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3

Debian (or any other Linux distribution) will work without swap partition - just don't create one during installation. You can use swap file instead of partition. The swap file can be prepared by the following example commands: sudo fallocate -l 512MB /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile The first one creates a 512 MB file, the second one format it as swap ...


1

Mount the windows Partition. (If you can't mount install ntfsprogs-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm and ntfs-3g-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm) Run as root grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg


2

There is always a possibility of something going wrong with the files during or after transit, although in your case it might be more likely to be at the point things are written to tape. If the extra effort warrants it, I would calculate the MD5 or SHA1/SHA256 sums for the files on your Linux box and do that again on the Windows box on which the tape drive ...


0

Have you looked at the WMI Client package? Atomic looks to have a build for RedHat. # wget -q -O - http://www.atomicorp.com/installers/atomic | sh # yum install wmi # wmic -U username%password //servername "Select * from Win32_Process" Ref: http://www.krenger.ch/blog/wmi-commands-from-linux/


0

Unetbootin can make your external drive bootable with certain ISOs without formatting the drive - it keeps all the data and adds the MBR to it, along with some unpacked folders and files from the ISO. But be careful, it has an option to format the drive, tick that checkbox before pressing next. If you want to install Ubuntu in a normal way, to separate the ...


0

I guess you're trying to boot your PC from an ISO located on your hard drive. I've never done this before and I don't know if it will work, but EasyBCD can add an ISO image to the boot menu. You can then boot from it and install Linux. After that boot back into Windows and use EasyBCD to delete the ISO boot entry. See ...


0

Same exact thing happen to me as the original poster when I installed ubuntu. This helped me. Shut your computer down and boot to bios or uefi boot menu. You might see 4 options: ubuntu Ubuntu EFI Network 0 for IPv4 EFI Network 0 for IPv6 Select the Ubuntu with the capital U, thats what it was for me. One ubuntu is the actual ubuntu and the other is ...


0

GRUB doesn't work with Windows for me either (I get some error message I can't remember), on my Acer laptop. I use the F12 key to bring up an EFI boot menu (this was disabled by default; I had to enable it in the firmware a.k.a. 'system setup' in GRUB). I've seen another report as well. Many EFI systems will have some equivalent (although some do not, or ...


1

Reinstall the CentOS bootloader (whether it is LILO or GRUB). The bootloader installer should recognize OSes in your machine and automatically show you OS choices in booting time. CMIIW.


0

The System Setup is just a second name of BIOS setup. When you are in BIOS you see words in the title in there 'BIOS Setup UtilityorCMOS setup utilty` so it is all the same - BIOS, and it doesn't mean an installation of any OS. If you don't like names in GRUB menu you can change them, you would need to operate via /etc/grub.d/40_custom and update-grub which ...


1

Ubuntu is capable of reading and writing files stored on Windows formatted partitions. These partitions are normally formatted with NTFS, but are sometimes formatted with FAT32. You will also see FAT16 on other devices. General Considerations Ubuntu will show files and folders in NTFS/FAT32 filesystems which are hidden in Windows. Consequently, important ...


0

As far as I'm aware, from my own experiences, yes it is normal for Grub to chain link to the Windows Boot Manager. Basically, it is the boot-loader that starts Windows, like Grub is the boot-loader that starts Ubuntu. The reason it is listed like that is because rather than starting Windows by itself, it chains itself to the Windows boot-loader so it'll do ...


6

Linux can read (and write) to many filesystems, including ntfs, which is likely how your windows partitions are formatted. Many OS installers (including Ubuntu apparently) will scan your disks for any partitions that Linux knows how to mount, and set those up to be mounted at boot, which is why you can access them.


3

as I mentioned in the comment: as Wikipedia link mention: In Windows NT operating systems, a Windows service is a computer program that operates in the background.[1] It is similar in concept to a Unix daemon. A daemon is a type of program on Unix-like operating systems that runs unobtrusively in the background, rather than under the direct control of a ...


0

On Unix: nc -l 192.168.1.10 32849 On Windows: telnet 192.168.1.10 32849 Where 32849 is an arbitrary port allowed in firewall rules, and the IP is the listening IP of the Unix machine. nc is the netcat utility.


0

It is pretty simple , first you have to locate the grub.cfg file, in Ubuntu it will be under /boot/grub/grub.cfg, make sure you take a back up of this file before editing. Open the file with any text editor of your choice in sudo mode, eg sudo vi path/grug.cfg In this file there will be menu entries , which represents each item in the boot menu. Find the ...


0

There is an interesting tool which allows you to execute windows commands from Linux, the name is winexe. So you can send a message from the same machine to the console just typing: winexe -U domain/user%password --interactive=1 //WindowsMachine "msg console \"Your message goes here.\"" As you can see noleti's answer is much simpler but with winexe you can ...


1

How about NET SEND {name1 | * | /DOMAIN[:name] | /USERS} message on the windows machine, and echo "message" | smbclient -M name2 on the linux box? name1 and name2 are the netbios names of the machines.


3

If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


0

You can follow the steps given in Linux Mint itself. Linux Mint tutorials.


0

-You forgot to add 'avaliable' option try adding this option in your configuration to stay this way! [Backup] comment = USB Share path = /mnt/disk1 avaliable = yes browseable = yes public = yes writeable = Yes create mask = 0777 directory mask = 0777 and check the recording options and access the [Homes] ...


