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20

"Everything is a file" is a bit glib. "Everything appears somewhere in the filesystem" is closer to the mark, and even then, it's more an ideal than a law of system design. For example, Unix domain sockets are not files, but they do appear in the filesystem. You can ls -l a domain socket to display its attributes, cat data to/from one, modify its access ...


6

Linux can read (and write) to many filesystems, including ntfs, which is likely how your windows partitions are formatted. Many OS installers (including Ubuntu apparently) will scan your disks for any partitions that Linux knows how to mount, and set those up to be mounted at boot, which is why you can access them.


5

Okay, I actually feel confident after doing some reading that using dd will do what you want. According to this website you can use dd to create an image of your drive, which is what you want to do. Backing up your system: So begin by booting from your live disk. Switch to root mode if you are not root already. su root, or sudo su root Check that no ...


4

Assuming a recent Linux, do this: $ mount -t cifs //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt Which will mount it at /mnt. You will need sufficient privilege (or be root). If you need to add credentials, try: $ mount -t cifs -o username=myuser,password=mypass //bioinf-filesrv2.mycompany.fr/cluster15 /mnt You may need to install a package from your ...


3

Debian (or any other Linux distribution) will work without swap partition - just don't create one during installation. You can use swap file instead of partition. The swap file can be prepared by the following example commands: sudo fallocate -l 512MB /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile The first one creates a 512 MB file, the second one format it as swap ...


3

as I mentioned in the comment: as Wikipedia link mention: In Windows NT operating systems, a Windows service is a computer program that operates in the background.[1] It is similar in concept to a Unix daemon. A daemon is a type of program on Unix-like operating systems that runs unobtrusively in the background, rather than under the direct control of a ...


3

If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


3

GUI applications under Linux require that a X server be available to drive a system's displays/monitors. Part of the responsibility of the X server is to accept/deny connections from applications that require access to the display/monitor. In your case you're running PuTTY on Windows so there is no X server to provide access for these GUI applications, so ...


2

Parted Magic is very useful, also can do this with a bootable USB or DVD using PartImage on the System Rescue CD (it even comes with the USB boot setup - instructions on the site there). Personally though, can't go wrong with the good ol' Ghost 8 (found on older versions of Hiren's Boot CD but looks like they use a new G4L - Ghost 4 Linux now but try it out ...


2

First see if the interface got a IP address, using ip addr show or ifconfig # ip addr show ... 3: wlp3s0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000 link/ether 00:24:d7:ae:dc:64 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff inet 10.0.0.8/24 brd 10.0.0.255 scope global dynamic wlp3s0 valid_lft 3596sec preferred_lft ...


2

Try changing the values that are in etc/default/grub to look like these: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" Then run sudo update-grub.


2

There is always a possibility of something going wrong with the files during or after transit, although in your case it might be more likely to be at the point things are written to tape. If the extra effort warrants it, I would calculate the MD5 or SHA1/SHA256 sums for the files on your Linux box and do that again on the Windows box on which the tape drive ...


1

Ubuntu is capable of reading and writing files stored on Windows formatted partitions. These partitions are normally formatted with NTFS, but are sometimes formatted with FAT32. You will also see FAT16 on other devices. General Considerations Ubuntu will show files and folders in NTFS/FAT32 filesystems which are hidden in Windows. Consequently, important ...


1

How about NET SEND {name1 | * | /DOMAIN[:name] | /USERS} message on the windows machine, and echo "message" | smbclient -M name2 on the linux box? name1 and name2 are the netbios names of the machines.


1

I'm not really sure that this is a correct place to ask such questions. But I assume that your partition numbering has changed when you created another partition for Linux therefore you'd need to change windows bootloader configuration. The link provided says: Immediately Reboot Windows After Shrinking Partition After shrinking the Windows ...


1

You said: "Now it's unable to open a PDF document in putty". Was it ever able to open the pdf file in the first place, or you are trying this for the first time? As per the error, I can see that you don't have a valid display. Run the following commands to see if you have an X server (and proper display) running: ps -e | grep X echo $DISPLAY If no ...


1

Boot from your Windows DVD. If you bought Windows separately from your computer, then this is the DVD you bought. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, then the DVD most likely came in the box. If it did not, contact your manufacturer to see if they will give you one. Once you have booted the DVD, find the option that says something like "repair ...


1

I don't think there's a way of bypassing GRUB2 (or any other Linux bootloader) via EasyBCD. Most probably EasyBCD is not a universal bootloader and it works by chain loading into GRUB2. Your best bet is to try and make GRUB2 timeout on the Ubuntu entry immediately as Jonyburd's answer is suggesting. I believe you should look into why it failed.



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