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1

Your interface name is eth1 and not wlan0. Replace wlan0 in all commands with eth1, and it should work.


4

Preferred DHCP addresses are usually configured on the DHCP server side. You will need to add an entry in your DHCP server's address table for your device's MAC address and assign it to an IP address. DHCP servers can vary. If this is a small network your DHCP server may be your router or gateway. The address can fall in the range of DHCP addresses but it ...


1

If your system is not reporting a device wlan0 as available then the Linux kernel was unsuccessful in detecting your hardware and associating a driver to it. I would start by looking in the dmesg output for any messaging related to the Broadcom device. If it's being reported there in any way then the appropriate driver is either not present within the ...


0

I assume you are using wpa_supplicant to connect to wireless networks. I believe you should always whitelist and never blacklist, i.e. that you should use explicit configuration for unauthenticated networks as well as for authenticated ones. Otherwise you never know where you are connecting and you will often end up with defunct conectivity. There are tools ...


1

You can't. Easiest solution for you would be for your AP to ban the MAC address of your client. That, or just stop trying to connect to every open BSS network out there.


0

Alternately leave the password entry blank. If you're running wpa_gui, it will prompt you for the password. (I do this with eduroam accounts, as my password is the same as my *nix login)


0

wireless-tools (i.e. iwlist, iwconfig, iwpriv ...) are prehistoric and should be replaced by invocations of iw. The wireless- things in /etc/network/interfaces are not handled by wpa_supplicant, but by those old wireless-tools, which ships scripts in /etc/network/if-*.d/wireless-tools. Compare with the script shipped by wpa_supplicant in ...


0

Recent updates to wpa_supplicant have apparently solved this problem. (I am no longer using Linux Mint. I have since switched to Manjaro, which uses wpa_supplicant 2.1 at the time of this writing.)


0

By default, if an interface is listed in /etc/network/interfaces, NetworkManager will be smart and not touch this interface, to avoid both configuration method to interfere with each other. Comment the /etc/network/interfaces definition concerning your wireless device and restart NetworkManager.


2

Probably what is happening here is that some other process owns the wireless chip inside your computer, so NetworkManager isn't allowed to do anything. In this case, that process would be wpa_supplicant or whatever is calling wpa_supplicant (and acting on the information in /etc/network/interfaces). Instead of randomly installing things, you should stop and ...



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