Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

How about iwgetid? The iwgetid(8) man page says: iwgetid is used to find out the NWID, ESSID or AP/Cell Address of the wireless network that is currently used.


2

Braiam suggested in the comments that if wpa_supplicant@wlan0 doesn't exist, I may need to create it myself, and also pointed me to a page in the Arch Linux wiki describing how to do so. I had to tweak things slightly for Fedora, but the following worked for me: Create a systemd unit, /etc/systemd/system/network-wireless@.service: [Unit] ...


1

Those two errors of rfkill are by Rfkill, a tool for enabling and disabling wireless devices. Most of the time the kernel does not have rfkill enabled in it. And so there is no /dev/rfkill file present, and rfkill command will give errors like rfkill: Cannot open RFKILL control device Control device here means /dev/rfkill


1

Just put your command in /etc/rc.local. Make sure it's on a single line. sudo wpa_supplicant -i eth0 -D wired -c /etc/wpa_supplicant/mywired.conf -B I assume that your connection is stable and not dropping. Do comment if your connection drops. I'll make a script. Have to sleep now.


1

If you want wpa-supplicant to run using that config upon boot, then you should put the command in rc.local. As root, open up /etc/rc.local in a text editor and paste in your command: wpa_supplicant -i eth0 -D wired -c /etc/wpa_supplicant/mywired.conf -B Make sure that Systemd is running rc.local: sudo systemctl enable rc-local and reboot. Should work. ...


1

Used the compiler provided in FriendlyARM toolschain (download from friendlARM ftp server): export CC=/opt/FriendlyARM/toolschain/4.5.1/bin/arm-none-linux-gnueabi-gcc I followed these instructions Modified .config as follow: CFLAGS += -I/home/vagrant/libnl-3.2.24/include LIBS += -L/home/vagrant/libnl-3.2.24/lib # Use libnl v2.0 (or 3.0) libraries. ...


1

I managed to find another way of setting the regulatory domain in debian which is setting the REGDOMAIN variable in /etc/default/crda


1

Apparently these networks with web-based auth rely on MAC based access control post-authentication, so you can simply authenticate on a different device while spoofing your Pi's MAC address, and then your Pi should be able to get on the network. Got this tip from http://frankiejarrett.com/how-to-connect-apple-tv-to-a-hotel-wi-fi-network/


1

You can bring up the wireless interface from the command line to get yourself bootstrapped. Debian Jessie's essential packages have all you need to do this. Let's say the SSID is "example" and its WPA2 pre-shared key is "abcdefg". Create a file wpa_supplicant.conf containing: network={ ssid="example" psk="abcdefg" scan_ssid=1 } Now as root say: # ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible