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16

The setting you're looking for is listed under "Window manager tweaks". XFCE menu Settings Window Manager Tweaks Focus "When a window raises itself" "Do nothing" Note that you cannot get the behavior where it will show raised windows on other workspaces. You can have it show all windows on all workspaces, or the current workspace. There's no option ...


7

Short answer: yes, you can do this. I have my (Fedora) desktop set up this way, each monitor is an independent display. It is the same 'desktop', in the X sense, but there are some limitations to typical desktop functionality with this setup versus the 'single desktop spread over two monitors' configuration. [For example, you can't drag a window from one ...


5

Have you try this? If you right-click the workspace switcher and choose preferences, you can adjust rows and columns from there. http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-desktop-74/add-more-workspace-in-fedora-13-a-825426/


4

The short answer is not without applying patches. But you could use a different window manager / desktop environment. Enlightenment, for example, supports this feature.


4

Use gdevilspie to match this application and set the workspace.


4

you do not need any external tools, just read man fluxbox-apps, edit .fluxbox/apps and put there something like [app] (name=xyz) [workspace] (n) [end]


4

Perhaps you're getting confused with the -t # switch. The windows are numbered as starting with a 1 but the first window is actually number 0. Notice in the output of wmctrl -l: $ wmctrl -l 0x00c00028 -1 grinchy Top Expanded Edge Panel 0x0120001e 0 grinchy x-nautilus-desktop 0x06015fee 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ 0x06000004 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ ...


3

It is now in System Settings => Window Tiling and Edge Flip which, really, should have been evident from the name:


3

There doesn't seem to much motivation to implement some EWMH support in Firefox nor in Chrome, even though this would get the restoration to workspace issue resolved with a large number of desktops. A bug has been open for Firefox since 2007 and one for Chrome since 2009. What you can do outside of Firefox and Chrome, if the active TABs in different browser ...


3

You need to open Cinnamon Settings => Windows => Uncheck "Enable Edge Flip":


3

Devil's Pie? https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Devilspie


3

The default keyboard shortcut to switch between workspaces: Alt + Ctrl + [arrow key]


3

Check out Devil's Pie (although i am not sure it would work with Gnome3), and you can find more useful information on stackoverflow bash. Basically you should do the following: #!/bin/bash wmctrl -n 8 firefox & thunderbird & /usr/bin/netbeans --locale en & amsn & gnome-terminal & sleep 15 wmctrl -r firefox -t 0 wmctrl -r netbeans -t 1 ...


2

that desktop wallpaper is the default debian 6.0 ("squeeze") wallpaper, the spiral is the debian logo a and the spaceship is possibly a reference to squeeze(tm pixar) this works in debian: right-click the panel (menu bar) left click "add to panel" from the list select "workplace switcher" as far as i can tell the switcher is built into xfce-panel. ...


2

[I think this is most appropriate to list as a separate answer, 2.5 years later] It is possible to do this with the assistance of xbindkeys. Install (#apt-get install xbindkeys), and then add this to the bottom of ~/.xbindkeysrc: # Previous desktop "dbus-send --session --type=method_call --dest=org.Cinnamon /org/Cinnamon org.Cinnamon.switchWorkspaceLeft" ...


2

You can do it, but it's not particularly pleasant (and don't forget that in the default configuration, M-k and MS-k are already used to cycle between windows and move windows around in the stack order - you probably don't want to mask those functions). What follows is based on a brief look at the source in XMonad/Config.hs. You will need to import ...


2

This is not an answer but a suggestion on how you might find the answer. Try running xev, You should be able to confirm that scrolling up/down in the xev window produces logs with mouse button 4 and 5 e.g.: ButtonRelease event, serial 46, synthetic NO, window 0x4000001, root 0xc4, subw 0x0, time 169151426, (78,60), root:(142,831), state 0x800, ...


2

What you're looking for sounds like a window tagging facility. I doubt KDE has support for this, other WMs (like XMonad or DWM etc) do. Thus one possibility to achieve this productivity boost would be to trade kwin in for XMonad and configure XMonad to do tagging. The XMonad tagging mechanism as described in the second link would be to bind a key ...


2

The following option is from man screen: -d -R Reattach a session and if necessary detach or even create it first. Use it with -S to set the session name.


2

Use the gnome-control-center to assign keyboard shortcuts to the different desktops. Depending on the version of GNOME you use the item will probably be named differently. On GNOME 2.32 it's called Keyboard Shortcuts.


2

I don't think there's a less hackish solution involving Nautilus than this one: As far as I can see, Nautilus displays what XDG tells it your desktop is (see env | grep XDG; but let's assume it's ~/Desktop) and there seems to be now way to change this setting without restarting Nautilus. You can (probably, untested) change what ~/Desktop on changing your ...


2

KDE uses the term workspace to refer to the whole kit and kaboodle, not individual parts. (Virtual) desktops is used to refer to screen pages, and activities to groups of desktops. If you look in System Settings -> Workspace Behavior -> Virtual Desktops you'll see a Switching tab where you can set animations. You can also tick Desktop Switch On-Screen ...


1

Install Compiz Configuration Manager (from Software Centre or run sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager). Open it, under the Effects category deselect Animations, Fading windows.


1

I would love to see that feature myself, but I don't think it's possible. If an application takes a long time to start, there could be any number of things causing that: Whatever launched it could be slow to fork and execute it The filesystem could be slow to access the application's executable file (especially if, for example, it's a network filesystem) ...


1

As this post from Arch Linux Forums suggested, the problem was with VirtualBox rather than any other component. Simply disabling automatic mouse integration fixed the problem. I'm not sure exactly why this is causing problems. An even better answer would of course be one that solves this without disabling automatic mouse integration.


1

Happens for me too - very annoying. I used to have 5 workspaces in a row under Ubuntu 10.04. However, I did find that putting 4 workspaces in 2 rows stops the windows from jumping around. It's harder to click on a workspace but that's my fix for now.


1

There is an option for that in the recent Cinnamon versions. Open "Cinnamon Settings", click on "Hot Corner" and choose "Top Right". If you do not have this option, you need to update Cinnamon: $ sudo apt-get install cinnamon


1

I'm running 17.1 and the Edge Flip choice has been moved to the 'Window Tiling and Edge Flip' section of system settings, under the Preferences category. It's a checkbox titled 'Enable Edge Flip'.


1

I'm also really keen on getting this working (it's one thing I really miss from compiz!). Right now, as far as I'm aware, the Cinnamon/Muffin API doesn't seem to expose the necessary events, but as soon as it does I will write an extension to do this. In the mean time, there is an extension available that I'm using as a second-best solution. Perhaps it ...


1

For the most part, -S foo -d -RR will do what you want: it attaches to the session whose name you specify, and creates one if one doesn't exist already. I like to go a bit further, and look for name-specific configuration files. This lets me define different environment variables, startup applications, and so on for different session names. This is my file ...



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