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6

The disable didn't work because the Debian /etc/X11/default-display-manager logic is winding up overriding it. In order to make text boot the default under systemd (regardless of which distro, really): systemctl set-default multi-user.target To change back to booting to the GUI, systemctl set-default graphical.target I confirmed those work on my ...


3

Reset the user by moving everything in /home/faultyuser to a backup directory like this: mkdir /home/faultyuser/BACKUP mv /home/faultyuser/* /home/faultyuser/BACKUP mv /home/faultyuser/.* /home/faultyuser/BACKUP cp -v /etc/skel/.[a-z]* /home/faultyuser/ chown faultyuser:faultyuser /home/faultyuser/.* and try to login. When this works, move all you need ...


2

The most natural way would be to kill the session manager process for that session. Killing the session manager ends the session. On Linux, you can use ps xeww | grep DISPLAY=:1 to list processes that have DISPLAY=:1 in their environment. Many other Unix variants have a way to do this, but the options to ps vary. Beware that this can return false positives ...


2

When working with LVM (Logical Volume Manager) you should bare in mind that the order of operation is imperative. If you do not follow the order you risk losing your data. If you already have a PV(Physical Volume) and a VG(Volume Group) it is easier to extend the volume group by adding additional devices. To extend the volume group e.g vg1 you can do the ...


1

X can work without a Desktop Environment or Window Manager. That's what you get if your login manager offers a "Failsafe" option. Have a look at /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc. It may be enough to run unset WINDOWMANAGER; startx from the console to achieve this.


1

Try the following command: echo "manual" | sudo tee -a /etc/init/lightdm.override


1

I don't know much about Debian, but on my Ubuntu 14.04 laptop, here is the standard procedure I use when I want to disable X and boot to command prompt for troubleshooting: Edit the file /etc/default/grub in superuser mode and set GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text" Optionally, also uncomment this line: #GRUB_TERMINAL=console and then do sudo update-...


1

Putting a script like the one below in /etc/cron.hourlyshould be able to accomplish your goal. The $? grabs the exit status and if it not equal to 0 then it executes the command, otherwise it does nothing. #!/bin/bash email=user@localhost address=192.168.0.2 ping -c 3 "${address}" > /dev/null 2>&1 if [ $? -ne 0 ]; then echo "Pi is down" | ...


1

Edit /etc/X11/Xwrapper.config as follow : allowed_users=anybody needs_root_rights=yes Source


1

Sugar tries to run xdg-user-dirs-update: File "/usr/libexec/sugar-runner/xinitrc", line 77, in _setup_xdg_user_dirs subprocess.check_call("xdg-user-dirs-update") which you don't have. Install the package xdg-user-dirs which includes it. /edit: For your new error message you'll have to wait until the Sugar guys fix that, they already have an open pull ...


1

You probably meant to run: Xvfb :1 -screen 0 1024x768x16 & where the :1 is an argument on its own and means use the default network connection +1, i.e. you will need to export DISPLAY=:1 in the environment to connect to this display. Also, the X11 server may run under the name X instead of Xorg.


1

Without Xorg on server you can't initiate -X forwarding from your client. If you are interested in editing files, the easiest way is to mount the server to your local computer using sshfs(1). You can consult manual page for more info about this.


1

I am assuming you want X11 forwarding through PuTTy on a Windows operating system. Please see the answer to the following related question: http://superuser.com/questions/119792/how-to-use-x11-forwarding-with-putty


1

Most simple X11 applications just need you to set the environment variable DISPLAY, so just export DISPLAY=:0 before running the command may be enough.


1

# Show all active login shells, with displays $ w -oush trunc-us tty1 23:02 -bash trunc-us tty7 :0 4days /sbin/upstart --user trunc-us pts/4 :0 w -oush # Capture the Display part $ w -oush | grep -Eo ' :[0-9]+' :0 :0 # only unique lines $ w -oush | grep -Eo ' :[0-9]+' | uniq :0 # trim ...



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