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3

Unfortunately, somewhere on the way, you decided to encrypt your home directory, so basically, you need to restore from your most current system back-up. Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news


2

Couple of general thoughts I had over this general question : (1) During Windows shutdown, most services will generate atleast one event on terminating. Sometimes each service may have many events. Eg "NTP Service terminating", "Printer Driver got signal to terminate", "Printer Driver is flushing the queue" "Printer Driver Exitting". These Events are ...


2

Zorin OS is meant to look a lot like windows (or mac if you choose) http://zorinos.com/


2

Those 2 links explain things quite well, it's just a matter of double checking everything. Here's a couple things I do.. For Ubuntu shares: You should run "sudo apt-get install samba" on Ubuntu to get all the necessary components. Then you can configure the Ubuntu shared folders in /etc/samba/smb.conf & restart samba "sudo service samba restart" I have ...


1

Presuming that your local machine ("A") is a POSIX machine with e. g. OpenSSH, you can do this one of two ways: You can do it ad-hoc every time you connect with arguments to the SSH client: ssh -L13389:serverC:3389 username@serverB rdesktop localhost:13389 # Or point any RDP client to localhost:3389 Or, for a more permanent setting, you can add the ...


1

You do not state what OS your client, A, runs in your example. I'll assume there is some sort of command line ssh client available. Then, you can use you@A $ ssh -L54321:serverC:3389 serverB -p 12322 -l yourloginnameonB to create the tunnel. This command line needs some explanation. Let's do this part by part. The -L switch causes SSH to create a ...


1

There is a theme that makes Linux Mint look like Windows XP http://segfault.linuxmint.com/2015/08/cinnxp-makes-cinnamon-look-like-windows-xp/


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Assuming you have sufficient access rights to the device, you should be able to access the hidden partition from the VM by creating a special vmdk file that will map the raw partition to a virtual device. You need to first identify the wanted partition with something like: C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox> VBoxManage internalcommands listpartitions ...


1

Booting windows with grub on a non-first drive is a bit tricky: you will have to swap your disks: If you have installed DOS (or Windows) on a non-first hard disk, you have to use the disk swapping technique, because that OS cannot boot from any disks but the first one. The workaround used in GRUB is the command drivemap (see drivemap), like this: ...


1

There are several solutions I found so far. I think the most stable and good is using NoMachine (built on NX protocol). You need to install one on the client which is a Windows in my case. You can get from here. And one on the server, which is Linux Debian in my case. You can get from here.


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Prepare work: prepare a startup USB HDD disk, you can burn an Fedora.iso into it by unetbootin. That will help you boot and reinstall the grub after installation of windows os which will overwritten the bootloader. prepare a windows installation dvd. Action: 1 format the windows partition and install new windows os 2 use fedora USB HDD disk, to reboot ...


1

Files in Linux and Windows are handled very differently. Windows does not know the executable bit of Linux file permissions. That information (including the other permissions) are lost when transferring files from Linux to Windows or vice versa. Most probably the scp client at the Windows side sets the permissions of the copied files "the Windows way". That ...


1

Do not write anything on the hard disk. and do not reformat With every write operation you make you're at risk of replacing existing data; making it unrecoverable. Do your data recovery attempts (use tools like the ones Stephen Kitt suggested) and hopefully recover as much data as possible. And then start out new. Do not forget to file a bug report to the ...


1

You could give TestDisk a shot, ideally on a copy of the disk (assuming you have another computer you can copy it to...). TestDisk can recover partitions, if the disk hasn't be rewritten, and failing that PhotoRec can be used to recover some types of data. Do read all the documentation before using either tool!



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