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5

The setting you're looking for is listed under "Window manager tweaks". XFCE menu Settings Window Manager Tweaks Focus "When a window raises itself" "Do nothing" Note that you cannot get the behavior where it will show raised windows on other workspaces. You can have it show all windows on all workspaces, or the current workspace. There's no option ...


4

Use gdevilspie to match this application and set the workspace.


3

Have you try this? If you right-click the workspace switcher and choose preferences, you can adjust rows and columns from there. http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-desktop-74/add-more-workspace-in-fedora-13-a-825426/


3

It is now in System Settings => Window Tiling and Edge Flip which, really, should have been evident from the name:


3

You need to open Cinnamon Settings => Windows => Uncheck "Enable Edge Flip":


3

you do not need any external tools, just read man fluxbox-apps, edit .fluxbox/apps and put there something like [app] (name=xyz) [workspace] (n) [end]


3

Check out Devil's Pie (although i am not sure it would work with Gnome3), and you can find more useful information on stackoverflow bash. Basically you should do the following: #!/bin/bash wmctrl -n 8 firefox & thunderbird & /usr/bin/netbeans --locale en & amsn & gnome-terminal & sleep 15 wmctrl -r firefox -t 0 wmctrl -r netbeans -t 1 ...


3

The short answer is not without applying patches. But you could use a different window manager / desktop environment. Enlightenment, for example, supports this feature.


3

The default keyboard shortcut to switch between workspaces: Alt + Ctrl + [arrow key]


2

The following option is from man screen: -d -R Reattach a session and if necessary detach or even create it first. Use it with -S to set the session name.


2

What you're looking for sounds like a window tagging facility. I doubt KDE has support for this, other WMs (like XMonad or DWM etc) do. Thus one possibility to achieve this productivity boost would be to trade kwin in for XMonad and configure XMonad to do tagging. The XMonad tagging mechanism as described in the second link would be to bind a key ...


2

that desktop wallpaper is the default debian 6.0 ("squeeze") wallpaper, the spiral is the debian logo a and the spaceship is possibly a reference to squeeze(tm pixar) this works in debian: right-click the panel (menu bar) left click "add to panel" from the list select "workplace switcher" as far as i can tell the switcher is built into xfce-panel. ...


2

Use the gnome-control-center to assign keyboard shortcuts to the different desktops. Depending on the version of GNOME you use the item will probably be named differently. On GNOME 2.32 it's called Keyboard Shortcuts.


2

Devil's Pie? https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Devilspie


2

I don't think there's a less hackish solution involving Nautilus than this one: As far as I can see, Nautilus displays what XDG tells it your desktop is (see env | grep XDG; but let's assume it's ~/Desktop) and there seems to be now way to change this setting without restarting Nautilus. You can (probably, untested) change what ~/Desktop on changing your ...


2

KDE uses the term workspace to refer to the whole kit and kaboodle, not individual parts. (Virtual) desktops is used to refer to screen pages, and activities to groups of desktops. If you look in System Settings -> Workspace Behavior -> Virtual Desktops you'll see a Switching tab where you can set animations. You can also tick Desktop Switch On-Screen ...


2

Perhaps you're getting confused with the -t # switch. The windows are numbered as starting with a 1 but the first window is actually number 0. Notice in the output of wmctrl -l: $ wmctrl -l 0x00c00028 -1 grinchy Top Expanded Edge Panel 0x0120001e 0 grinchy x-nautilus-desktop 0x06015fee 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ 0x06000004 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ ...


2

You can do it, but it's not particularly pleasant (and don't forget that in the default configuration, M-k and MS-k are already used to cycle between windows and move windows around in the stack order - you probably don't want to mask those functions). What follows is based on a brief look at the source in XMonad/Config.hs. You will need to import ...


1

This can be Configured via Compiz http://www.maketecheasier.com/terminal-as-transparent-wallpaper-in-ubuntu/2008/05/21 Requires CompizFusion that is come preinstalled if you are running Ubuntu Gutsy or Hardy. If your computer does not supports Compiz, you can follow the method here


1

According to your user informations, you live in France, so I assume that you use an AZERTY keyboard. XMonad default configuration is made for QWERTY keyboards which have direct access to numbers, while you have to use shift to access them on a french AZERTY keyboard. XMonad.Config.Azerty fixes this by remapping the key to the corresponding characters. To ...


1

You need to set this behaviour for the "Window Buttons" plugin. In the panel settings go to the "Items" tab, and edit preferences for the "Windows Buttons" plugin - there are several filtering options, on my system it looks like this: You seem to be interested in the first one.


1

There is an option for that in the recent Cinnamon versions. Open "Cinnamon Settings", click on "Hot Corner" and choose "Top Right". If you do not have this option, you need to update Cinnamon: $ sudo apt-get install cinnamon


1

Happens for me too - very annoying. I used to have 5 workspaces in a row under Ubuntu 10.04. However, I did find that putting 4 workspaces in 2 rows stops the windows from jumping around. It's harder to click on a workspace but that's my fix for now.


1

Yes, and you get a fun infinity effect as a bonus! You need to set up a VNC server on your machine, and then open a VNC viewer on the same machine which you connect to yourself. I'd suggest opening the VNC client as "View Only", or else moving the mouse pointer over window causes serious confusion, but you'll be able to see the other screen. I don't use ...


1

For the most part, -S foo -d -RR will do what you want: it attaches to the session whose name you specify, and creates one if one doesn't exist already. I like to go a bit further, and look for name-specific configuration files. This lets me define different environment variables, startup applications, and so on for different session names. This is my file ...


1

Take a look at devil's pie, an app written to allow such customization on GNOME 2. Note that if/when you move to GNOME 3, things might work very differently…


1

You should be able to change the settings by right clicking on the bottom pannel. If I remember; there is a check box that says something like "keep windows on their own desktop" or something to that effect.



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