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22

"Everything is a file" is a bit glib. "Everything appears somewhere in the filesystem" is closer to the mark, and even then, it's more an ideal than a law of system design. For example, Unix domain sockets are not files, but they do appear in the filesystem. You can ls -l a domain socket to display its attributes, cat data to/from one, modify its access ...


7

A modern computer contains hundreds of parts that can be turned on and off or clocked faster or slower independently. The granularity is smaller than visible chips, smaller even than cores. A large part of power saving consists on turning parts on and off at the best time. Each part should be turned off when not in use, but only if it's going to remain ...


7

This can be done by installing Cygwin and an openssh server on your Windows machine. Cygwin will come with bash, which can run your script, and openssh can be installed under Cygwin, and will allow you to login to the Windows machine remotely. Before logging in, you can transfer your script to the Windows machine using scp, and then run it directly with ssh. ...


7

os-prober (used by update-grub) requires the following kernel features to detect the Windows 8 boot loader. Device Drivers -> Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM) (CONFIG_MD) -> Device mapper support (CONFIG_BLK_DEV_DM) File Systems -> FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace) support (CONFIG_FUSE_FS) DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems -> NTFS file system support ...


7

The problem with the script is that when copying a file from another system like Windows, it adds a newline \n and a carriage return \r\n. For more about line feeds see newline entry on wikipedia. To demonstrate the issue I've uploaded short fragment here which explains how to solve the problem. In short: Use tr to remove those weird line endings tr -d ...


6

as I mentioned in the comment: as Wikipedia link mention: In Windows NT operating systems, a Windows service is a computer program that operates in the background.[1] It is similar in concept to a Unix daemon. A daemon is a type of program on Unix-like operating systems that runs unobtrusively in the background, rather than under the direct control of a ...


6

Linux can read (and write) to many filesystems, including ntfs, which is likely how your windows partitions are formatted. Many OS installers (including Ubuntu apparently) will scan your disks for any partitions that Linux knows how to mount, and set those up to be mounted at boot, which is why you can access them.


5

I'm going use the term BIOS below when referring to concepts that are the same for both newer UEFI systems and traditional BIOS systems, since while this is a UEFI oriented question, talking about the "BIOS" jibes better with, e.g., GRUB documentation, and "BIOS/UEFI" is too clunky. GRUB (actually, GRUB 2 -- this is often used ambiguously) is the bootloader ...


5

Okay, I actually feel confident after doing some reading that using dd will do what you want. According to this website you can use dd to create an image of your drive, which is what you want to do. Backing up your system: So begin by booting from your live disk. Switch to root mode if you are not root already. su root, or sudo su root Check that no ...


4

Yes Samba is what you're looking for to handle file sharing. For the GPOS I believe you can use something like Likewise to authenticate Linux users into the AD, see this article: Authenticating Active Directory users on Linux with Likewise Open and this one titled: Likewise Open - Ubuntu Documentation. NOTE: I believe the LikeWise products were acquired by ...


4

As @graeme has astutely pointed out since you have the script in both forms on the server you could perform a simple diff to determine what's different between the working version and the problematic version. $ diff working.sh broken.sh You can also do a side-by-side diff like this: $ diff -y working.sh broken.sh If the script isn't working because of ...


4

I would be willing to bet that the problem is related to line endings. You're probably going through a non-*nix machine somewhere along the line. I also ran into a problem once where apache (running on Linux) was adding windows style line endings to uploaded text files so you might be seeing something similar. To test, take the file you downloaded and pass ...


4

If you squint, VM security looks a lot like LAN host security. It's just another machine on the network, with the same sort of attendant risks. If you would willingly put a Windows 7 host on the LAN, you shouldn't be especially worried about putting a Windows 7 VM on the VM host. It is possible to lock a VM down to the point where it is less dangerous to ...


4

Assuming a recent Linux, do this: $ mount -t cifs //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt Which will mount it at /mnt. You will need sufficient privilege (or be root). If you need to add credentials, try: $ mount -t cifs -o username=myuser,password=mypass //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt You may need to install a package from your ...


