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Try checking "Allow unmapped user Unix access". This may change things if the Windows side doesn't know about the osmc account. See https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh509017%28v=ws.10%29.aspx


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Post 80 is typically closed by default on OSX. When you used Safari on your Mac and hit the IIS web browser, OSX was using the loop back interface. Try to connect to port 80 on another box using something like the following: nc -z -w1 192.168.x.x 80 This will let you know if the port is open. If it is closed you will need to open it to allow requests to ...


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rsync's -a option is actually an alias for (according to the manpage) -rlptgoD. The -p in that list is for "preserve permissions"; i.e., rsync will do stat() on the source file and copy the permission bits to the destination file. Since windows doesn't have any unix permissions, cygwin has to come up with an approximation, which necessarily is somewhat ...


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If this is your setup, all you need to do is boot into Linux and let it know you have a new OS installed. So, keep grub where it is, on /dev/sda, boot into your Linux system and run: sudo update-grub That will generate output similar to this: Generating grub configuration file ... Found background image: /usr/share/images/desktop-base/desktop-grub.png ...


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Like the error message notes, it's often caused by Windows's Hybrid Boot(tm) aka fast startup. It's sort of midway between hibernation and normal shutdown and often leaves drives dirty. Disable it if you run into this problem again.


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Further to Basile's answer, once you are able to successfully mount the ntfs partition you may need a driver such as ntfs-3g in order to be able to write/copy data from it.


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As I commented, the (NTFS) file system was dirty, as the error message was saying. So checking it (on Windows) with a chkdsk command (or the Windows equivalent of fsck) -to clean it- then rebooting Linux could be enough. If you absolutely need Windows with some data shared with Linux, you could consider using an Ext4 (or Ext3) file system (shared with ...


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On linux you can define very accurate routing tables that allow you to be connected with several VPN toghether. I had this problem once, and was solved here. The problem I see in your case is mainly: "how to use windows as a router?". And probably this is not the best forum where to ask such a question... Anyway, there are a couple of advices that I ...


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Normally not - once a machine (virtual or not) connects to a VPN it behaves as if it is physically connected to that VPN, it is no longer accessible from and can no longer access other machines on the local network (unless conections between the local network machines and any other machine inside the VPN is possible, which kinda defeats the whole purpose of ...


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This happens when a file contains \r\n as a line terminator instead of \n, since \r is a C0 control code meaning "go to the beginning of the current line". To fix, run dos2unix foo.py. Example session: ben@joyplim /tmp/cr % echo '#!/usr/bin/env python' > foo.py ben@joyplim /tmp/cr % chmod +x foo.py ben@joyplim /tmp/cr % ./foo.py ben@joyplim /tmp/cr % ...


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Could it be a file permission issue? $ chmod +x foo.py If you don't specifically indicate you wish to maintain then they are stripped/altered by most ftp clients.


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The simple way is to do it by hand. Lets start with the assumption that you have at your disposal a linux machine with an available usb port and that you have a blank usb thumb drive (or one that you don't mind wiping). You can use an existing thumb drive distro for your setup distro. Insert but do not mount the thumb drive. Partition it placing the fat ...


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The key to the issue is that Windows will only read the first partition on a removable drive, and a bootable FAT32 can only use (addressable space) 4G. So the solution given here: Multiple Partitions on 64GB USB drive (Windows) was to change the USB registration to tell Windows that it is a fixed drive, and then it would access the other partition as well. ...


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You can have Samba normalize everything the clients send it, see man smb.conf for things like: create mask = 0775 force create mode = 0660 directory mask = 2775 force directory mode = 2771


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First of all, with only those permissions you don't need ACL. ACL is for more fine grained permissions than user, group and others. But to answer your question my guess is that the file created by Linux gets its permission from your users umask setting, probably the same permission you would get when creating a file in any other directory. The Windows ...


1

The solution was to download VirtualBox and to use it to install and run CentOS 7 from within Windows 8.1. This is infinitely more convenient than the dual boot setup. I did have to go into the BIOS settings of the PC and enable "Virtualization Features" before the machine allowed CentOS 7 to install. There were problems involved in the dual boot ...


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Take a look at this: Create a Larger than 4GB Casper Partition, and How to resize casper-rw Images in Windows. The tutorials are old for ubuntu, but I think it can be used for any Linux distros. The reason why a separate partition must be created is because the USB creator only makes one partition by default (FAT32 filesystem). Onto that partition it copies ...


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It seems that your HD is really dying, that's why you have this "Input/output error" when cp is trying to read the file. You could run 'dmesg' and if you see lines with 'I/O errors', that would confirm the problem with your HD.


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Part 1 Download Refind, and see the question I asked recently dealing with some of the issues you'll face. Assuming you're using Windows 8.1, you'll want to use the Refind CD-R Image. Be sure to extract the ISO from the zip file, and mount it in Windows 8.1. Note: You need not burn the image as Windows 8.1 supports mounting ISO files now like Linux has ...


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Windows is hibernated, refused to mount Chances are that Windows really is hibernated. Windows does this automatically when you tell it to shutdown normally. The benefit is that you get a faster apparent start-up time. To shutdown Windows without hybernating, issue the following at a command-prompt (in Windows): shutdown /s You might also want ...


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I think all is up side down!!!! It is; but not in the way that you think. Your system is operating perfectly fine, where the definition of "perfectly fine" is "the same way that Windows is doing things on your machine". For some people, that's good and desirable. For others it is, indeed, all upside down; and not the way that Unices and Linux were ...


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If you look farther down in the post you cite, you'll see that commenting out that line was not a fix, and the situation cited there seems to be yours as well. The system time is stored in UTC and your time zone is COT or COT5 and that accounts for the 5 hour discrepency.


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This is a known bug: https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=776746 Now I can sum up the conclution of this bug: 1) It won't be fixed in Jessie although it also influences wheezy; 2) For developers: Tigervnc should be included in Debian 9 and replace tightvnc, if not, this issue won't be fixed in Debian 9; probably should ...


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It could be because of the fast reboot feature enabled by default in recent Windows, including Windows 8. From ntfs-3g man page: Moreover, the fast restart feature available on recent Windows systems has to be disabled. This can be achieved by issuing as an Administrator the Windows command which disables both hibernation and fast restarting ...



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