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So I ended up installing LILO as bootloader which works just fine. It kinda confirms the theory that there might be something wrong with the newer versions of GRUB. Here are the install instructions: First remove GRUB bootloader: sudo pacman -Rsn grub For installing packages that are not listed in the arch repo by default we need development tools: ...


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It's a security policy of the modern Samba. Fix by adding this line to your /etc/samba/smb.conf: acl allow execute always = True Source: Samba's Wiki.


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I've had to deal with this a lot, and I used to teach a few classes where students needed to work from Windows machines. I'll describe two methods, and you decide what you like best. Also, warning: I am not a Windows user, I just provide support for them when they need to work with Unix :). Use WinSCP (http://winscp.net/eng/download.php) WinSCP is just a ...


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In similar cases, I've used WinSCP. It's a Windows SCP client that allows you to browse the Linux file system graphically and scp files back and forth between the 2 machines. Available here : http://winscp.net/eng/index.php


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You're doing this the very hardest way, but here you go: Get the wonderful pscp program. I'm not a Windows person at all so all I can tell you is put pscp.exe in your %path%. On the Windows machine, change directory to C:\Users\MyUser\Downloads On the Windows machine: pscp test.c odroid:test/ You'll probably have to type in your Ubuntu password. On the ...


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I don't think this likely has anything to do with the mounting. Are you sure the CR characters are there originally in the file? Assuming they are not, you can use unix2dos to add them, though I haven't actually verified that exists for AIX. You could use sed like sed -i -e 's/\n/\r\n/g' <file> if you don't have unix2dos available. The -i flag ...


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It doesn’t matter how you mounted the partition. Every byte of every file will be transferred. If your files do not have carriage returns after the transfer, then they didn’t have them before. I don’t know what command to run on AIX to check the encoding of your files, but you could just look at them in a binary editor and see if the lines are terminated ...


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1) Download and install Samba: apt-get install samba samba-common 2) Backup samba.conf: cp /etc/samba/smb.conf /etc/samba/smb.conf.bak 3) Edit samba.conf: nano /etc/samba/smb.conf Replace all with and edit it to your wishes: [global] workgroup = arbeitsgruppe server string = %h server (Samba %v) log file = ...


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The problem is solved by changing Windows Firewall settings in Guest OS (Windows), and adding an exception for port 80 to the list.


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So /var/www/public_html is actually as Windows folder, but /var/www/data is not?  You're trying to create a symbolic link from a Windows directory into a Ubuntu directory in a virtual machine.  There's no way that Windows can support an object like that.


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try this solution it may fix your issue: bootable usb using cmd


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Platform choice is probably the big criteria. You get access to a lot more file systems than on Windows. You also have access to a more exhaustive set of tunables, should you be interested in going that route. Some people also prefer the Linux firewall to the Windows one. There are also a lot of widely used tools in the Linux world that have niche ...


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I guess you have GPT table and Kali can't manage them while installation. If you use parted /dev/sda print you'd see all of your partitions. To fix it, you should wait Kali fixes its installer (or maybe there are some patch/tricks available, I don't know Kali)


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No, there isn't. Strictly speaking, whenever any Linux distribution calls itself a server edition, it's marketing. A distribution can include software that's more suited to server use in its repositories but at the end of the day, it's Linux and if you really wanted to you could install Frogatto on SLES although you might have to compile it from source or ...


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In Non-UEFI machines, we can use GRUB2 to make USB stick bootable. Then, we can use 'ntldr' command in the GRUB2 to boot Windows from USB. menuentry 'Install Windows 8' { ntldr /bootmgr } See complete answer at my blog Creating a bootable windows USB from Linux


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Try running sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY, where sdXY is the name of your device.


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Actually if you just leave an unallocated space and 3 primary partitions(1 media 1windows system and 1 windows boot) and then try to install debian and choose guided mode(use 1st largest free space) then it will automatically create 2 logical volumes(1 swap and 1 where all your system files and home folder resides) within an extended primary partition. So ...



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