Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Finally, I've found out a solution, just an other line (previous not needed: wpa-ap-scan) wpa-scan-ssid 1 I've not really found it in any documentation... just in a forum post.


4

wpa_supplicant does have support for ndiswrapper and should be run like this: wpa_supplicant -i wlan0 -D wext Instructions how to install ndiswrapper drivers - however I never use ndiswrapper. If it does not help you have to say what is the output of: wpa_supplicant -i wlan0 -D wext As a side note - to use WPA you need user program called wpa ...


4

You can check what the access point is broadcasting in its beacons by doing this (you'll need the wireless-tools package): $ sudo iwlist wlan0 scanning The output varies by device, and will display every SSID the interface can see. My WPA2 access point gives this (from iwlist's very verbose output): IE: IEEE 802.11i/WPA2 Version 1 Group Cipher : ...


4

Preferred DHCP addresses are usually configured on the DHCP server side. You will need to add an entry in your DHCP server's address table for your device's MAC address and assign it to an IP address. DHCP servers can vary. If this is a small network your DHCP server may be your router or gateway. The address can fall in the range of DHCP addresses but it ...


3

Unfortunately I have to answer the question myself now. "Unfortunately" because the answer is "No, it is not possible". I took a look at how PAP is working, and came to the conclusion that it is logically impossible to store the password as a hash value. With PAP, the username and password are sent directly to the authentification side. Therefore, the ...


3

wpa_passphrase [ ssid ] [ passphrase ] generates a WPA PSK from an ASCII passphrase for a SSID. Then store it as network={ ssid="your ssid" psk=outputfromabove }


3

I have the same problem. /etc/network/interfaces Manpage says for dhcp method: hwaddress class address Hardware Address. class is one of ether, ax25, ARCnet or netrom. address is dependent on this choice. then maybe the problem is the class option. I'll try it. Other option is not supported by firmware.


2

No, wpa_supplicant cannot change interface's MAC address. But if you have root shell on your Android you can try to change MAC address with ifconfig.


2

As last quote says, you have "dhcp", when you should have "manual" for wlan0. Try changing iface wlan0 inet dhcp to iface wlan0 inet manual in /etc/network/interfaces. Another choice is to use manager for network connections, for example Gnome's Network Manager or WICD.


2

The errors wpa_supplicant produces are not necessarily related to your wpa_cli connection problem. The trouble here is that wpa_cli is unable to establish connection with wpa_supplicant - unable to open the control socket. This can have several causes: user running wpa_cli is unable to access the socket given e.g. in wpa_supplicant.conf: ...


2

This is probably your dhcp client blocking until it the interface has an address. The exact answer will depend on what init system you use and what dhcp client you use. For dhcpcd, for example, you want to make sure the init script that launches it is called with the -b flag (background immediately), and if it has the -w flag (wait), to erase it. One ...


2

Probably what is happening here is that some other process owns the wireless chip inside your computer, so NetworkManager isn't allowed to do anything. In this case, that process would be wpa_supplicant or whatever is calling wpa_supplicant (and acting on the information in /etc/network/interfaces). Instead of randomly installing things, you should stop and ...


2

The key to solving problems such as this is knowing how to ask the question. I searched Google looking for "how to access panera bread wifi" and turned up this gem. Auto login to open Wifi This article had several scripts that could be used to facilitate the auto logging in. I've opted to include the example for Panera Bread which leverages Python's ...


2

No, you cannot replace the password by a hash. It doesn't matter what the protocol is. The client needs to know the password, and then either it sends the password to the server, or it sends some data that proves that the client knows the password. The server can be content to know the hash of the real password, because when it receives a candidate ...


2

Since you have the wireless tools and wpa supplicant installed, you have all you need. But for WEP you don't need the wpa supplicant. Configure your network via /etc/network/interfaces: auto wlan1 iface wlan1 inet dhcp wireless-key <key> wireless-essid <ESSID>


2

You can set the option disabled=1 in the corresponding network entry in wpa_supplicant.conf. This will prevent wpa_supplicant to automatically connect to the network (it'll still try to connect to it if you specifically ask it to do so).


