machine. This simply means use the first display on the local ...


7

The X server has several ways of communicating with X clients (apps). The most common one to use, at least on the same machine, is a Unix-domain socket. A Unix-domain socket is like the more familiar TCP ones, except that instead of connecting to an address and port, you connect to a path. You use an actual file (a socket file) to connect. The X server ...


7

DISPLAY=:0 gnome-panel is a shell command that runs the external command gnome-panel with the environment variable DISPLAY set to :0. The shell syntax VARIABLE=VALUE COMMAND sets the environment variable VARIABLE for the duration of the specified command only. It is roughly equivalent to (export VARIABLE=VALUE; exec COMMAND). The environment variable ...


6

On my fairly up-to-date Arch laptop, /tmp/.X11-unix/ is a directory with one entry: X0, a Unix-domain socket. The X11 server (usuall Xorg these days) communicates with clients like xterm, firefox, etc via some kind of reliable stream of bytes. A Unix domain socket is probably a bit more secure than a TCP socket open to the world, and probably a bit faster, ...


6

You can set up an X server inside an X server using Xephyr. You can create a window on your screen which displays the contents of a new X display: Xephyr :1 To start with, that will be empty. You can launch an application or applications pointed at that new display: DISPLAY=:1 some-application All windows that arise from that application will be ...


5

For yanks, Vim supports setting both unnamed and unnamedplus: :set clipboard=unnamed,unnamedplus From :help clipboard-unnamedplus: When "unnamed" is also included to the option, yank operations (but not delete, change or put) will additionally copy the text into register '*'.


3

My first thought was xsetroot but I think that the following Python snippet will do it better: import gtk import sys def create_window(): window = gtk.Window() window.set_default_size(200, 200) window.connect('destroy', gtk.main_quit) color = gtk.gdk.color_parse(str(sys.argv[1])) window.modify_bg(gtk.STATE_NORMAL, color) ...


2

You can use xdotool to set window's WM_WINDOW_ROLE property: $ xdotool set_window --role <ROLE_STRING> <WINDOW_ID> You can find WINDOW_ID by PID: $ xdotool search --onlyvisible --pid <PID> Note that there is a harmless bug message printed in xdotool 2.x when using this method: $ xdotool search --onlyvisible --pid 16076 Can't consume ...


2

As per xorg docs and archwiki: You must specify as many variants as the number of specified layouts. If you want the default variant, specify an empty string as the variant (the comma must stay) i.e. setxkbmap -layout "L1,L2, ... ,Ln" -variant "V1,V2, ... ,Vn" In your case: setxkbmap -layout "de,fr" -variant "nodeadkeys,basic"


2

Starting a graphical session requires the creation of files in the /tmp directory. If your user no longer has write permission to that directory, graphical logins will fail. To see that this is the issue, switch to a virtual terminal (press Ctrl+Alt+F2) and log in normally. If the changed permissions on /tmp are the reason, your log in should succeed. To ...


2

I am afraid I know of no application that does this. Developing one would probably require creating your own input method (to replace XIM). However, I can offer you an alternative that you may find far more helpful than simply changing the key layout. X (through XIM), for some time now, has offered a utility called XCompose. XCompose allows you to type ...


2

You only have the permission to start an X session with startx if you're logged in on a console. Remote users (for example) don't get this permission. When you run /bin/su -c /usr/bin/startx -l bateman from /etc/inittab, you don't get a console so starting the X server fails. The normal way to get a GUI at run time is to run a display manager. A display ...


1

Either in the order listed in the X.Org build.sh script or by figuring out the dependency tree in the X.Org jhbuild modules file. Note that X11R7.7 is nearly three years old now, and many of the modules have had newer versions, with security fixes, released since then, in the X.Org individual releases archive.


1

X11 (classic) Run the program xev from a terminal to see the keycode sent by the CapsLock key. That's the number just after keycode on the third line from the KeyPress event line corresponding to pressing the key. On a PC, the keycode is 66. Create a file called .Xmodmap in your home directory and add the line keycode 66 = Mode_switch clear Lock ...


1

As others have mentioned it's likely to a specific service or process, which you should be able to kill. You can start gnome-system-monitor as root to see all of the processes on the system and their CPU load. Instead of rebooting next time try a few things: Use the CTRL+ALT+F1 through F7 to switch to another terminal. This will cause your X graphics ...


1

systemd is not backwards compatible with System 5 init, only System 5 rc. You've switched from Debian 7 to the prospective Debian 8. This has, probably unbeknownst to you, switched your system management from (Linux) System 5 init+rc to systemd. systemd is the default init system, and that particular upgrade performs this switch. Linux System 5-style ...


1

In the simplest scenario, the so-called DDX (Device Dependent X) part of the X server will identify your video driver and use ioctl calls to initialize it, configure the video adapter and (usually) get the framebuffer address. The framebuffer will then be used for rendering. Here is a much more detailed description of the process. Things will get more ...


1

You should try looking in the logs of sshd, somehow you've come with invalid SSHD configuration, here is some guide on it: http://linux.die.net/man/5/sshd_config look where sshd is logging stuff and look there for potential issue why it is not running for you. This "ssh: connect to host macpro-c10c8b.imt.liu.se port 22: Connection refused" should guide you ...


1

Here there is my own solution, I have modified a little my old tutorial on my website linked on this page: this code will try to download my master repository on github link="https://github.com/nowardev/kde-peace-settings/archive/master.zip" #my own github stuff a=$(kdialog --progressbar "W-Get will download: Nowardev GitHub Master stuff " ...


1

In my case adding this string to /etc/ssh/sshd_config solved the problem: X11UseLocalhost no


1

It isn't an exact answer, but have you tried pressing fn+delete? This should act as a real Delete, vs its actual action of 'backspace' and is very near to the power key. Another tip: fn+enter acts as an Insert button, so you should be able to press shift+fn+enter and Paste like a middle click.


1

If you're using Xorg.conf to set up your X Server, you can use that in order to set acceleration or deceleration. Just add something to the effect of: Section "InputDevice" Identifier "name" Driver "evdev" Option "ConstantDeceleration" "multiplier" EndSection where multiplier is how many times slower you want the mouse to go. 0.5 would double ...



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