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6

I'm guessing the real problem is that you don't know what a SSID is. It's the technical term for the network's name, i.e. the thing that shows up in a listing of available networks. If you don't know what network you're supposed to connect to, you'll have to ask somebody at your location. As the Arch wiki explains, you can get a list of available networks ...


5

Udev is the system component that determines the names of devices under Linux — mostly file names under /dev, but also the names of network interfaces. Versions of udev from 099 to 196 come with rules to record the names of network interfaces and always use the same number for the same device. These rules are disabled by default starting from udev 174, but ...


4

One method for configuring multiple NIC cards is through the use of what's called bonding. It goes by other names as well: Bonding Channel Bonding Link Aggregation Using NetworkManager What version of NetworkManager are you using? Version 0.9.8 is the first that purports to offer support for network bonding. excerpt from phoronix.com Add a ...


3

You can use the iwconfig tool to find this info out: $ iwconfig wlan0 wlan0 IEEE 802.11bg ESSID:"SECRETSSID" Mode:Managed Frequency:2.462 GHz Access Point: 00:10:7A:93:AE:BF Bit Rate=48 Mb/s Tx-Power=14 dBm Retry long limit:7 RTS thr:off Fragment thr:off Power Management:off Link ...


3

The message “killing all remaining process...” comes from the shutdown script /etc/init.d/sendsigs, which is executed as part of the shutdown sequence through the symbolic link /etc/rc0.d/S20sendsigs. You can execute a custom script beforehand by linking it in /etc/rc0.d and /etc/rc6.d (0 for shutdown, 6 for reboot — don't ask) and giving it a priority less ...


3

From the live CD You seem to be able to get a working connection on the installation media, so here is one idea: Start the arch live CD and setup your network. Then mount your newly installed partition (for example on /mnt) and chroot into your system using # arch-chroot /mnt From there, you will be able to update pacman's database and install the ...


2

This looks to be an active bug in the rt2800usb driver. There's an open issue in the Fedora's bugzilla database here, titled: Bug 913631 - Slow wireless connection using rt2800usb driver (Asus USB-N13 dongle). TX status timeout The term TX refers to transfer (i.e. sending) and RX refers to receiver (i.e. receiving). I would say that it is something ...


2

I'd run lsusb with more debugging turned on to see what specifically the Linux system knows about the mouse. $ lsusb -vv Also take a look at the dmesg log to see if the mouse was detected correctly and if a driver and/or kernel module was assigned to it during start. For example in my dmesg log for my mouse: $ grep -i mouse /var/log/dmesg [ 1.668480] ...


2

First of all, if you want to use the init scripts, you have to put the wireless configuration into /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf (remember to leave it accessible only for root, since you'd leak the network password otherwise). However, unless this is a machine that for some reason uses the same wireless network all the time, you probably want something better ...


2

This would be possible if you could implement multi-path TCP on both your computer and the servers you're connecting to. (Or SCTP with "concurrent multi-path". There were patches for SCTP for Firefox at some point). I understand it's still in the research stage at the moment. Bonding won't work... the alternative name "link aggregation" might help ...


2

This blogspot entry has a guide for configuring a wireless network in ad-hoc mode. On the first machine, run these commands (fill in your own network information): ifconfig wlan0 down iwconfig wlan0 channel 4 iwconfig wlan0 mode ad-hoc iwconfig wlan0 essid 'fermilevel' iwconfig wlan0 key 1234567890 ifconfig wlan0 192.168.1.1 On the second machine: ...


2

You can almost certainly get a "full ISO install" of your distribution with all required packages for install and compilation already supplied; possibly (and even better), a live distribution. All that you need is a FAT-formatted USB key where you will download the Dropbox-supplied "officially unofficial" driver in source format from Windows 7. The key will ...


2

From your question: How can I test my Linux Wifi Access Point for high traffic and other heavy conditions? There is a service which named "chargen-stream", this service creates so heavy traffic. For testing your network you need 2 computers at least which one being server and chargen-stream lunch on it and you telnet to server (It's highly recommend to ...


2

I believe this is a known issue with the N 1000 cards. I have one in my laptop that has been plagued by this issue since day one. What we ended up doing was disabling the N side of this card since that is where the issue was isolated by myself and others. This blog post extensively covered the issue, titled: Debugging an Intermittently Dropping Intel ...


2

Option 1 Just edit /etc/network/interfaces and write: auto wlan0 iface wlan0 inet dhcp wpa-ssid {ssid} wpa-psk {password} After that write and close file and use command: sudo dhclient wlan0 Replace {ssid} and {password} with your respective WiFi SSID and password. Option 2 This is going to be more of a 1. ...