2

Just Download a Live-Distro of your choice (with wpa_supplicant) with the same arch (32/64 bit) you'll choose for gentoo later, too Create a bootable USB-Stick from it Boot from the USB-Stick Most of the upcomping steps require root privileges, so you could do a su in your Live-Distro and go on as root. Create your partitions (/boot,/home/,/) e.g. with ...


1

By default, if an interface is listed in /etc/network/interfaces, NetworkManager will be smart and not touch this interface, to avoid both configuration method to interfere with each other. Comment the /etc/network/interfaces definition concerning your wireless device and restart NetworkManager.


1

Depending on how the authentication is implemented, you may be able to send a HTTP request to gain access. This depends on numerous aspects of the particular implementation though. Keep in mind, these types of authentication are put into place to keep autonomous systems out while allowing only browsers to have access, which is exactly what you are trying ...


1

It is little known feature, but Conky can be run in console mode with its variables describing network: http://conky.sourceforge.net/variables.html You could edit any conkyrc and use output_to_x and output_to_console variables to have conky render text in console. Also you could try wifi-menu (for network selection and control) and wawemon (nice wifi ...


1

Looks like you are missing the wpa keyword in your hostname.iwn0. You have: dhcp nwid Livebox-5dxx wpakey xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx I think it should be: dhcp nwid Livebox-5dxx wpa wpakey xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx It's normal for it to report the wpakey as 0xabcdef..... ifconfig allows you to specify a passphrase as a convenience to you. It ...


1

1 - You could follow this other answer to edit your /etc/hostname.iwn0 and add the wpapsk parameter Automatic internet connection on startup in OpenBSD? 2 - The Hex key is calculated based on your network id, and wpa passphrase(wpa-psk). Try this site, is very usefull: http://jorisvr.nl/wpapsk.html Check if the Hex Key calculated on this site is the ...


1

I know thats not 'the Anwser', and also a bit late - But its to large for a comment. Maybe it helps... My Configuration was not wrong, it just took to long to connect and caused a timeout, setting explicit values speeded it up and the autentication was finished in time. Try to do so with eapol_flags and eap, try disabling eap_workaround or fast_reauth. ...


1

To get log into file for multiple WLAN interface you would have to run one wpa_supplicant instance per WLAN interface with -f and -d options. This way you'll get one log file per interface. I don't think, that wpa_supplicant would automatically change its verbosity level after connection. You could submit such a feature request. Another way to troubleshoot ...


1

You are confusing kernel drivers and user-space drivers. In your case, you may certainly use WEXT, but also nl80211 (I think). WEXT (or WE= Wireless Extensions) are the modification introduced to the Linux kernel in 1997 by Jean Tourrhiles. According to this Web page written by Tourrhiles himself, The Wireless Extension (WE) is a generic API allowing ...


1

Reading the pacman man page, it looks to me like you could do this: pacman --root /mnt -S wpa_supplicant while you have the "live Arch" CD booted, and the "/" partitioned mounted on /mnt. That might be a little more complicated if you have a separate /usr partition. You'll probably have to fix up the /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf file after ...


1

Did you setup your passphrase with wpa_passphrase? e.g %> wpa_passphrase SSID passphrase network={ ssid="SSID" #psk="passphrase" psk=28964ba6ea8b8f3a0db1c4414b327da253d0af5d4f4adccec0f8abf5b05b10f8 } Otherwise wpa_supplicant -B -i [wireless device] -c /etc/wpa_supplicant/cli.conf won't work at all


1

This kind of problem is better divided into independent parts. In this case, circumventing ifupdown completely and doing all the steps manually - that is: run wpa_supplicant with an appropriate config file once connection is established, running dhcp client, To check how ifupdown runs wpa_supplicant - it has to pass it some sort of configuration in a ...


1

This is the order of things I'd try when debugging a flaky wireless device. Does a reboot resolve the issue? Try unloading the kernel drivers related to the wireless device. Something to the effect of the following: $ lsmod | grep iw iwlagn 209751 0 iwlcore 195714 1 iwlagn mac80211 229095 2 iwlagn,iwlcore ...


1

Do one of these: Instead of using hwaddress, try using pre-up ifconfig wlan0 hw ether 00:11:22:55:55:D1 This may not actually have been required, but I found that on my bonded interface, hwaddress did not work, the above ifconfig did. I would recommend you either create a bonded interface or a bridge (if bridge, you should be using bridge_hw ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible