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25

"Everything is a file" is a bit glib. "Everything appears somewhere in the filesystem" is closer to the mark, and even then, it's more an ideal than a law of system design. For example, Unix domain sockets are not files, but they do appear in the filesystem. You can ls -l a domain socket to display its attributes, cat data to/from one, modify its access ...


8

as I mentioned in the comment: as Wikipedia link mention: In Windows NT operating systems, a Windows service is a computer program that operates in the background.[1] It is similar in concept to a Unix daemon. A daemon is a type of program on Unix-like operating systems that runs unobtrusively in the background, rather than under the direct control of a ...


7

os-prober (used by update-grub) requires the following kernel features to detect the Windows 8 boot loader. Device Drivers -> Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM) (CONFIG_MD) -> Device mapper support (CONFIG_BLK_DEV_DM) File Systems -> FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace) support (CONFIG_FUSE_FS) DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems -> NTFS file system support ...


7

The problem with the script is that when copying a file from another system like Windows, it adds a newline \n and a carriage return \r\n. For more about line feeds see newline entry on wikipedia. To demonstrate the issue I've uploaded short fragment here which explains how to solve the problem. In short: Use tr to remove those weird line endings tr -d ...


6

Linux can read (and write) to many filesystems, including ntfs, which is likely how your windows partitions are formatted. Many OS installers (including Ubuntu apparently) will scan your disks for any partitions that Linux knows how to mount, and set those up to be mounted at boot, which is why you can access them.


6

1) Download and install Samba: apt-get install samba samba-common 2) Backup samba.conf: cp /etc/samba/smb.conf /etc/samba/smb.conf.bak 3) Edit samba.conf: nano /etc/samba/smb.conf Replace all with and edit it to your wishes: [global] workgroup = arbeitsgruppe server string = %h server (Samba %v) log file = ...


6

Ah, the famous conundrum "which Linux distro to install". The best thing would be to install the same distro the friends of your friend use, so he can get help when he needs. If he knows nobody using Linux around him, the simplest and user-friendlier distro is probably Ubuntu. It has a large user base and good support.


5

Edit smb.conf [global] unix extensions = no [share] follow symlinks = yes wide links = yes


5

Okay, I actually feel confident after doing some reading that using dd will do what you want. According to this website you can use dd to create an image of your drive, which is what you want to do. Backing up your system: So begin by booting from your live disk. Switch to root mode if you are not root already. su root, or sudo su root Check that no ...


5

As @Celeo shared I think you chances are small. What you should have done before installation are two things :- a. Make a backup of the content on the D drive before doing that. b. Make D partition smaller and then make E which is free, blank and has nothing. Then when you install choose E to install Ubuntu or whichever GNU/Linux distribution you want to ...


4

Assuming a recent Linux, do this: $ mount -t cifs //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt Which will mount it at /mnt. You will need sufficient privilege (or be root). If you need to add credentials, try: $ mount -t cifs -o username=myuser,password=mypass //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt You may need to install a package from your ...


4

If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


4

Q#1: I see many connections like when I use netstat, are they all to the internet? No not all connections listed in the output of netstat are to the internet. Many of these so-called connections are to files that are in use on your system. These are special files, one of which, is called a socket. A socket file allows an application to "talk" to ...


4

I would encourage you not to do this. Either host a SVN server on Windows or on Linux and access the server using svn+ssh protocol. Do not try and develop some kludged method for accessing your SVN repositories. There are a number of issues you're going to run into that are SVN and SQLite related that you'll run into that require various mounting options ...


4

The obvious answer is this is happening because grub can not find the windows boot loader. The less obvious answer is because the grub configuration file does not properly specify the root for the windows bootloader. The default operation seems to leave that line out. While it would be somewhat complicated to fix the default Windows Bootloader, the ...


3

VirtualBox shared folders are still not suppported on FreeBSD. A FreeBSD ports committer has confirmed this on the FreeBSD mailing lists as of (2014-06-24): Shared Folders for FreeBSD guests are not supported yet [...] There is some draft code and a kernel module for it but it's not working yet. If you want to follow the state of the port, please ...


3

Windows adds characters to files. If you want to see them, open the file in an editor on Linux such as vi and look at the end of the line. You'll see at the end of each line ^M If you run dos2unix on the source file, then it will convert it to a format that Linux is happy with. dos2unix should be in /usr/bin. So: dos2unix file_downloaded > ...


3

GUI applications under Linux require that a X server be available to drive a system's displays/monitors. Part of the responsibility of the X server is to accept/deny connections from applications that require access to the display/monitor. In your case you're running PuTTY on Windows so there is no X server to provide access for these GUI applications, so ...


3

I've never tried with these specific RAID technologies but it's been my experience that it's best to operate at the filesystem level when attempting to migrate data from one physical implementation of RAID to another. What do I mean by this? I mean that I would get another set of disks and move my content from the 1st RAID to a intermediate location (some ...


3

A WUBI setup is... Easier to install (on older systems - UEFI users sometimes have issues) Doesn't require a new bootloader (which Windows can munch) Doesn't require repartitioning your Windows drives to make room Is slower than native because it's one step removed from hardware Can still get munched by Windows. Windows will ultimately do whatever Windows ...


3

This will not work as it unlikely that your hosts mapped in filesystem (i.e. Windows C: drive, so most likely NTFS) supports the full range of permission bits that Linux git expects. In a similar situation I have exported a Linux directory via Samba and used that from Windows and Linux without problems. This however has the disadvantage that you cannot ...


3

Linux doesn't have an exact equivalent of “bypass traverse checking”. It uses other means to achieve the same policies. Traditionally, a user's home directory is publicly readable. Users can create subdirectories for private files, and make them private. A nice property of Unix permissions (including modern ACL schemes) is that if any component of a path is ...


3

To some extent: In the Unix permission model, the r bit on a directory allows listing its content, and the x bits allows getting a handle to the directory. A handle allows you to reference files and directories in that directory if you know their name, and using them is subject to the permissions on the inode of that object. So for the scenario you ...


3

It turns out that I needed to run the following: sudo update-grub This updated my /boot/grub/grub.cfg file and got rid of the windows 7 option.


3

I can't say that my own 19 year experience of running Linux supports your assertion that windows boots more stably, but here are some things that will effect what you are seeing: Filesystem caching Linux uses caching on all filesystems unless told otherwise. This improves speed and response times for disk reads and writes by userspace programs, as they ...


3

You can use X forwarding on Windows as well; all you need is an X server (such as Xming) and an SSH client (such as PuTTY). Xming includes documentation explaining how to go about things; basically, you enable X forwarding in PuTTY, start the X server on your Windows machine, SSH to the Linux machine and run your Java application. You might find that rather ...


2

There are a list of web browsers that use Trident shell as listed in the wiki page here. Apparently, Tencent has support for Linux and it uses trident shell. Tencent QQ provides total solution for Internet-based instant messaging (IM) platform. It supports comprehensive basic online communication functions, including text messaging, video and voice ...


2

Try changing the values that are in etc/default/grub to look like these: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" Then run sudo update-grub.


2

Parted Magic is very useful, also can do this with a bootable USB or DVD using PartImage on the System Rescue CD (it even comes with the USB boot setup - instructions on the site there). Personally though, can't go wrong with the good ol' Ghost 8 (found on older versions of Hiren's Boot CD but looks like they use a new G4L - Ghost 4 Linux now but try it out ...



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