2

First see if the interface got a IP address, using ip addr show or ifconfig # ip addr show ... 3: wlp3s0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000 link/ether 00:24:d7:ae:dc:64 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff inet 10.0.0.8/24 brd 10.0.0.255 scope global dynamic wlp3s0 valid_lft 3596sec preferred_lft ...


0

I had this same issue. Linux Samba server settings have a create mask where you can set the default create permissions. There is a force user setting where you can force created files to always be the same user. Settings location in ubuntu: /etc/samba/smb.conf If your permissions are changing even though you are just editing the file this could be ...


0

What about xming? It is a x window manager for windows, that way you can be running programs on your Aix machine and display them on your windows box. That way you can continue with your work as if you were in Aix, use vi or whatever IDE you might like code::blocks or whatever. But if you are only going to use vi, gcc or the likes, with a simple ssh session ...


0

I'd suggest adding it to your /etc/fstab, so it's online as soon as you boot. Mine has a (long) line reading: //1.2.3.4/share_name/ /media/mount_point cifs uid=1000,guid=1000,rw,credentials=/etc/cifspasswd 0 0 The first field is the address and share name. The second field is the mount point on your system (the folder must exist). cifs is ...


4

Assuming a recent Linux, do this: $ mount -t cifs //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt Which will mount it at /mnt. You will need sufficient privilege (or be root). If you need to add credentials, try: $ mount -t cifs -o username=myuser,password=mypass //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt You may need to install a package from your ...


1

I'm not really sure that this is a correct place to ask such questions. But I assume that your partition numbering has changed when you created another partition for Linux therefore you'd need to change windows bootloader configuration. The link provided says: Immediately Reboot Windows After Shrinking Partition After shrinking the Windows ...


20

"Everything is a file" is a bit glib. "Everything appears somewhere in the filesystem" is closer to the mark, and even then, it's more an ideal than a law of system design. For example, Unix domain sockets are not files, but they do appear in the filesystem. You can ls -l a domain socket to display its attributes, cat data to/from one, modify its access ...


0

Explain that to be stored after power-offs, everything needs a place to record stuff and have that information separated and not mixed in with other programs information and settings. Memory is lost when you shutdown so unless it is recorded on an external device such as a cd recorder, there must be a physical 'drive' with the ability to store files and ...


0

If you consider Linux as the English Language, the file systems are the alphabets which are basically the foundation blocks for the English language. From wiki page of File system, In computing, a file system (or filesystem) is used to control how data is stored and retrieved. Without a file system, information placed in a storage area would be one ...


5

Okay, I actually feel confident after doing some reading that using dd will do what you want. According to this website you can use dd to create an image of your drive, which is what you want to do. Backing up your system: So begin by booting from your live disk. Switch to root mode if you are not root already. su root, or sudo su root Check that no ...


2

Parted Magic is very useful, also can do this with a bootable USB or DVD using PartImage on the System Rescue CD (it even comes with the USB boot setup - instructions on the site there). Personally though, can't go wrong with the good ol' Ghost 8 (found on older versions of Hiren's Boot CD but looks like they use a new G4L - Ghost 4 Linux now but try it out ...


0

Please show us errors in these logs: /var/log/secure & /var/log/samba Also you can show iptables open ports.


0

The Arch Linux Beginners Guide is great source for the general installation procedure: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide Backup! Just in case something gets wrong, I always find it very convenient to have a full backup of the disc to restore. I would suggest to boot into the Arch Linux Live system and connect and mount a portable HDD ...


1

Boot from your Windows DVD. If you bought Windows separately from your computer, then this is the DVD you bought. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, then the DVD most likely came in the box. If it did not, contact your manufacturer to see if they will give you one. Once you have booted the DVD, find the option that says something like "repair ...


1

I don't think there's a way of bypassing GRUB2 (or any other Linux bootloader) via EasyBCD. Most probably EasyBCD is not a universal bootloader and it works by chain loading into GRUB2. Your best bet is to try and make GRUB2 timeout on the Ubuntu entry immediately as Jonyburd's answer is suggesting. I believe you should look into why it failed.


2

Try changing the values that are in etc/default/grub to look like these: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" Then run sudo update-grub.


3

GUI applications under Linux require that a X server be available to drive a system's displays/monitors. Part of the responsibility of the X server is to accept/deny connections from applications that require access to the display/monitor. In your case you're running PuTTY on Windows so there is no X server to provide access for these GUI applications, so ...


0

You need to install X server on your windows PC to be able to see the output. Here is a link for one of the X Server software. after installing this then you can set your DISPLAY option to output to your windows PC example to set the display option : export DISPLAY=${XSERVER}:0.0


1

You said: "Now it's unable to open a PDF document in putty". Was it ever able to open the pdf file in the first place, or you are trying this for the first time? As per the error, I can see that you don't have a valid display. Run the following commands to see if you have an X server (and proper display) running: ps -e | grep X echo $DISPLAY If no ...


0

Here is the workaround I've been using. I have not experienced any hangs so far, after mounting the cifs share for several hours. The idea is simply to periodically write to a file on the mounted subtree. This seems to maintain things alive on both ends. #!/bin/sh -x mountpoint="/home/user/mount3/mount" if mount|grep ${mountpoint}; then echo lazy ...



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