2

Many wireless card manufacturers support only Windows or Mac OS platforms. When developing drivers to integrate the hardware with the operating system, they focus solely on these platforms. This leaves Linux-based distros on their own. Some wireless vendors release the specs to the open source community so they can write drivers for Linux, while other ...


2

This is often the case with newer hardware. There is already an issue open about this in Fedora bug tracker and there are several workarounds listed there. See this issue: Bug 1027651 - Wireless driver for Broadcom BCM4352 802.11 Hybrid Wireless Controller 6.30.223.95. There is also mention of a driver hosted on Canonical, assuming it's the right version ...


2

After posted comment I went back to notes on this website Polish website I started to write in terminal: $ sudo brsaneconfig3 -a name=DCPJ315W model=DCP-J315W ip=192.168.2.101 $ brsaneconfig3 -q -> i got the list of all brother devices and the last was network device Devices on network 0 DCPJ315W "DCP-J315W" I:192.168.2.101 So next ...


2

You can refer to this wiki that explain a very simple and complete way of acheving what you want with iptables, This explain how to Nat your wifi interface behind you ppo interface. Edit 1: You can also make your two interface working as a bridge aka switch but it would probably be a bit more tricky, some info about that here


2

way to find the specific driver name lspci | grep -i network I am not sure whether that device is on the PCI or USB bus but you can try the following. Use lsusb or lspci to find information about the device Lookup that device for the corresponding module ("driver") Make sure that module is loaded and available with lsmod and modprobe Another Idea ...


2

Try a "softer" search pattern, there are 2 hw controllers for me Ethernet and Network, each hw device requires a driver. Here's mine. $ lspci -vvnn |grep -i net 03:00.0 Network controller [0280]: Atheros Communications Inc. AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express) [168c:002b] (rev 01) 07:00.0 Ethernet controller [0200]: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. ...


2

Ok, I looked about the internets and found this bug report. Apparently only mainline kernel has a mock up of the required drivers for the card to be detected and used. Realtek released the driver recently and that's why it isn't recognized nor any module loaded in stable kernels. I would recommend to install the mainline kernels and report any issue you ...


2

What cards do I have? You can find out what driver is being used per device like this using lshw: $ sudo lshw -c Network -sanitize *-network description: Ethernet interface product: 82577LM Gigabit Network Connection vendor: Intel Corporation physical id: 19 bus info: pci@0000:00:19.0 logical name: ...


2

A poor network connection. That's it. Also these results aren't inconsistent, they make perfect sense. Lets take a look at this section for example: 64 bytes from 192.168.1.9: icmp_seq=32 ttl=64 time=6811.810 ms 64 bytes from 192.168.1.9: icmp_seq=33 ttl=64 time=5817.897 ms 64 bytes from 192.168.1.9: icmp_seq=34 ttl=64 time=4820.810 ms 64 bytes from ...


2

make only reports the errors but they are in fact errors from your compiler (probably gcc): error: incompatible types when assigning to type ‘int’ from type ‘kuid_t’ Basically, your code is buggy or inappropriate for your platform but make functions correctly.


1

I'm not 100% sure about this answer. It can confirm access-point capabilities in some situations, but also seems to throw an error with other wifi dongles. With access-point wifi dongle attached (Ralink RT5370): $ iw list ... Supported interface modes: ... * AP With Realtek 8191SU dongle attached: $ iw list nl80211 not found.


1

A lot of Googling around, reading forums, and trial and error revealed that the problem is the driver. There is a newer driver with the flakiness bug fixed, but it doesn't compile on kernel >=3.8 because of a changed header file. Also the 20 dBm limit is hard coded into the driver even though the wireless card is capable of more. I fixed the compile bugs ...


1

Did you setup your passphrase with wpa_passphrase? e.g %> wpa_passphrase SSID passphrase network={ ssid="SSID" #psk="passphrase" psk=28964ba6ea8b8f3a0db1c4414b327da253d0af5d4f4adccec0f8abf5b05b10f8 } Otherwise wpa_supplicant -B -i [wireless device] -c /etc/wpa_supplicant/cli.conf won't work at all


1

This kind of problem is better divided into independent parts. In this case, circumventing ifupdown completely and doing all the steps manually - that is: run wpa_supplicant with an appropriate config file once connection is established, running dhcp client, To check how ifupdown runs wpa_supplicant - it has to pass it some sort of configuration in a ...


1

This is the order of things I'd try when debugging a flaky wireless device. Does a reboot resolve the issue? Try unloading the kernel drivers related to the wireless device. Something to the effect of the following: $ lsmod | grep iw iwlagn 209751 0 iwlcore 195714 1 iwlagn mac80211 229095 2 iwlagn,iwlcore ...



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