4

If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


4

Debian (or any other Linux distribution) will work without swap partition - just don't create one during installation. You can use swap file instead of partition. The swap file can be prepared by the following example commands: sudo fallocate -l 512MB /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile The first one creates a 512 MB file, the second one format it as swap ...


4

Q#1: I see many connections like when I use netstat, are they all to the internet? No not all connections listed in the output of netstat are to the internet. Many of these so-called connections are to files that are in use on your system. These are special files, one of which, is called a socket. A socket file allows an application to "talk" to ...


4

I would encourage you not to do this. Either host a SVN server on Windows or on Linux and access the server using svn+ssh protocol. Do not try and develop some kludged method for accessing your SVN repositories. There are a number of issues you're going to run into that are SVN and SQLite related that you'll run into that require various mounting options ...


4

The obvious answer is this is happening because grub can not find the windows boot loader. The less obvious answer is because the grub configuration file does not properly specify the root for the windows bootloader. The default operation seems to leave that line out. While it would be somewhat complicated to fix the default Windows Bootloader, the ...


3

As long as you steer clear of Windows "system files" you should be safe enough. If you're worried about endangering your Windows installation and only need read access to your Windows partition from Ubuntu, you can always mount the Windows partition read-only. As root, open the file /etc/fstab and look for the line responsible for mounting your Windows ...


3

The issue is resolved. As it turns out, the problem is due to user hitting the hard quota limit. Increasing the quota limit solved the problem.


3

First, make sure you have cleanly shutdown windows and have not hibernated it. According to the ntfs-3g manual, there is an option that allows you to do this: remove_hiberfile Unlike in case of read-only mount, the read-write mount is denied if the NTFS volume is hibernated. One needs either to resume Windows ...


3

Here's my basic rule of thumb when choosing an OS for... well, pretty much anything, really. What will run on it? Are there any specific applications requiring any specific OS, that can't be replaced with something else? If so, choose what supports the things you need. What support structure is needed? Do you need to have a support organization that you ...


3

If you have a second machine where you can install your Distribution Of Choice (DOC) or have it installed in a VM, and if Ubuntu actually would run on that laptop you can do the following. Before playing around with the disc, consider taking it out of the laptop, hooking it up to another system and make a full dump of the disk (not of partitions), so in ...


3

There is a project called WINE that will allow you to run some Windows software under Linux. It works surprisingly well, I'm actually using it to run the Adobe Digital Edition software to read ebooks from my local library and it works near flawlessly, as far as I can tell. WINE is typically in your distributions repositories so I would suggest using your ...


3

VirtualBox shared folders are still not suppported on FreeBSD. A FreeBSD ports committer has confirmed this on the FreeBSD mailing lists as of (2014-06-24): Shared Folders for FreeBSD guests are not supported yet [...] There is some draft code and a kernel module for it but it's not working yet. If you want to follow the state of the port, please ...


3

Is there something inherent to Linux operating systems that makes them poor managers of battery power by default? No [but see my first comment below]. Note it is used on a wide range of low power devices where it is not even possible to run Windows. The battery can't be magically drained, so if it is happening at an unusual rate, it could be that you ...


3

Microsoft provides VMs with various versions of IE at modern.ie for website testing. You can use VirtualBox to run these on Linux. Currently, they're offering these Internet Explorer – Windows versions: IE6 – XP IE8 – XP IE7 – Vista IE8 – Win7 IE9 – Win7 IE10 – Win7 IE11 – Win7 IE10 – Win8 IE11 – Win8.1


3

They measure the sizes differently by default. Under Linux, you can specify the --si parameter (which uses powers of 1000 not 1024) with df and du to get numbers that match up with how Windows calculates the sizes. Compare $ df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 119G 29G 89G 25% / versus $ df --si Filesystem ...


3

dd doesn't "pack" anything. It just literally copies. For example: dd if=/path/sometextfile.txt of=whatever.file "whatever.file" will be identical to "sometextfile.txt". However, dd can be used to copy directly from the block layer of a device: dd if=/dev/sda1 of=disk.img In which case you again have a literal copy. Presuming they are done ...



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